#1
I've looked it up on google and searched on youtube and im still not getting it...can anyone explain maybe with a youtube link and video time to a song part that has 6/8 timing? thanks.
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#2
Ah... 6/8... what a bitch that is to learn.

What exactly are you having trouble understanding about it?

Basicly, 6/8 is where the 8th note gets the beat, and there are six in one measure. Generally, 6/8 is conducted in two beats, and in each beat you play 3 8th notes. Each beat is worth a dotted quarter note, or three eighth notes. Maybe you should get a metronome or ask a music teacher or something how it works so they can explain it better.
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#3
count: " one and a two and a"
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#4
yeah the 2nd number tells you which notes get the beat (in this case an 8th note) and the first on tells how many of them make a whole measure (in this case six.)
#5
^ how about nothing else matters, the whole damn song is in 6/8. it's 6 equally spaced and timed eighth notes.
#6
ok so in 4/4 you count 1-2-3-4 1-2-3-4 and so on
in 3/4 its 1-2-3 1-2-3 like a waltz
6/8 is just half time of 3/4, and it has a different feel to it
so think one-and-two-and-three-and one-and-two-and-three-and
but turn the ands into numbers like this
ONE-two-three-FOUR-five-six
yeah
#7
i would say that you completely understand the 4/4 time signature before getting a little ahead to something like 6/8...but i checked nothing else matters, and it fits to me...it fits perfectly with 1 2 3 4 5 6 / 1 2 3 4 5 6 etc....but you have to remember that they are 8th notes, NOT quarter notes, just listen to the drums because they are vital when finding a time signature...in this 6/8 the snare is hit on the 4th beat...and just putting it out there (usually the snare is hit on the 3rd beat in 4/4)
Last edited by Schane at Jun 23, 2008,
#8
6/8 is just half time of 3/4


False. 3/4 has three beats per measure, whereas 6/8 has two.
Time signatures are not fractions, and the top and bottom numbers do not always directly reflect the beat unit and number of beats. 6/8 is very nearly always used as a compound meter, and is interpreted differently. When dealing with compound meters...

Divide the top number by three: Three goes into six twice, meaning that 6/8 has two beats per bar.

Multiply the beat unit by three: This gives us three eighth notes, or a dotted quarter note.

6/8 therefore has two beats per measure, and each beat is a dotted quarter note.
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#9
Quote by Archeo Avis
False. 3/4 has three beats per measure, whereas 6/8 has two.
Time signatures are not fractions, and the top and bottom numbers do not always directly reflect the beat unit and number of beats. 6/8 is very nearly always used as a compound meter, and is interpreted differently. When dealing with compound meters...


Quick question: can you think of any piece off the top of your head that treats 6/8 as a simple meter?
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#10
Quote by titopuente
Quick question: can you think of any piece off the top of your head that treats 6/8 as a simple meter?


Nothing famous. I've written pieces with six beats per bar, where each beat is an eighth note, and I can't really think of anything simpler to call it than 6/8. As long as you specify to the performer that it is being treated as simple time, I see no reason why it necessarily has to be compound (though it very nearly always is)
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Last edited by Archeo Avis at Jun 23, 2008,
#12
a very simple but ingenious piece by miles davis..all blues...has every device of the blues built in it (thus its title) ... a very basic "head" .. melody line...it has both a major and minor feel as well as the traditional 12 bar blues frame work...great improve piece and you can play 4/4 time over it.. and it is a good study for basic blues .. the 6/8 time feel is easy to decipher and count ...

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#13
Quote by Archeo Avis
I've written pieces with eight beats per bar, where each beat is an eighth note
Eigth beats? In 6/8? Impressive...


Assuming you meant six, wouldn't it be easier to write it in 3/4?
#15
Quote by Archeo Avis
False. 3/4 has three beats per measure, whereas 6/8 has two.
Time signatures are not fractions, and the top and bottom numbers do not always directly reflect the beat unit and number of beats. 6/8 is very nearly always used as a compound meter, and is interpreted differently. When dealing with compound meters...

Divide the top number by three: Three goes into six twice, meaning that 6/8 has two beats per bar.

Multiply the beat unit by three: This gives us three eighth notes, or a dotted quarter note.

6/8 therefore has two beats per measure, and each beat is a dotted quarter note.
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Why compound time confuses otherwise intelligent people is absolutely beyond me, but our friend Archeo nailed it. And if you want a perfect example of 6/8 time, open iTunes and pull up John Philip Sousa's Washington Post March. It doesn't get much more straightforward than that.
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