#1
Im kind of stuck with the following.

How does a D#dim7 chord resolve to the I in E harmonic Minor?

I have it in the vib - i cadence therefore:

D# ---> Up to E
C ---> down to B
A ----> ???
F# ----> up to G

The D#dim7/F# resolves to E minor but... I dont know if the A moves up to a B or down to a G.

A little help please?
Sat in a lab, curing diseases. They actually LET me play with chemicals!
#2
Quote by Guitardude19
Im kind of stuck with the following.

How does a D#dim7 chord resolve to the I in E harmonic Minor?

I have it in the vib - i cadence therefore:

D# ---> Up to E
C ---> down to B
A ----> ???
F# ----> up to G

The D#dim7/F# resolves to E minor but... I dont know if the A moves up to a B or down to a G.

A little help please?
And it doesnt really, it just moves really well.

I've never thought about looking at each individual note of each chord to see how it moves to each individual note of the next chord. Where did you get that idea from? Original idea?
#3
Quote by demonofthenight
And it doesnt really, it just moves really well.

I've never thought about looking at each individual note of each chord to see how it moves to each individual note of the next chord. Where did you get that idea from? Original idea?


I just noticed in some Malmsteen pieces he had D#dim7 moving to either E minor or an E major chord and was wondering how it worked... And... So I could steal his ideas >_>
Sat in a lab, curing diseases. They actually LET me play with chemicals!
#4
Quote by Guitardude19
I just noticed in some Malmsteen pieces he had D#dim7 moving to either E minor or an E major chord and was wondering how it worked... And... So I could steal his ideas >_>
I have no idea why chords want to move the way they do. I just accept that they do.

Malmsteen was writing using real minor progressions. Meaning the fifth degree chord of the scale becomes dominant and the bVII chord becomes full diminished. This is done firstly because both these chords move well to the i chord and secondly because they dont move well to the III chord, which (if they did) would imply major tonality which is a no no when aiming to write minor progressions.
#7
Move the A up to B and double the 5th. If you wrote it out in standard notation, that's how it would appear, although you couldn't actually do that on the guitar without raising it an octave.

It could also move down to the G.


Doubling the third is generally to be avoided, from what I can remember from my lessons in harmony. Although of course, if it sounds good, then go ahead and do it
Last edited by shmooty at Jun 21, 2008,
#8
Quote by demonofthenight
And it doesnt really, it just moves really well.

I've never thought about looking at each individual note of each chord to see how it moves to each individual note of the next chord. Where did you get that idea from? Original idea?


Vioce leading.
#9
Far from an original idea, it's an entire field of study.

If they're both in root position, you'll want

C => B
A => G
F# => E
D# => E

(with adjacent chords you want all of your voices contrary to the movement of the bass to avoid parallels)
#10
D# - D# - E
F# - F# - G
A - A - B or G
C - B - B

This is a typical viio7 - V7 - i progression. vii07 doesn't usually go straight to i, but will usually resolve first to V7 and THEN to i.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.