#1
Alrighty, I'm in the market for a bad ass shred guitar, and well I need some advice from folks who aren't rookies in the field.

Things I'd like/have questions about

24 Frets-A lot of times I'll be rippin it up on my SG and I'll get to my high E 22nd fret and want more, so I'm thinking I'd like the extra two frets. But question: Does they add an extra two frets to the fretboard lengthwise or, just scrunch all of them together more to fit two more on? And if you have any opinions on 24 frets, love em, hate em, etc. lemme know

Pick-ups-I want the hottest ones I can find, right now I struggle to pull off pinch harmonics with my SG, the range to hit them on there is so precise its real easy to miss. I'd like something that gives you a little more room for error, and such. Also, wondering about Active vs. Passive pick-ups. Active are hotter (correct?) but wondering how long batteries last in em, what kind of batteries they take usually and whether or not you recommend them.

Floyd-Rose-At the moment, I am whammy-less, and well, prolly a good thing for when I was starting cause it really helped me develop my vibrato and bends, but I love playing with FR when I get the chance. I hear they are a real bitch to string, and tune (don't quite understand about the tuning part if someone could elaborate) , anything else negative, or positive I guess that you like about em?

Neck: Round vs. Flat- What's the difference? Benefits of one or the other? Only thing I can see from my perspective is that flat might give you a little more finger-stretch range, I guess. And how big of a deal is the material that the neck is made of in terms of speed. I'm talkin bout the types of wood I guess, like is there one that is noticeably better than another?

Body- Same question as the neck for the most part, how do the different types of wood effect your sound?

Style-I really like the size of my SG, the smaller body just fits me about perfectly, so any suggestions on a guitar please note the size, whether large, medium or small.

Looks-Haha, I don't want any retarded lookin guitars suggested, none of those space-age-crazy-I'm-compensating-for-something-I'm-lacking kind of guitars. Just stuff that looks like Les Pauls, SG's, Strats, etc. variations on the classic styles.

That's pretty much all I can think of at the moment, appreciate all the help in advance. Please feel free to comment, criticize, etc. on anything you wish. Thanks again.
#3
Michael Kelly Hex Deluxe

24 Frets: It has them.

Pickups: It has active EMGs; the batteries last a long time if you remember to unplug the cable from the guitar. Whether you like EMGs or not is down to personal preference.

Floyd Rose: It has an OFR. Once you get used to changing the strings on one, it shouldn't be much of a problem.

Neck: Neck comfort is all about personal preference. Fretboard material and speed don't really correlate, but I like the attack that ebony gives (and it looks sexy).

Body: Mahogany with a flamed maple top gives you plenty of warmth with a nice high end.

Style: Pretty simple.

Looks: I think all the finishes look awesome.

PRICE: It's $670! An absolute steal at that price.
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Quote by utsapp89
^I'd let a pro look at it. Once you get into the technicalities of screws...well, it's just a place you don't want to be, friend.
Last edited by FacingUsAll at Jun 24, 2008,
#4
Try an Ibanez RG, you get them in some classic looking finishes. Also active pickups are muddy sounding, you will notice that most shredders don't use them (hardly anybody does).
Finally Floyd Roses aren't as hard to set up as some people say, but it takes a while to get used to doing it.

Hope that helps
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#5
A nice Schecter (Hellraiser or ATX) or a high-end Ibanez would be what I would reccomend. I have a Schecter Hellraiser FR, and I shred all over that thing. I know for a fact that the hellraiser series is built for speed, but I hear good things about the ATX series as well. The hellraiser FR also meets all of your criteria listed above. I am not as knowledgeable about Ibanez guitars, but I know people who love them (he has a Xiphos). As for battery length of active pickups, I remember reading that they last for up to 800 hours or something riddiculous like that, and the battery only drains while your guitar is plugged in. As for FR's, they're really not such a bitch once you get used to them. Price range of my reccomendations is $700-$850.
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#6
Quote by rossjohnson87
none of those space-age-crazy-I'm-compensating-for-something-I'm-lacking kind of guitars.


