#1
So I've gathered from discussions here that if one has unintentional string noise/ringing while playing a lick or something, it's considered sloppy. I was watching this marty friedman video someone posted in the adv. technique section, though, and in the licks he was playing I could deinitely hear some unintentional string ringing on just about every lick he played. He's definitely one of the most skilled guitarists alive, and you'd have to be pretty crazy to call him sloppy. So what's your opinion on that?
#2
dont confuse harmonics with accidentally hitting other strings

Guitar : Fender CIJ Mustang and a Telecaster
Amp : 76 fender champ
Pedals : BBE green screamer, Big muff, Ibanez LU20 Pedal Tuner, boss loop pedal
#6
Quote by Spamwise
They weren't harmonics.

post vid plz ^_^

Guitar : Fender CIJ Mustang and a Telecaster
Amp : 76 fender champ
Pedals : BBE green screamer, Big muff, Ibanez LU20 Pedal Tuner, boss loop pedal
#9
sounded clean too me except 1 part anyways it reminded me of mario bros music :P

Guitar : Fender CIJ Mustang and a Telecaster
Amp : 76 fender champ
Pedals : BBE green screamer, Big muff, Ibanez LU20 Pedal Tuner, boss loop pedal
#11
Yeah i can hear some noise, almost sounds like resonance on the other strings. I dunno, but wouldnt call it sloppy, he wasnt hitting strings accidentally.
#12
It's cause of the way he picks - his hand is behind/under the strings instead of on top of them (where they'd be muted).
Quote by Roc8995
Thin necks make you play faster because guitars with thin necks sound thin and bad, and you play fast to distract people from the bad tone.
#13
Marty is one of my favorite players, but he is pretty sloppy. Not ragging on him- it contributes to his recognizable style, but he is. It probably has to do with his left and right hand technique.
#14
Quote by Spamwise
So I've gathered from discussions here that if one has unintentional string noise/ringing while playing a lick or something, it's considered sloppy. I was watching this marty friedman video someone posted in the adv. technique section, though, and in the licks he was playing I could deinitely hear some unintentional string ringing on just about every lick he played. He's definitely one of the most skilled guitarists alive, and you'd have to be pretty crazy to call him sloppy. So what's your opinion on that?



keep in mind MOST if not all guitarists have that issue to some extent, its just you don't hear it in a recording with everything else going on.

also no disrespect intended but there are thousands of not hundreds of thousands of living guitarists that are as skilled as Marty Friedman.

Quote by nemesis65
everything friedman plays is intentional...even when he hits bad notes


I don't think that is entirely true. You must be a serious fan of his to think that way. he is a person like anyone else and does make unintentional mistakes. He would probably admit that sooner than you would.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jun 24, 2008,
#15
Quote by GuitarMunky
keep in mind MOST if not all guitarists have that issue to some extent, its just you don't hear it in a recording with everything else going on.
They also have the advantage of many takes and fixing a second-long passage of a song if (when) they screw up.


Intentional could mean that he screwed up but thought it added character or feel to the song and left it in rather than redoing it.
#16
Quote by bangoodcharlote
They also have the advantage of many takes and fixing a second-long passage of a song if (when) they screw up.


Intentional could mean that he screwed up but thought it added character or feel to the song and left it in rather than redoing it.



yep, very true.
shred is gaudy music
#17
i just watched part of the first vid (patterns 1-4 i think) but i didn't hear any excess string noise....
#18
that's why most metal guitarists use heavy distortion and high gain. It masks all the extra noise, this isn't to rag on metal guitarists, but rapid picking and a fast fret hand make it nearly impossible to have only the intended notes ringing. Jimmy Page was also quite sloppy, the most important thing is being able to keep rhythm and the flow of a song. Here are 2 very accomplished guitarists playing with a little sloppiness here and there:

http://youtube.com/watch?v=27YaZMam1OY

http://youtube.com/watch?v=WpDblDia5TE
#19
Quote by farcry
that's why most metal guitarists use heavy distortion and high gain. It masks all the extra noise
I find that it amplifies the mistakes just as often as it hides them.

If you hit a semi harmonic without heavy distortion, you don't really hear anything. Hit it with heavy distortion, and the neighbors think Zakk Wylde's moving in.
#20
It amplifies the harmonic effect because of the resonance of the harmonics. It's almost necessary to have a high gain to get the squeal from harmonics. From what I've seen a distorted sound helps muffle fret buzz and the sound of fingers sliding around on the coiled springs, those 2 are probably the cause of most extra noise.
#23
Quote by farcry
I was thinking clean electric vs. high gain electric
I can get them on an unplugged electric, which I see as basically an acoustic guitar anyway.
#26
Quote by kd420
Yeah i can hear some noise, almost sounds like resonance on the other strings. I dunno, but wouldnt call it sloppy, he wasnt hitting strings accidentally.


this.

this usually only happens when playing power chords on lower strings, but sometimes the higher strings will resonate creating unwanted noise. In which case i have to play power chords with a light first finger barre for example to mute the extra noise. (yea my amp is close to me when i play )
Jackson DKMG Dinky, Ibanez RG 7321, Ibanez RG 350EX
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#28
Quote by CowboyUp
It probably has to do with his left and right hand technique.

Hehe that's funny. What other technique is there apart from left and right hand?
#29
Quote by farcry
that's why most metal guitarists use heavy distortion and high gain. It masks all the extra noise, this isn't to rag on metal guitarists, but rapid picking and a fast fret hand make it nearly impossible to have only the intended notes ringing. Jimmy Page was also quite sloppy, the most important thing is being able to keep rhythm and the flow of a song. Here are 2 very accomplished guitarists playing with a little sloppiness here and there:

http://youtube.com/watch?v=27YaZMam1OY

http://youtube.com/watch?v=WpDblDia5TE

+1 to page being sloppy but godly