#1
I have been playing for almost 3 years now have a broad knowledge of theory. I know how to form the diatonic scales have 3 memorized, as well as knowing the pentatonic scale, know the pentatonic scale. Have an understanding of how modes work, Have and understanding of cadences and progressions, can read sheet music (slowly) know basic time signatures although have problems getting a time sig right just by reading it. And Have an understanding of Major minor dimished augmented chords. Would i know enough about theory to survive a introductory to theory at a university level? If not what should i focus on learning.
#4
Quote by jesus is punk N
I have been playing for almost 3 years now have a broad knowledge of theory. I know how to form the diatonic scales have 3 memorized, as well as knowing the pentatonic scale, know the pentatonic scale. Have an understanding of how modes work, Have and understanding of cadences and progressions, can read sheet music (slowly) know basic time signatures although have problems getting a time sig right just by reading it. And Have an understanding of Major minor dimished augmented chords. Would i know enough about theory to survive a introductory to theory at a university level? If not what should i focus on learning.


I suppose it's all relative...

I too know all of the aspects of theory you are familiar with. Yet you say you have a "broad knowledge of theory" where I would say "I don't know jack ishh about theory"...

To answer your original question, I've taken university theory courses and I'd say yes for it. You said introductory courses, and they are meant to be just what the name implies. Some people will have no theory knowledge and come out ok. It's all about your willingness to learn.

Good luck!

-James
#6
Quote by jesus is punk N
I have been playing for almost 3 years now have a broad knowledge of theory. I know how to form the diatonic scales have 3 memorized, as well as knowing the pentatonic scale, know the pentatonic scale. Have an understanding of how modes work, Have and understanding of cadences and progressions, can read sheet music (slowly) know basic time signatures although have problems getting a time sig right just by reading it. And Have an understanding of Major minor dimished augmented chords. Would i know enough about theory to survive a introductory to theory at a university level? If not what should i focus on learning.
I'll give you a quize....

What is this mode (A, B, C, D, E, F, G) when played over a static Eminor chord.

What are the accepted stresses of 5/4 timing.

What chords do diminished chords move best to.

What chords are generally used in minor progressions.

Leave these questions for the T/S guys...
#7
Introductory as in Music 101? You don't have to know anything about theory to be in a beginning theory class.
#8
If its introduction to muisc theory you shouldnt have to know anything other then basic music reading.
#9
Quote by demonofthenight
I'll give you a quize....

What is this mode (A, B, C, D, E, F, G) when played over a static Eminor chord.

What are the accepted stresses of 5/4 timing.

What chords do diminished chords move best to.

What chords are generally used in minor progressions.

Leave these questions for the T/S guys...

Dam i cant really awnser any of those off the top of my head
#10
can i try?

TS dont read this bit!


What is this mode (A, B, C, D, E, F, G) when played over a static Eminor chord.dorian

What are the accepted stresses of 5/4 timing. 3,5

What chords do diminished chords move best to. minor a tone below or major semitone above

What chords are generally used in minor progressions.major resolving on a minor
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Tell me what nation on this earth, was not born of tragedy-Primordial
#12
Quote by Eggmond
can i try?

TS dont read this bit!


What is this mode (A, B, C, D, E, F, G) when played over a static Eminor chord.dorian

What are the accepted stresses of 5/4 timing. 3,5

What chords do diminished chords move best to. minor a tone below or major semitone above

What chords are generally used in minor progressions.major resolving on a minor
Oh lawd...

I'll pm you the answers
#13
Quote by Nims
I suppose it's all relative...

I too know all of the aspects of theory you are familiar with. Yet you say you have a "broad knowledge of theory" where I would say "I don't know jack ishh about theory"...

To answer your original question, I've taken university theory courses and I'd say yes for it. You said introductory courses, and they are meant to be just what the name implies. Some people will have no theory knowledge and come out ok. It's all about your willingness to learn.

Good luck!

