#1
I have this guitar that I tuned to drop b and had it intonated to that. But it's my best guitar and I figured it would be more useful in standard tuning, if I retune it to that can I intonate the guitar myself or do I have to have a proffesional to do it? I would have no idea how to do it, that's why I'm asking if someone could just tell me how or if I would need to take it to a trained person.
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#3
I didn't really understand what the tutorial is saying, it just says to tune my guitar then something about string buzzing?
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#4
Basically, what you're doing is this: pick a string, and play the twelfth fret harmonic. Then play the fretted note at the twelfth fret. These two should be exactly the same. If the fretted note is sharp, the bridge is not close enough to the string's center, so you need to move the bridge closer by rotating the individual string screws away from you and vice versa if the fretted note is flat.
#5
Quote by :-D
Basically, what you're doing is this: pick a string, and play the twelfth fret harmonic. Then play the fretted note at the twelfth fret. These two should be exactly the same. If the fretted note is sharp, the bridge is not close enough to the string's center, so you need to move the bridge closer by rotating the individual string screws away from you and vice versa if the fretted note is flat.


im pretty sure its the opposite. if ur fretting the string right in the middle of it, if its sharp, the second half needs to be longer, meaning the bridge piece for that string needs to be pushed away.
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#7
Wow, here's the easiest way I know how to do this... Start with the heavy E string, and make sure it is perfectly in tune, and the rest of the strings are too, for proper neck tension. Then play the E string the twelfth fret, and see if the tuner still says the same note. If it's sharp, move the bridge towards the neck, or tip of the guitar. If it's flat, move it towards the end, stoptail, or butt of the guitar. Easy schmeezy... However, with tune-o-matics, perfect intonation is sometimes impossible to get, as the bridge is mounted wrong... Do not worry, just do the best you can dude.

Good luck, peace...

(And do the rest of the strings too, descending order!)
#8
This is silly but...

"Righty-tighty will make you flatty...
Lefty-lucy will make you sharpy"

...works for me

Chris
#9
Basically in plain simple dumb mans English:
-Adjust the screwsfound on the string saddles on the bridge (On most guitars you will require a small Hex Key) until the 12th fret on ech string s tuned to the same note (but ofcourse an octave higher) as the open tuning for that string!

Also sorry if some of my termanoligy is wrong but yeah its piss easy!
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#10
Quote by :-D
Basically, what you're doing is this: pick a string, and play the twelfth fret harmonic. Then play the fretted note at the twelfth fret. These two should be exactly the same. If the fretted note is sharp, the bridge is not close enough to the string's center, so you need to move the bridge closer by rotating the individual string screws away from you and vice versa if the fretted note is flat.


When intonating, you have to make the comparison between the entire scale of each string(i.e; open strings) to that of the fretted 12th. Trying to compare 12th harmonic to 12th fretted is going to get you nowhere. You aren't comparing anything. They're the same already anyhow. Tune up the guitar, and as accurately as possible. Then play each string open. Check where the needle rests on the tuner. Now fret at 12th and recheck tuner. This is the note that needs to match the open note, not the 12th harmonic.
Now you're making a worthwhile comparison of notes. Adjust bridge saddles accordingly. If the guitar is an acoustic with a fixed bridge saddle, it needs to be brought in to a tech to have the saddle compensated. They'll generally have access to strobe tuners which are highly accurate, and all the files and tools to shape the saddle correctly.
By the way, I've tried both ways of intonating on various styles of guitars, and the open vs. 12th fretted yields the most accurate results, always.