#1
Ive been studying chord embellishments lately, and i've run into a couple things that I am confused about.

Could somebody explain to me all of the possible chord embellishments within the major scale, natural minor scale and harmonic minor as well as how they relate to each of the triads of each scale.

How important is it to know extended chords such as 11th and 13th chords? How often are they used?

When can you use augmented chords? I see that in the harmonic minor, the III+ chord is augmented, but I have read that III chord is always used instead of III+.

I would also like to be referred to a couple of good theory books. I currently have only Fingerboard theory for guitar by mel bay. For the most part i think it is a good book but it is becoming vague about chord embellishments (doesn't explain how to embellish a vi chord for example) and modes. I would like books that teach me about chord progressions/embellishing chords, modes, and books about jazz and blues guitar.

I know I'm asking alot, thanks
#2
Quote by greekorican5
I know I'm asking alot, thanks

Yes , Yes you are
Livin For the Music


dimebag420666 wrote:

i play guitar with my penis
#3
Quote by greekorican5
Could somebody explain to me all of the possible chord embellishments within the major scale, natural minor scale and harmonic minor as well as how they relate to each of the triads of each scale.
There are too many possibilities to list, but I will give an example that will allow you to figure out the rest when you need to. I'll assume that you understand the theory link in my sig as well. If you ask me what an interval is or a scale formula, I will probably throw a pen across my room, but make a nice post telling you to read my link again.

C D E F G A B: The C major scale.

The C chord is composed of the first, third, and fifth notes of the scale, C E G. If you add B, the seventh, you get Cmaj7. If from that Cmaj7 chord, you add D, the 2nd (or ninth), you get Cmaj9 (never use 2). If from that Cmaj7 chord you add the A note, you get Cmaj13 (see the pattern?). If from the bare C chord, you add a D note, you get Cadd9. If you add the A note, you get C6, and C with an F is Cadd4.

So name the following chords as an exercise. I will list the root first.

1. F A C E D

2. G B D F A

3. E G B A

4. E G B D A

5. A C E G

6. A C E G B

7. A C E B

Bonus:
8. E G# B D F# C#

9. A C E G# B

10. C E G# Bb D#

I expect you to fail miserably on the last three, so it's fine if you have no idea. However, do give an educated guess. Leave none of them blank and have some rationale for your answers because I want you to defend each answer as well (ie none of this "I guessed" nonsense).

Good luck!

Quote by CLaSH88
Yes , Yes you are

*Reported*
#4
How important is it to know extended chords such as 11th and 13th chords? How often are they used?
They aren't used very often, but it doesn't hurt to know how they are formed.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#5
Quote by bangoodcharlote
10. C E G# Bb D#

Not going to intentionally give out answers BGC, but I couldn't help noticing you put two sharps and a flat into the chord. Shouldn't it technically be A#?
#6
^The name depends on how it functions. That is a dominant chord, so Bb is the minor seventh, not an augmented sixth.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#7
Quote by st.stephen
Not going to intentionally give out answers BGC, but I couldn't help noticing you put two sharps and a flat into the chord. Shouldn't it technically be A#?

I see why she did that; no, that should be Bb.

I was beaten to this post, though.
#8
Yeah ok I figured as much, thanks for clearing that up, I guess with real music you throw the "rules" out the window.
#9
Quote by st.stephen
Yeah ok I figured as much, thanks for clearing that up, I guess with real music you throw the "rules" out the window.
Rules about note-naming and nomenclature always apply.

You can absolutely mix sharps and flats in a scale or chord. The chord I posted is spelled correctly (correct note sames). How else would you write the G harmonic minor scale?


