#1
I have been looking into Majors and it will be a long time before anything needs to be decided but I've been curious as to what a typical job for a Philosophy Major would be?

So ideas, experiences, so on and so forth?
#2
not to bash philosophy, but a degree in it is probably the most useless degree you could buy four years of school to recieve.
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#3
you can either be a writer, or a philosophy teacher. i think that's about it. make sure to minor in something good, or you're screwed. you can lecture passersby about the pointlessness of their struggles to become wealthy while at the same time begging for change.
#5
Quote by TheChallenged
not to bash philosophy, but a degree in it is probably the most useless degree you could buy four years of school to recieve.

Quote by ttreat31
Philosophy would not be a good major, just to be honest.


Listen to these two people. It is an AMAZING subject to study, but do it for fun and not for a living, unless if you love it so much that you are willing to pursue a PhD and become and educator or write some bestselling books.
Quote by denizenz
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#6
you will be SO SMART if you get through it, but it wont help you get any job other than a high school philosophy teacher or a professor at a catholic college. seriously, my philosophy teachers are the smartest people i know (i go to a catholic high school) and i hope to be as smart as they are some day, but if they would have went into business or medical they would have ALOT more money..... but its all about what makes you happy
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Quote by chaoticmayhem
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#7
Philosophy teacher.


There's no real jobs for a philosophy major other than that. I do know several lawyers who were philosphy majors as undergrads. Basically, if you're going to major in philosophy, you're gonna need to go to go to some type of grad school to have any kind of success. Trust me, I'm a history major philosophy minor and I'm ready to be in school for at least the next 6 years.
"There he goes. One of God's own prototypes. Some kind of high powered mutant never even considered for mass production. Too weird to live, and too rare to die."-Duke
#8
Quote by Glen'sHeroicAct
you can either be a writer, or a philosophy teacher. i think that's about it. make sure to minor in something good, or you're screwed. you can lecture passersby about the pointlessness of their struggles to become wealthy while at the same time begging for change.


thats pretty much all ive seen philosophy used for. trying to shame me for being an economics major. That and conversing about existential depression/ennui
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#9
yea, philosophy is really becoming a dieing art. go for something that is going to be big in the future, like economy or something.
#10
Quote by \m/Angus\m/
yea, philosophy is really becoming a dieing art. go for something that is going to be big in the future, like economy or something.


Dying. Not "dieing."
Quote by denizenz
I'll logic you right in the thyroid.

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#11
you can get many jobs. most jobs your actual degree is useless. it's the fact you got one and learned to think critically that employers want.
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#12
Well I kind of felt the way everyone else does about the major. I think it will just be a big hobby/interest of mine.
#13
Quote by primusfan
you can get many jobs. most jobs your actual degree is useless. it's the fact you got one and learned to think critically that employers want.


This part is where most people entering college get confused about. People tend to think that their line of work will be exactly what they learned in school. Not.
Quote by denizenz
I'll logic you right in the thyroid.

Art & Lutherie
#14
Alex Trebek graduated with a degree in philosophy. You could be a game show host!

I think writing would be about it, unless you go to grad school or get a good minor or something along those lines. Philosophy is definitely one of the less-useful majors available from a marketability standpoint.
#15
Quote by InvaderRen
thats pretty much all ive seen philosophy used for. trying to shame me for being an economics major. That and conversing about existential depression/ennui



I'm positive that I have never seen a pitgoer use the word ennui. Kudos
"There he goes. One of God's own prototypes. Some kind of high powered mutant never even considered for mass production. Too weird to live, and too rare to die."-Duke
#16
Quote by civildp1
I'm positive that I have never seen a pitgoer use the word ennui. Kudos

i have
faggot
#17
Quote by primusfan
you can get many jobs. most jobs your actual degree is useless. it's the fact you got one and learned to think critically that employers want.

Not all the time, i mean, the first person to graduate from college with a majoring degree in "Pornographic Arts and Filming" graduated from Indiana University.

What do you think hes doin right now? Not Business Law, ill tell you that much.
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Quote by chaoticmayhem
Toads are cool; it's those frog bastards that I don't like.


Whats your philosophy on life?
its so good to be back!
#18
As an individual that enjoys philosophy, I was wondering this myself... Most people here are saying that a philosophy degree is generally useless. However, I'm thinking otherwise. If I went in for a job and they saw I had a philosophy degree, they would know right off the bat that this person is dedicated, and definitely intelligent.

Everyone I know that takes interest in philosophy is an intelligent person, so I think having a degree would help with any job, in a sense.

If you want to make lots of money, however, it would be a wiser choice to spend your college money and time on something else. Do it for the fun of it, if you truly love philosophy.
#19
Quote by primusfan
you can get many jobs. most jobs your actual degree is useless. it's the fact you got one and learned to think critically that employers want.

That is only true to a point.

I doubt many of my fellow computer science peers will go get a job in marketing or history or garbage collection.

Most likely they'll do something pertaining to, well, computers.