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#7
The thing with 24 frets is really whether or not you can reach them. I've seen some bolt-on Jacksons where you have no hope in doing it unless you want to cut your thumb off. Always check fret access. Usually neck-thru have the best, but my guitar (which is a bolt-on) actually has damn good access just 'cause of build quality. I use a PRS CE24 btw.

Actives usually have more gain (EMGs being the popular one) and the batteries usually last a little under a year if you play a few hours every day. I've used some dang good passives that are hot, but actives seem to be the way to go if you want to push them pinch harmonics.

As long as you get it set-up properly, FR shouldn't be a problem, learn it through and through and it's not so bad. Of course you'll scream every time you break a string.

Check out Schecters, ESPs, and Ibanez if you want the trem work. I believe ESP might carry a few that resemble the LP shape. Always check for fret access, and mess around with the pickups a little, don't just max the tone and volume. That's as much as I can give you. Good luck man!

Edit: Oh, and try and test the guitars with other people. You wanna make sure your shredding will cut through the mix!
Last edited by Eminored at Jun 24, 2008,
#8
my ibanez rg420bbs
is pretty gangster
http://www.samash.com/catalog/showitem.asp?itemid=62912&SourceType=RecentItems
24 frets - all really large and easy to hit
floyd rose - it was really confusion before i asked the guy at samash how to do it, now that i know it is easy
looks real pretty
price: now $500 - steal; mine cost almost $600, but still worth it
fast action, real fast
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#9
Quote by rossjohnson87
Alrighty, I'm in the market for a bad ass shred guitar, and well I need some advice from folks who aren't rookies in the field.

Things I'd like/have questions about

24 Frets-A lot of times I'll be rippin it up on my SG and I'll get to my high E 22nd fret and want more, so I'm thinking I'd like the extra two frets. But question: Does they add an extra two frets to the fretboard lengthwise or, just scrunch all of them together more to fit two more on? And if you have any opinions on 24 frets, love em, hate em, etc. lemme know

If the scale length is the same, they will not be closer together. It also depends on the construction of the guitar: some, like the PRS Custom 24, have all 24 frets clear of the body. Most have the frets extending onto the body to where the neck pickup would normally be. The pickup in this case is moved back.
If you think about it, 24 frets aren't absolutely necessary. I mean, if you want 'em, go ahead. But 2 extra notes won't give you that much. Most people that have 24 frets rarely use them.
Pick-ups-I want the hottest ones I can find, right now I struggle to pull off pinch harmonics with my SG, the range to hit them on there is so precise its real easy to miss. I'd like something that gives you a little more room for error, and such. Also, wondering about Active vs. Passive pick-ups. Active are hotter (correct?) but wondering how long batteries last in em, what kind of batteries they take usually and whether or not you recommend them.

Pinch harmonics depend more on technique than pickups. Although hot pickups and a lot of gain does help, you gotta be able to do them properly first. Active pickups are much hotter, and have very strong harmonics. Batteries typically last 3000 hours, according to EMG. They usually take 9V block batteries. The advantage is that you get really strong harmonics, loads of sustain and you can drive the amp hard. However, some say that the clean tone on them sucks, and that they don't respond to your touch as well as passive pickups. The EMG 81 and 85 are everyone's favourites, and many like a EMG 60 in the neck position for clean tones.
Also try Seymour Duncan Blackouts. I hear they're good. They use 2 batteries, though.

DiMarzio have these things called D-Activators, which are passive, but sound just like active pickups, and are actually more dynamically responsive.

Floyd-Rose-At the moment, I am whammy-less, and well, prolly a good thing for when I was starting cause it really helped me develop my vibrato and bends, but I love playing with FR when I get the chance. I hear they are a real bitch to string, and tune (don't quite understand about the tuning part if someone could elaborate) , anything else negative, or positive I guess that you like about em?

If they're well made and set up, they will work great. The thing is, setting them up is indeed a pain, but you don't have to do it very often. Tuning is unusual because they are clamped down at the nut, and you cannot use the machine heads to tune them. That's why you have fine-tuners on the bridge itself. Make sure you get a good floyd, cos some wear out quickly and will be a nightmare. Good ones are made by Jackson, Schaller, high-end Peavey, Fender, Schecter and official Floyd Roses, too.

