#1
I have the fretboard logic Volume I and II DVD. On the book it shows the "nuclear form" of triads, the 1 3 and 5 degrees on just 3 strings. Then in another column it shows the barred versions/full forms which consist of more then just 3 strings of the 1 3 and 5 degrees. Are triads more then 3 strings?

Somebody please help me to see the relationship of the "nuclear form" of triads and the barred version/full forms of triads.
#2
A tried is a chord with three notes. Nothing more. You can play those notes wherever you want.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#3
It doesn't matter how many times you repeat the note, if it's only 3 different notes, it's a triad. You can play them whatever way you want really as long as the notes are in it.


Damn you Archeo, you beat me to it Oh well, I still love you.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#4
If I have a 3rd on two strings would I have to lower both of them to produce the minor chord?
#5
I don't get what you're asking, sorry. Could you word it a little different?


Edit: Ohhh... you mean lowering in pitch, as in flattening, yes. A minor triad is: 1, b3, 5 instead of a major triads: 1, 3, 5. When you flat a note you lower it a half-step/semitone.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
Last edited by metal4all at Jun 26, 2008,
#6
Quote by pathway88
If I have a 3rd on two strings would I have to lower both of them to produce the minor chord?


Yes.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#7
Why can't the augmented and dimished full forms be barred with all 6 strings.

I am confused that all the minor triads can be barred with all 6 strings and the diminished and augmented are barred/extended without all 6.

How do I know which strings to play/not to play with the augmented and dimished triads? It says something about barred and extended forms. What does extended mean?
#8
As long as you have the notes, you can play it however you want, including barring.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#9
Quote by pathway88
Why can't the augmented and dimished full forms be barred with all 6 strings.
In an E or Em barre shape, the shape most commonly used for 6-string barres, the fifth is played as part of the barre. This should make sense, since the open E chord contains the B string as the fifth.

For augmented, the open E+ chord either involves a muted A string or 4 fingers, and 4 fingers can be above a barre.
#10
you can also do Inversions with any triads

pretty much this

1-3-5 thats just a normal triad you can Inversion it to say like 3-5-1 or 5-1-3

when it comes to baring chords that pretty much happens in a way
in stead of 1-3-5 its something like 1-5 then 3rd

anyway it dosnt matter where you go on the neck as long as those notes are in their
so you dont have to follow it exactly Root,3rd and 5th

as far as making a major a minor just flat the 3rd
and to make a minor a major just sharpen the 3rd

their are Natural minors and majors

Example ACE...thats a natural minor now if you Sharpen the 3rd
AC#E...its now a major

and if its a natural Major just Flat the 3rd

>.< hope that helps in some way i know learning theory can be Confusing..specially if your reading it from a book
#11
Thanks that helped but I am still having trouble. Let me explain my questions a little more detailed.

E--------
B--------
G---1--- 5
D---2--- b3
A---4--- 1
E--------

The book describes the chord above as the C minor form nucleus. The form is
based from the CAGED sequence. The degrees are to the right of the
chord. I understand how to build this triad. I get confused with the
column to the right of the nucleus forms column called "Full Forms".


E--------
B---2--- 1
G---1--- 5
D---2--- b3
A---4--- 1
E--------

This chord above is next to the nucleus C minor form under a column
called "Full forms". The degrees are again to the right of the chord.
This chord is described as the C minor form Barred.


I understand how to build the "nucleus" forms but I do not know how to build the "full forms" from the "nucleus" forms. Can somebody help me see the relationship between the two?
Last edited by pathway88 at Jun 28, 2008,
#12
The only real difference there is that there's the octave as the last note. Btw, that's C#min. You have the notes C#, E, G#, C# which is C# min.

To be honest, I wouldn't too much about it. It has it's own weird wording to it e.g. If you asked someone the "nucleus" form of a chord they would probaby have no clue what you were talking about. It's a term I've never heard before which I'm pretty sure is just made up by that book/dvd for teaching purposes.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