-James


Exactly what I was thinking, also I have an understanding of theory aspects, but it doesn't mean that I understand them inside out and can translate it to song writing. My advice is if you are persuing going to University for Music, is get as many books that you can find by respectible music teachers (ask around), and just read, even if you think you understand something (as i have done, though I understood Diatonic Harmony recently, but needed to go through it all again) read it again. Judging by what you've said I'm kind of at the same point as you. I would't think I know that much at the minute though as James said also. I don't know, just keep learning, don't rest on your laurels with what you already know (don't let what you know impress you) learn MOAR!!
#18
Quote by Guitar_Theory
Most of them are written like math textbooks. The best theory classes I've taken used no textbook.
For people who havent finished high school, it is very difficult to find a good theory class. The year 12's at my school have just started learning the formula of the pentatonic scale.
#19
Quote by demonofthenight
I'll give you a quize....

What are the accepted stresses of 5/4 timing.


Leave these questions for the T/S guys...


#20
Quote by demonofthenight
For people who havent finished high school, it is very difficult to find a good theory class. The year 12's at my school have just started learning the formula of the pentatonic scale.



Luckily my high school had theory classes for 10, 11th, and 12th grade.

Well really it was 3 levels of theory, and you could test out of the first and second ones. I only ever knew one kid that tested out of level two, which got up into common-practice era style 4-part chorale writing. Level three, called "Music Scholars" was all analysis of full scores. My year we did Stravinsky's Rite of Spring, Handel's "Messiah", Mozart's 40th symphony, and Tchaikovsky's 6th Symphony in Bminor. By that point we were doing a fair deal of solfege work too, but most of our time was listening to pieces and analyzing the scores harmonic progressions, finding interesting things the composer would do. It was a very free form class for us that year since there were only 8 of us. I'm told now it's very regimented.
#21
Quote by Guitar_Theory
Luckily my high school had theory classes for 10, 11th, and 12th grade.

Well really it was 3 levels of theory, and you could test out of the first and second ones. I only ever knew one kid that tested out of level two, which got up into common-practice era style 4-part chorale writing. Level three, called "Music Scholars" was all analysis of full scores. My year we did Stravinsky's Rite of Spring, Handel's "Messiah", Mozart's 40th symphony, and Tchaikovsky's 6th Symphony in Bminor. By that point we were doing a fair deal of solfege work too, but most of our time was listening to pieces and analyzing the scores harmonic progressions, finding interesting things the composer would do. It was a very free form class for us that year since there were only 8 of us. I'm told now it's very regimented.
Great for you.

My year 10 music class was spent learning the notes of the major scale and rhthymic/melodic dictation. A whole year of major scales and dictation, very fun.
#22
Quote by demonofthenight
Great for you.

My year 10 music class was spent learning the notes of the major scale and rhthymic/melodic dictation. A whole year of major scales and dictation, very fun.



Was your class more geared towards classical musicians or not?

Ours kinda started out where it was thought only the classical kids would do it, but as time passed, it really turned into a class full of guitarists and rock/jazz kids. Something I never really would have expected to happen.
#23
What the hell? You guys HAD music theory classes! We have uh...music appreciation and there is NO theory taught in just about any of our band classes(well like, reading music). I don't know where I'd be without MT and the rest of the internet... Guess it could be worse though. We have a pretty epic band program.
#24
Quote by grampastumpy
What the hell? You guys HAD music theory classes! We have uh...music appreciation and there is NO theory taught in just about any of our band classes(well like, reading music). I don't know where I'd be without MT and the rest of the internet... Guess it could be worse though. We have a pretty epic band program.

Amen to that.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

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#27
Quote by grampastumpy
What the hell? You guys HAD music theory classes! We have uh...music appreciation and there is NO theory taught in just about any of our band classes(well like, reading music). I don't know where I'd be without MT and the rest of the internet... Guess it could be worse though. We have a pretty epic band program.
Trust me. I learnt more in a month of being ridiculed by MT regulars than in a year of my year 10 music class. Thank you MT. Thanks for the sarcasm and humiliation.
#28
Quote by demonofthenight
Trust me. I learnt more in a month of being ridiculed by MT regulars than in a year of my year 10 music class. Thank you MT. Thanks for the sarcasm and humiliation.
Fair enough.

That would've been the easiest A ever though...