#1
I created a simple graphic to show and prove why thinner necks allow for more speed. They require more strength for barring and such, but thats just a matter of technique/getting used to. They do indeed allow for more speed however. This diagram proves why?

Last edited by nyandres at Jun 22, 2008,
#2
i hate thick necks, they feel too weird to me, i've only played with a thin neck
Quote by musical donkey
cyclobs you are demented..... in a good way
#4
Quote by nyandres
I created a simple graphic to show and prove why thinner necks allow for more speed. They require more strength for barring and such, but thats just a matter of technique/getting used to. They do indeed allow for more speed however. This diagram proves why?



This doesn't prove anything. If I took those same lines, made them have a really small reach on the thin neck and a huge reach on the thick, there ya go? "I used the same length!" I'm certain that the human hands don't work the same way lines do.

Sorry brah.
Blackstar HT-5

Agile AL-2000 with Chrome Hardware
#6
well seeing as its all depeendant on the person this is in fact disprovable, its all dependant on how the player feels with an instrument, say you have someone with a thick neck guitar who plays extremely fast and only uses that guitar, then if you give him a thinned neck and it felt wired to him he wouldnt be able to play faster, it would cripple him. logically it works but unfortunatly theres a thing called preferance and freewill that stop logic from being correct
Quote by haha
every time I see your username I press F8 out of curiosity then I have to give myself a big ol' facepalm


Quote by ouch
What the hell? F8 doesn't do anything interesting This toy is lame


Quote by TheReverend724
I can have a beer later, I need to level Charmeleon NOW!
#7
Um... I have no issue whatsoever playing the top E or the bottom E with my thumb in the same place on thick neck guitars and my hands are nowhere near being big, in fact my pinky is actually proportionally smaller than it should be...

For example, my thumb doesn't move when I play the basic 3 nps Major scale.
#8
I can't realize supposed speed benefits when I am uncomfortable. I might be a minority but I hate thin necks.
This space foreclosed, due to the ailing economy.
#9
That's silly. Thin necks make you play faster because guitars with thin necks sound thin and bad, and you play fast to distract people from the bad tone.
#10
Quote by Roc8995
That's silly. Thin necks make you play faster because guitars with thin necks sound thin and bad, and you play fast to distract people from the bad tone.

i would sig that but im to lazy to do it
Quote by haha
every time I see your username I press F8 out of curiosity then I have to give myself a big ol' facepalm


Quote by ouch
What the hell? F8 doesn't do anything interesting This toy is lame


Quote by TheReverend724
I can have a beer later, I need to level Charmeleon NOW!
#11
Quote by CrushedCan
This doesn't prove anything. If I took those same lines, made them have a really small reach on the thin neck and a huge reach on the thick, there ya go? "I used the same length!" I'm certain that the human hands don't work the same way lines do.

Sorry brah.


i don't think you understand
as your fingers are teh same length in both pictures, the more vertical movement they have to do, the less lateral movement they can do, cutting down the reach you can get
although this model doesn't accurately show how your hand works
Gear:
Ibanez Destroyer
Roland Cube 60
Boss TU-80
Ovation acoustic
Original Crybaby

"If at first you don't succeed, destroy all evidence that you tried" Josh Homme

My Profile

^^Check out my profile for some improv solos^^
Last edited by High_o at Jun 22, 2008,
#12
Quote by CrushedCan
This doesn't prove anything. If I took those same lines, made them have a really small reach on the thin neck and a huge reach on the thick, there ya go? "I used the same length!" I'm certain that the human hands don't work the same way lines do.

Sorry brah.


Well the lines represent the reach of the fingers, and therefore its all very similar. The width of the fretboard and string spacing also affect this. More string spacing means less reach. Its simple mathematics. Hands dont strech and shrink, and therefore like a line represents what i mean. The line is just distance that can be reached at the given point.
#14
Except that one can move their thumb when they play, which totally negates this argument, and it'snot hard to move it either.
Blackstar HT-5

Agile AL-2000 with Chrome Hardware
#15
Quote by CrushedCan
Except that one can move their thumb when they play, which totally negates this argument, and it'snot hard to move it either.


THats true, but by standard technique that slows down. More movement ends in less accuracy, and less speed.

Although I believe players always learn techniques to make up for weaknesses, so the difference is probably not too much. I also believe comfort is the most important thing to speed. However, players who get comfortable with thin necks have the advantage of being comfortable with a design that as you can all see allows for more speed.
#16
^ I still don't get what you think makes a thin necked guitar inherently faster than a thin one. I don't move my hand any more on a guitar with a thick neck than one with a thin one.
#17
Quote by T!AN
^ I still don't get what you think makes a thin necked guitar inherently faster than a thin one. I don't move my hand any more on a guitar with a thick neck than one with a thin one.


You may start to notice if you ever become a stretchy player. Its most noticeable in those riffs riffs where you have to do a stretch from the 1st fret to the 8th or more. The thick neck may not let you do the stretch.
#18
I see what you are saying sir. I apologize for being wrong, and am glad I learned something.
Blackstar HT-5

Agile AL-2000 with Chrome Hardware
#19
Ok this is the best way to explain it. You see i have made two lines. Imagine then being the maximum you can stretch.
Now imagine a riff that requires that stretch. With the thicker neck, your ability to stretch will without a doubt not reach as far. And that will make one resort to tapping or something.

The difference is not huge. In spite of this, I respect your opinions. Comfort is indeed more important. I feel more comfortable on a wizard II than on a Wizard neck. The wizard neck has the mentioned benefits, but I dont enjoy playing on it as much, and that makes me play faster on the Wiz II. But im sure id be better on the Wizard if I could get used to it.
Last edited by nyandres at Jun 22, 2008,
#20
wow...such an obvious thing
but you got it...
WRONG.
Thin necks are "faster" because there is less contact of your hand on the back of the neck. Your thumb still has to move the same amount, regardless of the thickness of the neck (im talking laterally, not horizontally) Besides, moving your thumb less (im assuming you're talking about going from 1st to 6th string type thing) doesnt really matter, its not like moving your thumb as you're playing makes you slower at all. or atleast it doesnt for me

Its the same thing as finished necks vs unfinished necks, and scalloped necks vs unscalloped neck. Less friction=faster movement.
Besides, its all preference anyway. I know some people who play "slower" on thin necks anyway.
Gear:
Ibanez RG550 20th RFR
Traynor YCV50
Fender FMT HH Tele
Mesa Boogie 2ch Triple Rectifier
2 1x12 custom Theile cabs
ISP Decimator
Krank Kranshaft
Boss BF-2 Flanger
BBE Sonic Maximizer
#21
Odds are you are arguing about what amounts to a negligible change. One of Randy Rhoads most commonly used guitars was a Les Paul. Shawn Lane used a Vigier, which had thicker necks than most other "shred" guitars.

As crazy a theory as this might sound. Maybe what makes these guitarists faster is the mass amount of work they put into developing their technical abilities.
#22
my long thin fingers have a bit too much reach for me to comfortably play a thin neck. Strat neck is as thin as i can go before it starts to feel awkward. I even allowed myself to adjust to fender neck profiles, I used to play an SG exclusively, but it couldn't give me the single coil tones i was looking for.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.