#1
I thought there was no E# B#?

I am looking at a chord book and it lists the key of
"F#" having a E#o Chord and the key of C# having a E#m Chord
and a B#o Chord???

I cannot find chord diagrams for any of these chords...

What gives???????
#2
There are those notes. It's a misconception to say there isn't.

F# has six sharps(F C G D A E) and C# has 7 sharps. (F C G D A E B)


E# and B# are enharmonic notes for F and C respectively and you shouldn't be alarmed if you see them often in sheet music.
Last edited by confusius at Jun 27, 2008,
#4
Each letter is represented once in a diatonic scale (can be flat, natural, or sharp) & none are repeated, and to keep this convention in tact, you'll get E# & B# when dealing with the scales you've shown.

So in a F# major scale, the leading tone is called E# so every note appears once, rather than having F as the leading tone which would make the scale have two different F's in it.
You would play an E#m chord the same exact way you would a Fm chord, the name just varies depending on the context in which it is used.
#5
Quote by newguitars08
so if I am learning all the chords in these two keys should
I call the E# and B#'s F and C?


nope

they are the "same notes", but shouldn't be labeled that way as it would not be consistant with the system.

In a diatonic scale you will have 7 individual notes each represented by a different letter.

If you follow the formula of the Major scale from F# you get...

F# G# A# B C#D# E#


Quote by Stash Jam
Each letter is represented once in a diatonic scale (can be flat, natural, or sharp) & none are repeated, and to keep this convention in tact, you'll get E# & B# when dealing with the scales you've shown.

So in a F# major scale, the leading tone is called E# so every note appears once, rather than having F as the leading tone which would make the scale have two different F's in it.
You would play an E#m chord the same exact way you would a Fm chord, the name just varies depending on the context in which it is used.


^ well said. I didnt realize you beat me to it.
shred is gaudy music
#8
Quote by confusius
There are those notes. It's a misconception to say there isn't.

F# has six sharps(F C G D A E) and C# has 7 sharps. (F C G R A E B)

Didn't know there was an R#...
Just kidding, I know it's a typo.
Great info here
You may say I'm a dreamer, but I'm not
#9
Quote by party_on_wayne
Didn't know there was an R#...
Just kidding, I know it's a typo.
Great info here


I actually read that post, noticed that there was an R, and for some reason I thought nothing of it. I mist be really tired.
#11
Spanish = Solfege?
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#12
Pretty much, but it's not done in the way that you assign Do to any relative pitch. Whilst it can be the correct thing that Do = C. So from there, Do (C) Re (D) Mi(E) Fa(F) Sol(G) La(A) Si(B) Do(C)