If you get an Ibanez guitar, AVOID THE EDGE 3 TREMOLO. Everyone here will tell you that it sucks. It'll be fine for the first few months, but then the knife edges wear out and it'll never stay in tune again. Go for a higher-end ibanez with an original Edge or Edge Pro.

Neck: Round vs. Flat- What's the difference? Benefits of one or the other? Only thing I can see from my perspective is that flat might give you a little more finger-stretch range, I guess. And how big of a deal is the material that the neck is made of in terms of speed. I'm talkin bout the types of wood I guess, like is there one that is noticeably better than another?

It's really all about preference. Many will say a "fast" neck is one that is really thin and flat. But then again, neck preferences are very personal, cos everyone's hands and playing styles are different. The best way to find out is to just try them. Sometime's, you'll be surprised. I recently played a guitar with an assymetrical U-shape neck, which sounds horrible, but played amazingly well.
There are no "better" woods for necks. Most necks are maple, anyway. Some are mahogany. It's all down to preference. Maple is used more commonly and is offered in a wide variety of finishes. Some like a satin finish, cos your hand doesn't stick to them.

Body- Same question as the neck for the most part, how do the different types of wood effect your sound?

Common woods are:
Alder - lightweight, gives a fairly balanced tone, perhaps leaning to the brighter side. Used on Fender and Jackson guitars, among others.

Mahogany - Heavy, gives a fat tone with loads of bass and midrange. Used commonly by Gibson and PRS.

Basswood - lightweight, tone wise between alder and mahogany. It's warm-ish, but not as fat as mahogany.

Swamp ash - very lightweight, gives a bright tone.

Northern hard ash - not to be confused with swamp ash. Actually very dense and heavy. Gives a lot of bass and a lot of high end.

Maple - sometimes used for bodies. It is very hard and dense and gives a very bright tone. It is commonly used with mahogany, to balance the warmth with its brightness. It also comes in cool-looking figured varieties, known as "Flame" and "Quilt" maple, but you probably knew that already.

Style-I really like the size of my SG, the smaller body just fits me about perfectly, so any suggestions on a guitar please note the size, whether large, medium or small.

Looks-Haha, I don't want any retarded lookin guitars suggested, none of those space-age-crazy-I'm-compensating-for-something-I'm-lacking kind of guitars. Just stuff that looks like Les Pauls, SG's, Strats, etc. variations on the classic styles.

There are plenty of variations on classic styles. Check out ESP and Jackson. In the end, it's all up to you. It doesn't really make a difference tone wise. What matters is that you like it and will be inspired to play it.

Hope that helps
Last edited by sashki at Jun 24, 2008,
#10
As a general rule, the 23rd and 24th fret make the neck longer. It isn't jus a scrunchin of frets.

Floyd Rose are a bitch to string cuz you have to reset them up every time you string them. However, tho it takes time, it has the advantage of you learnin more bout guitars. BTW, find a tutorial bout em when you first buy a giuitar with a Floyd Rose (provided you choose to buy one with a Floyd Rose). There are other free-floating whammy bar systems out there, but none beat Floyd Rose. NONE!

As far as a round or flat neck, it's personal preference. Which feels better to you? I mainly have round necks. I like em. But you may not.

Different woods make your tone higher or lower. It's like a singer. Let's choose two singers. One has a high voice, and the other has a low voice. Both can hit the same notes. However, when both hit the same note, it sounds different. It's the same with different woods for your guitar. It changes the tone.


Ask me if you have any more questions. Jus pm me.

P. S.: To all you assholes who suggest guitars with answerin any questions, how are you helpin? He wants answers, not a guitar without any reason why it fits his parameters. Read the damn posts first.
#12
i've heard kahler are good whammy bars
but they don't come cheap accordingly
floyd rose are know to have problems with tuning
#13
Quote by rossjohnson87

24 Frets-A lot of times I'll be rippin it up on my SG and I'll get to my high E 22nd fret and want more, so I'm thinking I'd like the extra two frets. But question: Does they add an extra two frets to the fretboard lengthwise or, just scrunch all of them together more to fit two more on? And if you have any opinions on 24 frets, love em, hate em, etc. lemme know


Well, 24 frets aren't really that useful; it's not like you couldn't manage with 22, they are handy sometimes, though. However, if there's a huge gap in neck joint between the guitar's body and the neck, the access to these frets is very hard, if not impossible.

