#1
Well lately ive been attempting to compose some works. Ive managed to get all my ideas down, and i know my theory pretty well (well.. to an extent). Anyway, everything ive scored ive just left it in C. I really like to write alot of what i would consider to be jazz and have chords all over the place and dont particularly have a set key.

So this brings me to my question. How do i define a key signature to my songs? Any help is greatly appreciated.
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#3
Do you mean, writing a key in standard notation or finding out which notes are sharp/flat in a key? Be more specific. I'd take a look at the circle of fifths just so you're sure of how keys are defined.
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#5
Quote by BBell
So this brings me to my question. How do i define a key signature to my songs? Any help is greatly appreciated.
With jazz, you determine the key by checking what key the majority of the chords are in. Sometimes it would be best to have 2 or 3 keys in a jazz song, like this parts in so and so key, this parts in another key and the parts in the door key and so on.
Jazz songs change key heaps.
#6
To answer Anno's question, no software, im actually trying to score it

Hm let me see if i can explain it a little more clearly (lol sorry). When i scored my song, i didnt give it a key signature (just left it in c maj) i understand the circle of fifths, and fourths.

I suppose with something as unstructured as my song is (it is structured, just no defined key), you wouldnt need a key signature, but what would be the purpose of using a key signature anyway? I suppose it would clear things up for someone who is just looking at the piece of music, and maybe easier on the composer because he wouldnt have to write out so many sharps and flats.

Heres a new question. How would you determine a key signature of a song when really the song is all over the place. For example my song starts out with Cmin7 B/e Bm7 A#/D# A#m7 A/d Am7 G#/C# and randomly gets to chords such as A#add9 and a Gsus4/G#. Would it even be possible to determine the key? or would it be best to just leave it as unmarked (c major)
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#7
ahh just read demons post. Thanks, for some reason i couldnt see the obvious of changing the key signature on different lines.
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#8
Quote by BBell
To answer Anno's question, no software, im actually trying to score it

Hm let me see if i can explain it a little more clearly (lol sorry). When i scored my song, i didnt give it a key signature (just left it in c maj) i understand the circle of fifths, and fourths.

I suppose with something as unstructured as my song is (it is structured, just no defined key), you wouldnt need a key signature, but what would be the purpose of using a key signature anyway? I suppose it would clear things up for someone who is just looking at the piece of music, and maybe easier on the composer because he wouldnt have to write out so many sharps and flats.

Heres a new question. How would you determine a key signature of a song when really the song is all over the place. For example my song starts out with Cmin7 B/e Bm7 A#/D# A#m7 A/d Am7 G#/C# and randomly gets to chords such as A#add9 and a Gsus4/G#. Would it even be possible to determine the key? or would it be best to just leave it as unmarked (c major)


Okay, I understand you now, just didn't make sense to me for some reason last night, heh. Demon's got you covered!
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#9
Depending on what you're writing, it may be far simpler and easier to avoid a key signature altogether.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#10
Quote by Archeo Avis
Depending on what you're writing, it may be far simpler and easier to avoid a key signature altogether.


No. It may be appropriate, but it won't be simpler.

EDIT: I take that back, i should have read the rest of the thread, I didn't notice that you were talking about jazz. My bad!