#1
I've been practicing the minor pentatonic scale and was just wondering, when you play a solo with this scale do you basically just jump around the fretboard playing the notes that fit that scale in different patterns?

There are 5 positions - is it cool to just move all around through them in any way you want or should you stick in a single position for a lick, pause, then go to the next?

Also when you solo would you just stay in 1 scale or would you switch it up - say going from a minor pentatonic to a major pentatonic? I havent learned any other scale forms yet and wondering what to try next (either major/minor or major pent I think). But would you do a whole solo in the same style or is the idea that you would mix them up throughout the solo?
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#2
Honestly, as long as you stay in-key, there are no rules for what to do. Most great guitarists are known for doing just what they think is cool, and that's how you should play too. If I want a certain effect, then I will follow certain "rules", but generally I just do whatever I think sounds good, in terms of positions or choice of scale. I use notes that will theoretically fit the progression that I'm playing over, but I play them in any order that I think is cool. I'd say you should simply experiment with the scale, the positions, and work out your own note-patterns.
#3
Quote by Cuddrow
Honestly, as long as you stay in-key, there are no rules for what to do. Most great guitarists are known for doing just what they think is cool, and that's how you should play too. If I want a certain effect, then I will follow certain "rules", but generally I just do whatever I think sounds good, in terms of positions or choice of scale. I use notes that will theoretically fit the progression that I'm playing over, but I play them in any order that I think is cool. I'd say you should simply experiment with the scale, the positions, and work out your own note-patterns.

i agree with ^^ they just do whats they think is cool but some people just do like what you said and just skip around playing diffrent notes in a scale
#4
well if u dont know it already, A minor pent. is the same as C major pent. so keep that in mind. and if u want to know wat to do with ur scales, i guess u might wanna learn about player's styles and wat they do with their scales. for example, kirk hammett does a lot of triplets on the pentatonic scale, one example is the solo in the four horseman ( i think its the four horseman, it might be a different song). and u might wanna do lots of bends, fast runs, legato licks, sweep arpeggios, all types of techniques that u might wanna use in a song. like the guy above me said, as long as u sound good it doesnt matter. u dont even necessarily need to stay in key.
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#5
Quote by Aitrus
I've been practicing the minor pentatonic scale and was just wondering, when you play a solo with this scale do you basically just jump around the fretboard playing the notes that fit that scale in different patterns?

There are 5 positions - is it cool to just move all around through them in any way you want or should you stick in a single position for a lick, pause, then go to the next?

Also when you solo would you just stay in 1 scale or would you switch it up - say going from a minor pentatonic to a major pentatonic? I havent learned any other scale forms yet and wondering what to try next (either major/minor or major pent I think). But would you do a whole solo in the same style or is the idea that you would mix them up throughout the solo?


There's 5 notes in that scale, that's all, the 5 positions are just all the places those notes occur in a 12 fret span.

Provided you're in the right key for the chords you're playing over those 5 notes will work.

As far as other stuff to learn goes, the first thing you need to learn is the notes on the fretboard, followed by the major scale and its intervals.
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#6
Quote by Aitrus
I've been practicing the minor pentatonic scale and was just wondering, when you play a solo with this scale do you basically just jump around the fretboard playing the notes that fit that scale in different patterns?


Kind of, ideally you want to stop seeing it as separate scale shapes, and just kind of see where all the notes are. But keep in mind that it's only 5 notes, no matter where you play them. So switching to a different position will only really change the octave and voicing of the notes.

There are 5 positions - is it cool to just move all around through them in any way you want or should you stick in a single position for a lick, pause, then go to the next?


I wouldn't say you need to pause and then switch, it's just as easy to link them up without doing that. But yeah, you can stick to a single position just find, or you can move across the whole neck, it depends on what kind of effect you want right. I mean if you want to create a feeling of movement you can start down low on the neck and work your way up, or vise versa.

Also when you solo would you just stay in 1 scale or would you switch it up - say going from a minor pentatonic to a major pentatonic?


In some cases you can do that. It happens a lot in Blues music and classic rock, but it's one of those thing's you've got to be careful with. It can either sound really good or really bad.
#7
Thanks for the replies. I understand pentatonic is only 5 notes so moving around the fretboard with the different shapes can only do so much, I was wondering if most solos really only consisted of 5 notes (for rock) as that seemed weird - hence the Q about switching scales during the same solo.

Looking at some major pent it looks like they are the same 5 shapes, the root note just falls at a different spot, so that shouldn't take long to learn.

I started working on the fretboard memorization. I know both E strings and the A string (had to learn for power chords), its the other 3 I have to work on. I even have a trick for D and G, just haven't found a way to really drill it in (power chord is root 5th octave, so note on D string is same as E string just 2 frets down, same relationship for A and G). I figure if I can memorize where the roots are in all the 5 shapes this will also help with memorizing.

My friend told me to work on intervals too (i think anyways) as he said you need to know how major and minor scales work in order to know what will sound good. i.e. if a song is G, C, D you want to find the scale where those notes are I, iv, V (apparently a popular rock chord progression?). You then know what scale it is, and thus which pentatonic scale to use to solo around it.
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#8
In all honesty a lot of great solos will just use those 5 notes - it's your choice of note with regards to the backing chords and also how you play them that makes things interesting.
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