Pick-ups-I want the hottest ones I can find, right now I struggle to pull off pinch harmonics with my SG, the range to hit them on there is so precise its real easy to miss. I'd like something that gives you a little more room for error, and such. Also, wondering about Active vs. Passive pick-ups. Active are hotter (correct?) but wondering how long batteries last in em, what kind of batteries they take usually and whether or not you recommend them.


I wouldn't really suggest active pickups. Sure, they have more output and give you maybe a bit better distortion but they lack in tonal qualities when compared to passive pickups, especially the clean sound is not very pleasing. Check out DiMarzio and John Suhr pickups for high output and great tonal range.

Floyd-Rose-At the moment, I am whammy-less, and well, prolly a good thing for when I was starting cause it really helped me develop my vibrato and bends, but I love playing with FR when I get the chance. I hear they are a real bitch to string, and tune (don't quite understand about the tuning part if someone could elaborate) , anything else negative, or positive I guess that you like about em?


Floyd Rose is only useful if you do a lot of crazy whammy stuff. It's a pain in the ass if you want to change tuning or if you break a string during a live performance. The also lack the stronger sustain and sound that fixed bridges with strings through body have.

Neck: Round vs. Flat- What's the difference? Benefits of one or the other? Only thing I can see from my perspective is that flat might give you a little more finger-stretch range, I guess. And how big of a deal is the material that the neck is made of in terms of speed. I'm talkin bout the types of wood I guess, like is there one that is noticeably better than another?


It depends on what kind of necks you like, personally I don't like very thin necks. Although if you have very small hands you might want to consider a thinner neck. The neck doesn't really affect your speed, there's a lot of variation when you look at what necks different shredders are using. The neck wood affects the sound the same as the body wood.

Body- Same question as the neck for the most part, how do the different types of wood effect your sound?


From brightest sound to warmest: Ash, Alder, Basswood, Koa, Mahogany.

Style-I really like the size of my SG, the smaller body just fits me about perfectly, so any suggestions on a guitar please note the size, whether large, medium or small.

Looks-Haha, I don't want any retarded lookin guitars suggested, none of those space-age-crazy-I'm-compensating-for-something-I'm-lacking kind of guitars. Just stuff that looks like Les Pauls, SG's, Strats, etc. variations on the classic styles.


Ibanez RG and Ibanez S Prestige are definitely worth checking out.
#14
PRESTIGE IBANEZ S SERIES!

Seriously, 24 fret S series is a perfect guitar, but with added frets.

http://ibanez.com/eg/series.aspx?s=s_prestige
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#17
Quote by COBHC728
A nice Schecter (Hellraiser or ATX) or a high-end Ibanez would be what I would reccomend. I have a Schecter Hellraiser FR, and I shred all over that thing. I know for a fact that the hellraiser series is built for speed, but I hear good things about the ATX series as well. The hellraiser FR also meets all of your criteria listed above. I am not as knowledgeable about Ibanez guitars, but I know people who love them (he has a Xiphos). As for battery length of active pickups, I remember reading that they last for up to 800 hours or something riddiculous like that, and the battery only drains while your guitar is plugged in. As for FR's, they're really not such a bitch once you get used to them. Price range of my reccomendations is $700-$850.


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#18
Floyd Rose are a bitch to string cuz you have to reset them up every time you string them


No you don't. Only if you switch string guage or brand.
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#19
Quote by turtlewax
No you don't. Only if you switch string guage or brand.

...which, believe it or not, some people like to do, especially when you've just bought the guitar and are re-stringing it for the first time.

I'd take it to the shop and get a pro to set it up the first time, and then it's easy to restring yourself once it's set up.
#20
Quote by Metallist65
There are other free-floating whammy bar systems out there, but none beat Floyd Rose. NONE!


Ah, that'd explain why suhr have changed to Gotohs from OFRs, then...
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#21
which, believe it or not, some people like to do, especially when you've just bought the guitar and are re-stringing it for the first time.


I was never disputing that
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