#1
So my band has got a few originals that we think are pretty decent and have gotten their fair share of positive feedback, mostly from people our age. We're all very determined and are looking forward to start gigging sometime at the end of summer. We recently got a singer who famous in my country and well... it seems things are finally looking up for the band.

A friend said he could hook us up with a friend of his who happens to be a manager. I started thinking that do we really NEED a manager? I've always kinda been the "heart of the band" in every band I've been in. I'm the one who makes sure everyone arrives at the rehearsals on time, organizes a practice area, makes sure we got the equipment we need and stuff like that. Getting gigs isn't gonna be a problem because of our famous singer (He got to the TOP 5 in my country's version of American Idol, a show the whole nation watches. I knew him from a band we used to be together, way back). I'm pretty sure venues would want to book us, because we'll definitely attract a crowd because of the singer, no matter what kind of music we'd play.

So do we really need a guy doing a job I could easily do and taking a percentage of our earnings? Or is there something I'm missing - what exactly is the role of the manager?

Thanks!
#2
they manage booking and generally take care of most of your business, and promotion, I would say you don't need to worry about one untill you start touring at the very least. otherwise you're just paying someone who isn't doing much you can't handle
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#3
Originally Posted by Chromeproguitar
they make horrible noises in the middle of the night (is it sex?)

Quote by CliffIsAngry
I guess she's pretty hot if you're into that "having a good music video, but not better than Beyonce's" kind of thing...
#4
Quote by Kid_Thorazine
they manage booking and generally take care of most of your business, and promotion, I would say you don't need to worry about one untill you start touring at the very least. otherwise you're just paying someone who isn't doing much you can't handle

agreed.
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Originally Posted by Gizzard101
I personally prefer Dr.Dre but Lil Jon is gangsta home boy fresh aswell.
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Quote by lzrdsixsix6
sounds like you have a severe case of the dumbass.....it's quite common in the pit really just sleep it off
#5
Sounds like you don't need a manager, but if you feel you might, make sure you make an agreement with him that he won't start earning off you until you start earning a substantial amount from gigging (e.g. not just getting paid for fuel and travel and a crate of beers).
#7
another good time to get a manager is if A&R people start talking to you, even if you aren't touring, that's also when you get a lawyer.
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#8
My band had one for a while, but they were just doing it to hang out with us and they weren't getting paid or anything. Just for fun.

But, then the singer at that moment quit, and so did the manager because they were like best friends. So now we don't have one and it seems to be working out.
#10
My band has a manager, he doesn't want us to pay him, he does it because his son is our drummer He has really helped us as far as getting gigs and getting our material out there. He has experience too so it works out well for us
#11
Quote by Lendorav
bump! Still waiting for SlackerBabbath's response


Who? Me? Oh, OK.

Well it's already been said really, a manager is someone who handles the band's business interests. He may book your gigs or get an agent to book your gigs, (which will incur extra costs because the agent will want a cut) handle merchandise, arrange hotel bookings and transport, (which will also incur costs) arrange TV and radio appearences and press interviews, negotiate recording contracts, ect, ect.
They generaly do this for somewhere between 10 and 25 percent, but can occasionaly make a deal where they are an equal partner in the band with everyone else. Led Zeppelin's manager Peter Grant had this type of deal.
But if you sign any contracts, make sure it states that he gets a percentage from your 'net' profits, not 'gross' profits.
If he gets a percentage of your 'gross' profits, that means he takes his share before you've paid for any costs which would be a much bigger figure than if he were to take a 'net' percentage. If you incur a lot of costs, it can even lead to you not having enough money left to pay for those costs, that's how much difference one word in a contract can make. I know this because it happened to me and I've been wary of managers ever since.
Still, he was just a bad example, good managers do exist and if you get the right one it could be the best move you ever make, but be careful, there's a lot of sharks out there.
Of course, if you feel you can handle all this business stuff on your own, you don't really need a manager, but it's worth thinking about as he takes a lot of hassle and worry away from the band and lets them just concentrate on the music, which is what most musicians crave, to be able to just make money from making music whithout any hassles.
Many bands (my own included) find that although they don't need a manager, a booking agent who just concentrates on getting you really good gigs is a very useful asset.

I normaly wouldn't advise most bands to get a manager, especialy young bands, but because of your well known singer, in your case I'll make an exeption because the business possibilities that arise from him being in the band, with the right guy working for you, can make you all a lot of money.
Hell, if I lived in your country, I'd offer to manage you myself.
But I really must stress, be really, really careful, make sure you choose the right guy, because if you don't, it can be a nightmare to get out of the contract you'll have with him.
Remember the 'gross' and 'net' thing, it's important. If he takes a 'net' percentage, then the more money he makes for himself, the more money he makes for all of you as well.

Will that do for you?
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Jun 30, 2008,
#12
^

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#14
But I really must stress, be really, really careful, make sure you choose the right guy, because if you don't, it can be a nightmare to get out of the contract you'll have with him.


It's almost certainly a good idea, if you're signing a contract with a manager that will have him involved in the band for a significant period of time, to get it looked over by a lawyer who's an expert in contract law and specifically in the music industry. It might take a bit of looking, and it will cost you, but it will not cost as much as a ****up in the contract will do.

In fact, all significant contracts should be looked at by a lawyer, really. Because if issues arise as to what people are entitled to, then lawyers are probably going to become involved anyway. You might as well try and be on a sound footing from the word Go.
#15
Quote by Samzawadi
It's almost certainly a good idea, if you're signing a contract with a manager that will have him involved in the band for a significant period of time, to get it looked over by a lawyer who's an expert in contract law and specifically in the music industry. It might take a bit of looking, and it will cost you, but it will not cost as much as a ****up in the contract will do.

In fact, all significant contracts should be looked at by a lawyer, really. Because if issues arise as to what people are entitled to, then lawyers are probably going to become involved anyway. You might as well try and be on a sound footing from the word Go.

Agreed 100%.