#1
Alright, so my drummer (and former roommate, very good friend for years) is moving to Los Angeles to go to music school. I have decided that I'm tired of college for the time being, I have some money, so I'm gonna go with him. I've already moved back home with my parents and am working 45-60 hours a week and saving almost every cent I make just to go out there in September.

Living in Columbus is alright, but it's not a good music city, and as long as we're here I don't feel like we're trying hard enough.

Our bassist and guitarist are not considering the move with us. The bassist wants to stay in school, the guitarist has a longtime girlfriend, and I really can't blame them for not wanting to come. They'll be replaced easily enough in LA, considering my roommate/drummer will be at school with thousands of musicians, and considering our general talent (he is a monstrously skilled drummer and I have a voice that literally melts female undergarments), I assume we'll be able to pick and choose.

Now, I'm the primary writer of music, being the singer, I generally come up with a rhythm guitar or piano part, a melody, the lyrics, a basic song structure, and then we work together as a band to figure out what's going to go where and so forth, and through that experimentation we generally come to a final song.

Is it kosher for us to continue to play the original music that I've written after I've moved? I'm definitely not going to keep the same band name, out of respect, but most of those songs are mine. If I get a new band I want to do the same old chop-and-slash technique with our old basic versions of the songs, not necessarily copy every part verbatim.

I doubt that the other two members of the band would be playing the songs at all anywhere else... so what do you think?
#3
as long as you wrote the songs, i don't see a problem with it at all.
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#4
Quote by Fi-Fi
is it kosher to be so self assumed about you're vocals?

well, considering this is the internet, and considering the absolute ridiculousness of my statement meaning it could not ever be possibly remotely true, and considering I actually am a singer who is likely well above average...

yes.
#5
I've been in a similar position myself.
You write some material with a band, then the band splits later down the line and you have these perfectly good songs going to waste.
I personaly had no qualms about re-doing them with another band, and even updated and reworked a few of them, and I'm had guys I used to be in a band with turn up to gigs and listen to the new versions of the songs we used to play together but I've never had a negative comment, quite the opposite infact.
I do tend to just use the ones where I had the biggest input though.
#6
If you wrote them then I think you should be able to use them. You could always ask the other band mates if they have a problem with it. If they don't then you have nothing to lose.
Your opinion is just that, YOUR opinion. It doesn't make you right. It doesn't make you better. It doesn't make you god. Everyone has their own view and that view is neither right or wrong.

Ignorance destroys music.
#7
ask your band mates if they're cool with it. Chances are they will be. And if they say no, screw em. Do it anyway. You'll be 2000 miles away.
"There he goes. One of God's own prototypes. Some kind of high powered mutant never even considered for mass production. Too weird to live, and too rare to die."-Duke
#8
Pretty much +1 to what civildp1 said. Out of courtesy, ask the other guys if they mind. If you get their approval, in principal, you're good.

However, it is worth keeping in mind that, even if you don't have their blessing, if you wrote the songs, there's really screw-all they can say about it. People will moan about "I wrote the bass line" or "I wrote the guitar riff" but in reality, none of that matters. The only thing that does matter is the melody and the lyrics. That's it.

If they don't like it, you're, as they say, 2000 miles away, and in the right at that. What are they going to do?

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#9
Quote by axemanchris
Pretty much +1 to what civildp1 said. Out of courtesy, ask the other guys if they mind. If you get their approval, in principal, you're good.

However, it is worth keeping in mind that, even if you don't have their blessing, if you wrote the songs, there's really screw-all they can say about it. People will moan about "I wrote the bass line" or "I wrote the guitar riff" but in reality, none of that matters. The only thing that does matter is the melody and the lyrics. That's it.

If they don't like it, you're, as they say, 2000 miles away, and in the right at that. What are they going to do?

CT

Agreed, and besides, even if you were the person who only wrote the bass line or guitar riff, or even if you had nothing whatsoever to do with writing the song, how is it any different to doing any other cover song?
Performance wise, it really doesn't matter, it's when you come to record and release a co-written song that you could possibly have any problems.
#10
Quote by civildp1
ask your band mates if they're cool with it. Chances are they will be. And if they say no, screw em. Do it anyway. You'll be 2000 miles away.



+1
#11
Be nice to your bandmates-ask them if they mind you taking their parts and showing them to your new one.

If they don't like it, just keep your existing drums, lyrics, and whatever guitar/piano part you have, and get the new musicians to make some new ones. If they're good enough to play well with you, they should have no trouble.

I can't imagine the old guitarist/bassist having much of a problem with it. Riffs are cheap, let's be honest. They'll think of something new.

Remember the whole issue of writing credits when recording/selling, though-be fair to your old band, give them credit for parts they did.
#12
Quote by Samzawadi

Remember the whole issue of writing credits when recording/selling, though-be fair to your old band, give them credit for parts they did.


Slacker raised a very important point - it is not in the live playing that matters so much as when you go to record and distribute the stuff.

If they are your songs, you credit yourself with the writing. If someone else came up with a bass line or a guitar riff, they didn't help write the song. They helped with the arrangement, or with the production, but not the writing. It is not a writing credit. That is for melody and lyrics only - not even chord progressions are copyrightable.

You never, ever open up a CD case and see:
lyrics - Larry
chords - Curly
riffs - Moe
bass line - Homer
drum breaks - Abbot
melody and harmonies - Costello

Ever.

In the above circumstance it would be:

SongTitle (Larry/Costello)

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#13
Quote by axemanchris
Slacker raised a very important point - it is not in the live playing that matters so much as when you go to record and distribute the stuff.

If they are your songs, you credit yourself with the writing. If someone else came up with a bass line or a guitar riff, they didn't help write the song. They helped with the arrangement, or with the production, but not the writing. It is not a writing credit. That is for melody and lyrics only - not even chord progressions are copyrightable.

You never, ever open up a CD case and see:
lyrics - Larry
chords - Curly
riffs - Moe
bass line - Homer
drum breaks - Abbot
melody and harmonies - Costello

Ever.

In the above circumstance it would be:

SongTitle (Larry/Costello)

CT

Yeah, agreed, do you honestly think Ringo Starr or George Harrison had no input whatsoever in most of the Beatles songs?
As Chris says, they helped 'arrange' them, but it would still generaly say Lennon/McCartney on the label.