#1
hey everyone. i have played bass for about 2-3 years. ive come to terms that i would rather play guitar, and now im sitting here with my brothers shecter. im wondering the most important things i should learn on guitar. i used a pick for bass for the past year, so my picking hand is slightly ahead of everything else. anyway, any thoughts?
futball season and football season.
#2
For starters - Bending in tune, hammer ons, pull offs and experimenting with different vibrato techniques.
#6
Aside from physical and playing differences- chordal knowledge and scale theory. Because most bassists tend to be root note junkies (you may not fall into this category, I don't know), their knowledge of how to build chords from scales, substitutions, additions, modes etc is usually very poor. Chords are not merely shapes on the fretboard. That is how you'll look at them at first, but it's important to get past that and know how they're made. So use your new choice of instrument to brush up on your theory.
#7
Start from the beginning. Don't think that bass skills are particularly transferable.

I found open chords and bar chords the hardest things to get right when I started playing guitar. Having played bass for a while, soloing seemed pretty easy with the tight string spacing, light strings and narrow frets.
#8
nah, i wasnt really a rote note junkie. i played alot of different things. i know my theory is weak, but i cant get lessons...if i could i wouldnt have asked here.

what type of things should i be learning? chords, etc etc?
futball season and football season.
#9
Quote by MLmaster37
what type of things should i be learning? chords, etc etc?


How to build chords, scales, modes etc, and how they relate to each other. You must also know your key signatures to do this effectively (look up the 'cycle of fifths'). For example, the key of A has three sharps- F, C, and G. So spelt out, the key of A major is A, B, C#, D, E, F#, G#. Within each major (and minor) scale, seven normal chords/triads can be built from it, as there are seven notes. From any note, you miss one, count one, miss one, count one. So from lets say B, the chord you would build (from this particular scale) is B, D, and F#. B is the root of that chord, D is the third, and F# is the fifth. Root, third, fifth. That's how we build simple triads. If you know anything about music, you know that that's a Bminor chord. Even though this is the major scale, there are only three major chords within it. Starting from the root of the scale (A, in this case) building chords from each successive note, the chords you get are as follows;

Major, minor, minor, major, major, minor, diminished.

So, the triad built from G# in the key of A major is G#diminished, and so on. Once you figure this out and get it down, modal theory is really a doddle, because it's basically the same. There are seven modes within a major (or minor) scale, and are as follows;

Ionian, Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aeolian, Locrian.

A 'mode' within music is basically playing a scale, but within the key signature of another scale. This sounds complicated, but it's really not. Let's say we play from D to D. The key of D major (and B minor) has two sharps, F and C. It's D, E, F#, G, A, B. C#. But, let's say we play don't play that. Let's say we instead play D, E, F#, G#, A, B, C# and up to the octave, D. So we've played D to D, but not within the key of D. If you look above, we've actually played D to D within the key of A. D is the fourth degree of the key of A. The fourth mode is Lydian. So what we've just done in this example is played D Lydian, in it's most simple and distilled form. So modal playing is, in very over-simplified terms, looking at a key, and starting from a note other than the root of the key. Modes also follow the same major/minor pattern as the chords. So Dorian is a minor mode, Lydian is a major mode, Locrian is diminished, etc.

Stuff like that, man. You don't need a teacher, really. It's certainly helpful to have one, but you can learn it of your own volition. That stuff I've written above is merely the most basic, grass-roots general musicianship. It goes into way more complex stuff. Don't feel bad that you don't know any of it though. Guitarists are very, very lazy compared to other instrumentalists. Most guitarists don't even know this basic stuff, let alone bassists. They just look as chords and scales as 'shapes'. Which is wrong. There's nothing wrong with using shapes as a way of mapping out the fretboard, but you need to learn the theory behind them if you mean to do anything useful with them. I advise that you learn it, as all the best musicians in the world know this stuff, and knowing it yourself will allow you to be the best that you can be.
Last edited by Martin Scott at Jun 23, 2008,
#10
I played bass for 3-4 years. Eventually, I got sick of playing background, I wanted to be heard, and not play the background for someone else. Tuning is harder on a guitar, I broke a lot of strings when I started.
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#11
yeah learn chords, keep walking up and down the neck and teach your self to solo. the bass helped me there a lot.
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#12
mm this is kinda off topic but are you quiting bass? cuz it kinda sounds like you are and idk it might be just me but i think you should stick with it andd play guitar it never hurts to be able to play more than one instrument idkk lol just sayin
#13
Quote by xsv434
mm this is kinda off topic but are you quiting bass? cuz it kinda sounds like you are and idk it might be just me but i think you should stick with it andd play guitar it never hurts to be able to play more than one instrument idkk lol just sayin


I agree. I bought a bass for this reason. Bass is an underrated instrument. You can write songs on bass. You need to know your theory first, though
#14
yeahh im buying my friends old bass just cuz i feel like learning a new instrument and so i can write and record songs at home n stuff
#15
It also makes you better at guitar if you practice scales etc on bass, since the scale length of the neck is way longer than on any guitar. Three note per string scales are a bitch on bass. Worth practicing, though. Then when you do it on guitar it's so easy it's not even funny.
#16
you can always find a job in a band as a bassist. next to a good singer a bass player is the hardest to find at least in my band experiances.
epiphone gothic lp
ibanez arc-300
epiphone traditional pro lp
vox ad100vht head.
vox cab
#17
Quote by mig-29
you can always find a job in a band as a bassist. next to a good singer a bass player is the hardest to find at least in my band experiances.


VERY true. You're basically never going to earn money as a guitarist. You can earn money playing bass even when you're not that good, though.
#18
Quote by lespaul#1
I played bass for 3-4 years. Eventually, I got sick of playing background, I wanted to be heard, and not play the background for someone else. Tuning is harder on a guitar, I broke a lot of strings when I started.


You've gotta find someone who lets you be more in the front. There's alot of possibilities to get heard as a bassist. Especially because you can play alot of stuff without interrupting with the guitar and vocals.
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#19
no, im not quitting bass.... i am, however, attempting to learn how to play guitar. after i get the hang of guitar, i plan on deciding which one to play. i dont have alot of time for music, as im a football player and wrestler. but in the off seasons, music helps me not sit around and play video games (atttempt to, anyway.)
futball season and football season.
#20
I'm mainly a bassist, but play guitar quite a bit too.
Knowing your theory does help when it comes to writing your own stuff.
Otherwise, I say getting the hang of chords is very useful, but that may just be because I tend to play guitar so I can sing along at the same time, so I play chords often.
Playing bass and singing, hard as fook.
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