#1
I know in the ideal situation a drum mic set would be the best way to go about this but I dont have this. What I do have is a behringer patch bay and 2 mics, one of which is an sm57. theres also a crappy kareoke (sp?) available if needed.

Whats the best way to mic up a kit using the equipment stated above?

Thanks
#2
for my band we only use 1 mic.. after a bunch of expirimentation, we found that the best way to record it is to put the mic pointed down above his right shoulder near the floor tom.. this is of course for a righty...

you can hear the drum tracks in my band's songs to see how it sounded if you like.. www.myspace.com/themakeshift4

he's not the greatest drummer, he kinda sucks, but you can hear how one mic recording sounds
#3
Well, a patch bay won't really help you here. Do you have any kind of audio interface to get the signal to your computer?
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#5
In that situation I would use the two mics as overheads then go back and overdub the kick with that miced. you might wanna overdub the snare and the hi hat that way too.
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#6
^ I wouldn't try that unless your drummer is really, really tight. I think the best course of action would be to try a pair of overheads, experimenting with the placement to get the best sound. If you can only work with what you have, I'd just try and get as good a sound possible from the 57, experimenting with placement.

You'll be severely limited though.
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#7
Quote by fridge_raider
^ I wouldn't try that unless your drummer is really, really tight. I think the best course of action would be to try a pair of overheads, experimenting with the placement to get the best sound. If you can only work with what you have, I'd just try and get as good a sound possible from the 57, experimenting with placement.

You'll be severely limited though.


it should be fine if he uses a click track, unless he really sucks and can't keep in time with a click track.
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#8
^ I don't know, I've always thought of overdubbing different parts of the drum as being difficult and inaccurate. If you can get good results from it, then good on you.
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#9
yeah it's kind of tricky, but if you use a click track, plus all of the wonderful trimming and looping modern technology has to offer you can make it sound awesome, although if the drummer is really you won't need digital editing.
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#10
If you only have to option of two mics, i suggest that you place one condenser microphone directly in the middle of the kit, above the snare, and then place a mic on either on the bass, or add a mic outside of the room, for a real echo-y type sound (whichever you would prefer).

In my eyes, it would be better to have a decent overall sound using two different mics, than say two condensers. The sound will lack at least one thing (Bass in most cases).

You can do some really interesting things when editing later. I will let you ponder about it, instead of just coming out and telling you. You will definitely learn more by working it out for yourself. Plus its really REALLY fun working out ways to make tracks sound much better.
#11
You could try using one mic as an overhead placed in the centre of the kit (perhaps pointing slightly towards the snare and hi-hat) and place the other mic on a stand a few feet away from the bass drum.

It could sound good, it could sound terrible. Either way you won't get great results.
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#13
go to a recording studio,! talk to people who teach music, they can often get you in studios cheap, for instance, my guitar teachers has HIS OWN studio. And the band im in is goin in the summer holidays or 'break' whatever you americans call it.
hope that helped
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#14
dont try to overdub individual drums afterwards. That will never work and you'll spend hours afterwards trying to get all the drum sounds to line up.

A) buy an interface and some more mics

or

B) Use a stereo pair, in X-Y configuration
#15
Quote by Animeguy
dont try to overdub individual drums afterwards. That will never work and you'll spend hours afterwards trying to get all the drum sounds to line up.



I've done that several times with minimal issues, although it does take a really good drummer, and usually a bit of digital tweaking.
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