#1
i just learned the minor scale and i have a fender g-dec amp so i can record a rhythm or riff and then loop it and play to it and i want to practice the minor scale a bit in the key of A so anybody have any riffs or chords or w/e that i can loop and play to that sound kinda down?
#2
Go way back and learn the notes all over the fretboard, chord construction, and the theory behind the major scale. The theory sticky covers this. Most likely, you haven't actually learned the minor scale, but just a box shape.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#4
Am G F G
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#6
Try

Am C G D
Quote by cakemonster91

*chuckle* A peanut. With a face.



Go to your staff paper and re-write this song a half step down so on the paper it'll be like you have a "C" just move it down to a "B#"




Know your theory, then play like you don't.

#7
it depends how you want it to sound. if you want a happy sounding song play major songs if you want sad sounding songs play minor. its not that hard

edit: i meant chords not songs
Last edited by ironman1478 at Jun 21, 2008,
#8
Quote by ironman1478
it depends how you want it to sound. if you want a happy sounding song play major songs if you want sad sounding songs play minor. its not that hard

edit: i meant chords not songs


i know but i want something sounds better than just random chords
#9
Quote by gunnrose5
alirght sick at least someone helps

Archeo helped you much more than you know at this point (if you follow his advice). You have to at least be willing to put some work in yourself.

Just so you know, the Am G F G should be used with an A minor scale, but use some Bb notes over that F chord and it'll be interesting.
#10
Quote by gunnrose5
i know but i want something sounds better than just random chords

play minor chords in the scale. its not "random"
#11
Quote by gunnrose5
alirght sick at least someone helps


If you don't know what to play the minor scale over, your problem is a lack of theory knowledge. Someone spoon feeding you a chord progression teaches you nothing.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#14
Quote by Archeo Avis
If you don't know what to play the minor scale over, your problem is a lack of theory knowledge. Someone spoon feeding you a chord progression teaches you nothing.

QFT
also about the randomness thing, it is more creativity than randomness. just pick a few chords for your verse and mix them up and use different strumming patterns until it sounds nice.
#15
Quote by one vision
Am Dm E7 is typical. Play it in 12 bar blues format.
You'll have to use A harmonic minor over E7.

Also, Am C G D uses a chromatic F# tone in the D chord.
#16
Quote by bangoodcharlote
You'll have to use A harmonic minor over E7.

Also, Am C G D uses a chromatic F# tone in the D chord.

In other words E Phryigian Dominant. Is it correct to call it that even though we're not playing modally? I understand what's going on, but when I explain it to people, can I say like " X Phryigian dominant over the dominant 7th chord"?
#17
Quote by one vision
In other words E Phryigian Dominant. Is it correct to call it that even though we're not playing modally? I understand what's going on, but when I explain it to people, can I say like " X Phryigian dominant over the dominant 7th chord"?


I'd be hesitant to call it E phrygian dominant, since the tonal center isn't E.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#18
Quote by one vision
In other words E Phryigian Dominant. Is it correct to call it that even though we're not playing modally? I understand what's going on, but when I explain it to people, can I say like " X Phryigian dominant over the dominant 7th chord"?
Call it A harmonic minor. Don't change the root every time the chord changes.
#20
Quote by ouchies
err are you sure about that. I'm pretty sure the sound of playing those notes (A B C D E F G#) over an E7 would result in a scale that sounds like E Phrygian dominant.
You're not changing scales every time the chord changes; that would be CRAZY!

The backing to the "Stairway to Heaven" solo is Am G F. Page doesn't use the A minor, G Mixolydian, and F Lydian scales over that. He simply uses the A minor scale!


Notes have different functions over the different chords, but if you were to call something a new scale after every chord change, it would be impossible to describe what was used to play a lead, or at least a lot more complex.
#21
Quote by ouchies
err are you sure about that. I'm pretty sure the sound of playing those notes (A B C D E F G#) over an E7 would result in a scale that sounds like E Phrygian dominant.

The progression is still based on A Harmonic Minor, and that's the scale that's being used. E isn't a new tonal center, so I wouldn't call it Phrygian Dominant.

Archeo: I've meant to ask you this for a while -- was the person in your signature being serious? It seems to dumb for that to be possible.
#22
Archeo: I've meant to ask you this for a while -- was the person in your signature being serious? It seems to dumb for that to be possible.


I put that in my sig shortly after I joined, so I don't remember the exact context. I do remember that it was intended as a joke.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#23
Quote by Archeo Avis
I put that in my sig shortly after I joined, so I don't remember the exact context. I do remember that it was intended as a joke.

Okay, good -- that's what I had thought/hoped.
#24
Quote by bangoodcharlote
You're not changing scales every time the chord changes; that would be CRAZY!

The backing to the "Stairway to Heaven" solo is Am G F. Page doesn't use the A minor, G Mixolydian, and F Lydian scales over that. He simply uses the A minor scale!


Notes have different functions over the different chords, but if you were to call something a new scale after every chord change, it would be impossible to describe what was used to play a lead, or at least a lot more complex.


I know.. but still.

Maybe my brain functions weird but when I think of A Harmonic minor over E7 in that progression I think the tonality would sound like E11 and A isn't the stable notes.

Thinking of modes changing over each chord is obviously way too much but knowing that E is the "best" note to rest over that E7, isn't it possible to say "E Phrygian Dominant".

I dunno, all I know is when I solo and jam I can follow chords fine, and if I got to that chord I would think "E Phrygian Dominant", not "A Harmonic Minor." And i've gotten away with it
#25
Ouchies, it's fine to think of the mode changing with every chord, Corwinoid calls it "Melodic Interchange". As you said, you can make A harmonic minor sound like E phryg dom over E7, so why not call it E phrygian dominant? Makes sense to me.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#27
Yes, this is where the views on modes come into play; personally I don't see things the same as you guys but I know where you're coming from.
#28
Quote by Ænimus Prime
Ouchies, it's fine to think of the mode changing with every chord, Corwinoid calls it "Melodic Interchange". As you said, you can make A harmonic minor sound like E phryg dom over E7, so why not call it E phrygian dominant? Makes sense to me.

I think so too. It's easier than saying "Play A harmonic minor with emphasis on E G# B and D". Oh well, whatever. The tonal center doesn't change, I know that.