#1
I've been feeling the need to actually write a song lately, but seeing as how I suck horribly with lyrics, I decided to write an instrumental. So far I've got close to like 10 licks, but I have no idea how to piece them together

I dont know much theory, barely enough to get by here....but I really want to write it. I've written some pretty cool stuff, it's the piecing it together that's getting me.

Dont tell me "Learn Music Theory" Because I am. I'm still learning, but I dont know much.

Help would be greatly appreciated, mainly tips and such on writing instrumentals

Thanks!

My things:
Bowes SLx7
Washburn WG587
Washburn X40Pro
Washburn X50
Washburn HM24
Washburn WR150
Laguna LE200s
Arietta Acoustic
First Act
Valveking 112
VHT Deliverance

#2
Honestly the best way to go about this is just to record it all almost improv'd together then go over it and keep refining it, thats what i usually do.
#3
Melody-Harmony-Rhythm, or Melody-Accompaniment
Try following one of those two "formulas" when writing instrumental music. Write out all the riffs you want to use (try to, if possible, keep them in the same key), then write one or more things "underneath" to either support it (like chords) or keep pulse (like a moving bassline).

It's worked for everything but jazz for me.
'89 MIJ Fender Strat
Rivera S-120
'60s PEPCO Model 211 5w head
'60s Paul (Pepco) 1x12 tube amp
'60s Harmony H303a 1x10 tube amp
#4
if you know a little bit about theory, you should know about key's... if all of the riffs are in the same Key... then you just need to scramble em together and play them.... if they aren't in the same key, then you need to either raise or lower the riff's so they fall within the same key.. you can also then play a simple chord progression in the same key as the riffs to make it a more full sounding song...
#5
The strange part is.....I can never tell what Key they're in

They're all ascending/descending shapes, hammer on and pull off things on the strings. They vary from very fast, to really slow (think Wishful Thinking slow).

But, I can try to figure it out.

So I should think of a Melody first, right?

My things:
Bowes SLx7
Washburn WG587
Washburn X40Pro
Washburn X50
Washburn HM24
Washburn WR150
Laguna LE200s
Arietta Acoustic
First Act
Valveking 112
VHT Deliverance

#6
Yes, it is (at least for me) easier to put a bottom, so to speak, to a melody then vice-versa. I advise using powertab editor or Guitar Pro (power tab editor if you're cheap), it makes it a lot easier to see what exactly is going on. But you do have to know a decent amount of knowledge of rhythms (Whole, half, quarter, 8th notes, etc).
'89 MIJ Fender Strat
Rivera S-120
'60s PEPCO Model 211 5w head
'60s Paul (Pepco) 1x12 tube amp
'60s Harmony H303a 1x10 tube amp
#7
Alright, well lemme tell you how I do it.

For one, I use Guitar Pro like the other guy suggested. I originally used Power-Tab until my friend sent me a cracked copy of Guitar Pro and now I use that for all my composing.

Basically, I come up with a riff, then work out the tempo and rhythm and stuff and put it into Guitar Pro. Then, I play the riff using Guitar Pro, and listen to it in my head. Then I try to hear in my head what other parts should play with that part, and what should come next. So then when I've got an idea for another part (drum part, keyboard line, bass line, whatever) I go to that track and try to transcribe my idea into it, then play it back and see if it sounds like what I imagined in my head. If it doesn't, I keep fiddling until I've got it to sound just like I wanted it to. If it does and it sucks, then I change parts around until I've got something I'm happy with. Once I'm happy with that part, I listen to that part with all the other parts and see how it fits. If it doesn't fit, I go back and change it. If it does, great, and I move onto writing the next section.

I then repeat that process pretty much until I've written a song. Note that I pretty much never finish my songs, just start them. However, that way of doing it seems to work pretty well for me. So I'd say that the most important thing (for me anyway) is to hear the riff in my head and then hear the other parts and write them into Guitar Pro. The reason I do it this way is because I can hear all the parts at the same time, and there's no technical limitations. Of course, the problem with this is then I half to learn to play my own songs. And sometimes they're pretty damn hard.

So anyway, give that a shot, and I hope that helps you. I just find it easier to listen to a riff and then write what I think should come next, than to write a bunch of random, unconnected riffs and then try to connect them together.
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#8
Quote by Skater901
Alright, well lemme tell you how I do it.

For one, I use Guitar Pro like the other guy suggested. I originally used Power-Tab until my friend sent me a cracked copy of Guitar Pro and now I use that for all my composing.

Basically, I come up with a riff, then work out the tempo and rhythm and stuff and put it into Guitar Pro. Then, I play the riff using Guitar Pro, and listen to it in my head. Then I try to hear in my head what other parts should play with that part, and what should come next. So then when I've got an idea for another part (drum part, keyboard line, bass line, whatever) I go to that track and try to transcribe my idea into it, then play it back and see if it sounds like what I imagined in my head. If it doesn't, I keep fiddling until I've got it to sound just like I wanted it to. If it does and it sucks, then I change parts around until I've got something I'm happy with. Once I'm happy with that part, I listen to that part with all the other parts and see how it fits. If it doesn't fit, I go back and change it. If it does, great, and I move onto writing the next section.

I then repeat that process pretty much until I've written a song. Note that I pretty much never finish my songs, just start them. However, that way of doing it seems to work pretty well for me. So I'd say that the most important thing (for me anyway) is to hear the riff in my head and then hear the other parts and write them into Guitar Pro. The reason I do it this way is because I can hear all the parts at the same time, and there's no technical limitations. Of course, the problem with this is then I half to learn to play my own songs. And sometimes they're pretty damn hard.

So anyway, give that a shot, and I hope that helps you. I just find it easier to listen to a riff and then write what I think should come next, than to write a bunch of random, unconnected riffs and then try to connect them together.


Yeah, I have Guitar Pro my friend did the same thing and I normally just use it for learning songs. I will do that though, sounds like a really good idea. I always find that I improv better when I'm going along with a piano or synth line for some reason

Thank you for the advice, anyone else, feel free to add on to this, I want to make this instrumental perfect (from my pov )

Thank you!

My things:
Bowes SLx7
Washburn WG587
Washburn X40Pro
Washburn X50
Washburn HM24
Washburn WR150
Laguna LE200s
Arietta Acoustic
First Act
Valveking 112
VHT Deliverance