And D, I did that to show some alterations. Is that what you thought I meant or no? Please PM me.
#11
Quote by bangoodcharlote


Bonus:
8. E G# B D F# C#

9. A C E G# B

10. C E G# Bb D#


I'm trying these just for fun. I'm not going to give away answers. A question comes to mind that I thought of earlier today... and I didn't want to make a whole thread on it. How do you notate the omission of a note in a chord name. Say I want the player to omit a 5th (for example), would I just write EMaj7-5? Or EMaj7(5)?
I think I've seen it done one of the two ways, but I don't remember. Thanks.
#12
There's no way in hell I'm even going to try and list them all. You may like this link though (it basically does):

http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/scales-to-chords.php
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#13
Awesome link. I started working out the chords in the F scale figuring them out and writing them down but now I can cheat!! And wow there are a lot of scales and modes to choose from I haven't heard of more than half of them.
#14
^If it's a good guitar site (or .pdf), i probably have a link to it.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#15
Quote by one vision
I'm trying these just for fun. I'm not going to give away answers. A question comes to mind that I thought of earlier today... and I didn't want to make a whole thread on it. How do you notate the omission of a note in a chord name. Say I want the player to omit a 5th (for example), would I just write EMaj7-5? Or EMaj7(5)?
I think I've seen it done one of the two ways, but I don't remember. Thanks.


Im not sure but I think the first 'Emaj7-5' would imply a flat 5, rather than omission.
#16
Quote by greekorican5
Ive been studying chord embellishments lately, and i've run into a couple things that I am confused about.

Could somebody explain to me all of the possible chord embellishments within the major scale, natural minor scale and harmonic minor as well as how they relate to each of the triads of each scale.

How important is it to know extended chords such as 11th and 13th chords? How often are they used?

When can you use augmented chords? I see that in the harmonic minor, the III+ chord is augmented, but I have read that III chord is always used instead of III+.

I would also like to be referred to a couple of good theory books. I currently have only Fingerboard theory for guitar by mel bay. For the most part i think it is a good book but it is becoming vague about chord embellishments (doesn't explain how to embellish a vi chord for example) and modes. I would like books that teach me about chord progressions/embellishing chords, modes, and books about jazz and blues guitar.

I know I'm asking alot, thanks


Sup... scroll to post #10 of this link below, hopefully that may help with your question abour chord embellishment.

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?p=14483856#post14483856
#18
Quote by one vision
I'm pretty sure that a flat 5 is Emaj7b5.
Emaj7#5=Emaj7+5

Both ways are correct.


Omissions are not notated as far as I know. A C G B is Am9, even though there's no E note.
#19
Quote by greekorican5


When can you use augmented chords? I see that in the harmonic minor, the III+ chord is augmented, but I have read that III chord is always used instead of III+.


I know I'm asking alot, thanks


Well, the augmented III is an option when writing in harmonic minor. It borrows from the relative major and adds 'color' to your progression.

You read wrong; though III is used most often, the III+ can be a pretty usefull embellishment in some cases.
#20
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Emaj7#5=Emaj7+5

Both ways are correct.


Omissions are not notated as far as I know. A C G B is Am9, even though there's no E note.

Okay, thanks. It doesn't really matter in a 7th chord anyways, I can't even think of any other omissions, all other situations with "missing notes", I would use add chords or something.
#21
Quote by bangoodcharlote

*Reported*

Wow some one doesn't have a sense of humour

Livin For the Music


dimebag420666 wrote:

i play guitar with my penis
#22
Quote by CLaSH88
Wow some one doesn't have a sense of humour
Someone doesn't tolerate people spamming the forums when they've contributed nothing to this website.


And someone else won't have access to this website if he keeps up his behavior.
#23
First of all, you must have a huge ego to talk about yourself in third person like that.
Secondly I don’t see what it’s got to do with you, I mean I don’t hear Greekorican5 b1tching but hey if it makes you happy and fulfils your life then go ahead b1tch some more, get me banned, I don’t care because seriously I don’t want to be a member of a community where a small friendly, inoffensive joke can you get you banned
Livin For the Music


dimebag420666 wrote:

i play guitar with my penis