-SD
#20
Quote by Waff
. If I went in for a job and they saw I had a philosophy degree, they would know right off the bat that this person is dedicated, and definitely intelligent.

Everyone I know that takes interest in philosophy is an intelligent person, so I think having a degree would help with any job, in a sense.



Why would they think dedication? That is not implied with a philosopher, but intelligence is usually.

i do agree with this however. I have gone to a Catholic school all my life and in the least, it has taught me a act like an educated person and be able to argue my point VERY well. If there is anything ive learned from my 17 years of philosophy classes then it is how to be persuasive and to MAKE people agree with me.
Member #19 of the "Use Your Fucking Dictionary Club."

Quote by chaoticmayhem
Toads are cool; it's those frog bastards that I don't like.


Whats your philosophy on life?
its so good to be back!
#21
Quote by Waff
As an individual that enjoys philosophy, I was wondering this myself... Most people here are saying that a philosophy degree is generally useless. However, I'm thinking otherwise. If I went in for a job and they saw I had a philosophy degree, they would know right off the bat that this person is dedicated, and definitely intelligent.

But if you went to, say, a law firm, that philosophy degree might tell them that you're intellectual and well-versed on ethics, but it would also tell them that you've never studied law. Some jobs might let you in if it doesn't require a huge amount of specialized knowledge, but most jobs would require at least some of it before they'd consider you.
#22
This degree will allow you to think deep, meaningful thoughts about being broke ass poor.

Quote by Waff
If I went in for a job and they saw I had a philosophy degree, they would know right off the bat that this person is dedicated, and definitely intelligent.


Or that you can memorize the things your teacher shovels your way and pander to his ego in your essays.
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Last edited by Free to Guitar at Jun 22, 2008,
#23
Can you minor in philosophy? i dunno, but that seems like the thing that you would want to do....
Member #19 of the "Use Your Fucking Dictionary Club."

Quote by chaoticmayhem
Toads are cool; it's those frog bastards that I don't like.


Whats your philosophy on life?
its so good to be back!
#24
Quote by digimon go!
i have
faggot



hey man, my propensity for blowing dudes has nothing to do with what words you may or may not have used.
"There he goes. One of God's own prototypes. Some kind of high powered mutant never even considered for mass production. Too weird to live, and too rare to die."-Duke
#25
Quote by Quintessence153
But if you went to, say, a law firm, that philosophy degree might tell them that you're intellectual and well-versed on ethics, but it would also tell them that you've never studied law. Some jobs might let you in if it doesn't require a huge amount of specialized knowledge, but most jobs would require at least some of it before they'd consider you.


If you went to any law firm with any sort of undergraduate degree you wouldn't get a job as a lawyer...
#26
Quote by SilentDeftone
That is only true to a point.

I doubt many of my fellow computer science peers will go get a job in marketing or history or garbage collection.

Most likely they'll do something pertaining to, well, computers.

-SD


well i was referring more to the liberal arts. sorry for not specifying.
#DTWD
#27
Quote by Quintessence153
But if you went to, say, a law firm, that philosophy degree might tell them that you're intellectual and well-versed on ethics, but it would also tell them that you've never studied law. Some jobs might let you in if it doesn't require a huge amount of specialized knowledge, but most jobs would require at least some of it before they'd consider you.


That was my other concern... Common sense would say a degree for your job would be the most important. A philosophy degree would be a good secondary one to have...
#28
Quote by The*Music*Man
Can you minor in philosophy? i dunno, but that seems like the thing that you would want to do....

I'm sure that 99% of philosophy programs would let you minor. It's pretty common for people to major in a "vocational" study and minor in a liberal art. I myself plan to pursue a minor in music alongside a major in architecture.

EDIT:
Quote by Cheers
If you went to any law firm with any sort of undergraduate degree you wouldn't get a job as a lawyer...

Okay...Replace the law firm with a computer networking business or something. I think my point still stands.
Last edited by Quintessence153 at Jun 22, 2008,
#29
Quote by civildp1
hey man, my propensity for blowing dudes has nothing to do with what words you may or may not have used.

i was kidding brah
although i have used that word but whatevaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaar
#30
Lawyer
Teacher
Politician
Anything!

Philosophy, to me, is ideally what university should be... Anyone who is going to university simply to get a job ruins the prospects of learning for other people.

I'm headed the philosophy route to learn, figure out a career/income later.
#31
Quote by primusfan
well i was referring more to the liberal arts. sorry for not specifying.

I agree with you, I just wanted to point out that it's not entirely true across the board.

-SD
#32
Are you planning on going to professional school after you graduate? If so, it really doesn't matter what you study as an undergraduate. Study what you want. If you don't plan on going to professional school, however, I would suggest getting a degree in something that is more marketable.
#33
nothing wrong with philosophy, a lot of times employers just look for employees that are dedicated which almost any university degree shows, many careers involve things learned on the job rather than university, employers usually just want to know you are teachable and dedicated. That being said philosophy can't get you into really competitive areas that are not related since employers are required to look for more specialized employees in those cases but there will be jobs that philosophy can get you into.