#1
I bought Fingerboard for Guitar by Mel Bay and it was very informative at first, but now its not as detailed as i would like. I have been looking at the Guitar Grimoire books and I am thinking about getting them, but I'm not sure if they are what i want or if they are any good.

Right now I am considering purchasing Scales and Modes, Chords and Voicings, Progressions and Improvisation, Chord Encyclopedia, and The Exercise Book. What do you think of these books? Are there other books you would recommend, if not these?
#2
My oldest guitar playing friend, who is also a music teacher (at many levels...teaches instrumental instruction at two grade schools, and has about a dozen private students in both guitar and trumpet, while also playing in a classic rock band and attending Peabody Conservatory) swears by the Grimoires, and got me in to them as well...I'd recommend any of those if those are areas you want to improve, tbh.

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#3
i dont kno, but i flipped through the one about scales once, and it looked godly.

i correct myself, satanic.
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#5
Quote by edg
I have a couple of the Grimoire books. Waste of money.
They look thick, but they're just repetitive.

+1

You know your books, so that makes me feel better for feeling the same. I have the progressions and improvisations and it's an OK read but is only worth 5% of the money. I flipped through the scales one and it's only a giant list of scales. They could show you just the intervals to one scale but they show you the notes in every single key. It's super repetetive to try and fill up for what it lacks in (more explanation and how-to).
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#6
It presents the EXACT same stuff in EVERY key. If you know how your keys
work on the guitar, which is very basic stuff, you realize you can divide the size
of the book by about 12. So you're getting 1/12 of any "information"
given the thickness and even that 1/12 isn't all that great.

All the Grimoire books work the same way. They look thick and "scholarly", but
they're about as deep as a mud puddle.

Anyone interested in learning more about scales, pick up "Sheets of Sound Vols
I & II". You'll get way more out of those than any Grimoire.
#9
I'm looking to learn modes, chord progressions, how chord embellishments relate to each triad within a scale, and how to improvise. Does sheets of sound cover all of these?
#10
Quote by edg
It presents the EXACT same stuff in EVERY key. If you know how your keys
work on the guitar, which is very basic stuff, you realize you can divide the size
of the book by about 12. So you're getting 1/12 of any "information"
given the thickness and even that 1/12 isn't all that great.

All the Grimoire books work the same way. They look thick and "scholarly", but
they're about as deep as a mud puddle.

Anyone interested in learning more about scales, pick up "Sheets of Sound Vols
I & II". You'll get way more out of those than any Grimoire.


A lot of instructional material is like that though.

Plus, in this day and age, you rarely have to pay full price for those things. Look hard and shrewdly enough, and you can find the Grimoires for a song.

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VOLUME SWELLING OCTAVE MONGER σƒ τλε τρπ βπστλεπλσσδ

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#11
I have the scale book and the chord book, and yes they are that sort of repetitive but they are nice for a quick reference and I think it has the best layout of any book like that I've seen. It's also good for showing other guitarists and/or bassists who may not be as well versed in theory what you are doing, they keyboard diagrams are a nice addition too.

That being said IMO these are strictly for reference and when actually learning this stuff you should learn the intervals and whatnot and figure things out for yourself.
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#12
I have the scales and modes book. I would recommend it for quick reference. Like if you want to find the 5th mode of a Dominant Sus really quick. I would definately recommend it for beginners. I already knew the basics of scales and modes when I got the book, but it sure as hell helps you brush up on your jamming skills.

Personally, I swear by the Grimoire.
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#13
Quote by BaffAttack
A lot of instructional material is like that though.


Not like this series.

Sure, it's ok as a reference book, but if you understand even a little bit of basic
fretboard and scale knowledge. it's a reference book you don't need to reference.

I have the "Exercises" and "Progressions" books. Exercises is a real waste (much
better material out there), Progressions is moderately useful. I've browsed through
the others in stores. They're all about the same format.

Opinions were asked for and I gave mine. If you're going to be spending your money
and time on learning/instructional material, you can do a lot better than these
Grimoire books. But that's not to say you'll get nothing out of them either.
#14
Quote by edg
Not like this series.

Sure, it's ok as a reference book, but if you understand even a little bit of basic
fretboard and scale knowledge. it's a reference book you don't need to reference.
.


I have quite a bit of fretboard and scale knowledge and I still use it as a reference, sometimes it's just more straightforward to look up a scale chart than it is to figure it out on the fretboard.

same with a lot of complex chords.
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#15
I know the Grimiore's seem really repetitive but when you really get
into them they can be quite deep..You can take a scale and transpose
it into any key or any style just by looking it up. I have found tons of
possibilities in my Book of Scales..

I think the video DVD is garbage though..I have it and i dont want it..
I'll send it to you...
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#16
i have only briefly browsed them, but i know that John Frusciante, the guitarist of the red hot chili peppers absolutely swears by them, if that means anything at all.
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#17
Why do the books have such a good name for themselves if their so repetitive
#18
^Because apparently the people that use them are lazy and can't figure out that something can be used in a different key without the book showing it for them.


They're horrible books. I want to burn mine but it was a present. The first time i was disappointed in a present. I put a smile on my face and was thankful for the gesture though (it was very kind).
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


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