#1
I can't break the habit of when I'm changing chords, I put one finger on a string first for a reference point, then put the remaining fingers in the other strings on the fretboard. I just need a refrence point before I know where to put my fingers on the other strings.

How do I break this habit because I've seen people create a chord by putting all fingers on the strings all at once very quickly. How do I go about doing this?

Thank you!
Last edited by DominoK at Jun 25, 2008,
#2
practice is all i can say, the chord shape just has to be locked in your muscle memory and you have to be know where you are on the neck without looking. maybe try practicing with your eyes closed?


(oh yea, wrong use of brake. brake is like the pedal you use to stop or slow down, break is like breaking glass [or a habit])
#3
Take the easiest route possible. If you're playing an open G (320003) and you're switching to an open G7 (320001) keep your fingers on the notes that are the same and switch only the ones that are different. Don't automatically take your entire hand off the fretboard. It takes a lot of practice, don't get discouraged.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

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#4
I'm just gonna say practice. Try and do some tricky chord changes for a beginner like G to D to Am. Like The4thHorsemen said, it's all about muscle memory.

And when people use all their fingers, it's called a Barre chord. It doesn't sound like you need to worry about those yet. Once you got the open chords down, try and move onto those.
I can honestly say I have really been far even as decided to use even go want to do look more like.


I don't always post on UG, but when I do, I post in the Pit. Stay thirsty my friends.
#5
you have to practise the chords really slowly before you try to speed the change up.
Try this method.
You make the chord shape but don't press it down just touch the strings lightly.
Then you press down. remember slowly.
Then you take the pressure of so that your touching again.
Then you release so that you are hovering about 1 cm away from the strings. But you have to keep your hand in the chord position when your hovering.
Then you repeat. Touch, Press, Touch, Release.

The good thing about this is that you can see the muscle memory working, cos you'll find that when you are hovering over the strings your hand will be shaking.
#6
Quote by metal4all
Take the easiest route possible. If you're playing an open G (320003) and you're switching to an open G7 (320001) keep your fingers on the notes that are the same and switch only the ones that are different. Don't automatically take your entire hand off the fretboard. It takes a lot of practice, don't get discouraged.


+1. Also, try the other idea that was suggested about closing your eyes and practicing forming chord shapes.
You are like a hurricane
There's calm in your eye.
And I'm gettin' blown away
To somewhere safer
where the feeling stays.
I want to love you but
I'm getting blown away.
#7
One of my students is having trouble with this. Every lesson we work on this together. Basically, I have her repeat the chord move... Repetition is the key. Also, we find common fingerings between the chords. Usually all the open chords have them because they're generally in the same area. If we have common fingerings, we don't have to move as many notes around.
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