#1
please help me

alright correct me if i am wrong.
lets say your playing a e minor chord you should use the e minor pentatonic scale right?
ok well here's my problem how would you use that but in a chord progression would you use the same scale for every chord or keep changing scales?

sorry if that was confusing
#2
If the key of the progression is E minor, use the E minor scale. There are other methods of writing music, but these are far too advanced at this point.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#3
Quote by Archeo Avis
If the key of the progression is E minor, use the E minor scale. There are other methods of writing music, but these are far too advanced at this point.


alright, well could you tell me of other methods?
#4
Yeah, if the chord progression is in the same key you may use the same scale, which in this case is Eminor. If you don't understand this key business I'm talking about then that's where you need to start.
#5
Quote by snider52
alright, well could you tell me of other methods?


A deep understanding of counterpoint and harmonic theory. The kind of thing people go to school for years to learn.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#6
Quote by confusius
Yeah, if the chord progression is in the same key you may use the same scale, which in this case is Eminor. If you don't understand this key business I'm talking about then that's where you need to start.


thanks, yea i got the key stuff down
#7
Quote by snider52
ok well here's my problem how would you use that but in a chord progression would you use the same scale for every chord or keep changing scales?
Most of the time you will play the same scale. For instance, over Em D C, you would just play Em the whole time. However, over Em D C B7, you would play Em over the first three chords and then E HARMONIC (E F# G A B C D#, 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 7) minor over B7 since B7 contains the D# note. Of course, when I say Em, I mean E natural minor or minor pentatonic.
#8
Quote by Archeo Avis
A deep understanding of counterpoint and harmonic theory. The kind of thing people go to school for years to learn.


That's an exaggeration; you don't need to learn about counterpoint in detail to set a melody to a simple chord progression.
#9
^it helps
Quote by snider52
ok well here's my problem how would you use that but in a chord progression would you use the same scale for every chord or keep changing scales?
When you first start writing I would suggest writing simple progressions. You only need to use one scale when writing simple progressions.

But later you might want to write more interesting and original progressions. Such progressions might use out of key chords, tritone substitutions, secondary dominants, borrowed chords and other oddities. You would need to change scales in the majority of these situations. The scale really depends on your progression.


And BTW, minor scales entails alot of complexities. If your writing (as opposed to improvising) with the minor scale it means your resolving your progression on the minor chord. To do this *usually* (sometimes you dont need to) means to use a couple out of key chords so the progression would have more of a pull towards the right minor chord than to the relative major chord.
You can still improvise using the minor scale though.