#1
hey

well im looking to get to both the tuning listed in the title

i have a Korg guitar/bass tuner GA-30 tuner
how do i do it on this lol and i cant tune by pitch
sorry if i dont make sense lol

i wana start to play some System of a Down and some 3 days grace
#2
use online-bass tuner (google it) u have to use pitch hearing tho xD and u shood atleast try cause relying on tuner isnt gonna last forever. drop d-ing is easy drop c will come with technique or simply going to that site
#4
It depends on which instrument you're using.

Drop C:

For Guitar: The top five (highest pitched) strings are dropped one step (IE; e becomes D, B becomes A, etc). The bottom string is tuned to C (it should harmonize with your 4th string).

For bass: This is where it becomes trickier. With bass strings, the bottom string doesn't like being dropped, and depending on which instrument and gauge you use, you may just have to uniformly drop everything one step and transpose bass notes. Also, when you drop that low on either instrument, sometimes it requires a truss rod adjustment. Unless you're very comfortable, take it to a guitar tech. It can work without one, but you may experience some fret buzz.

For drop D:

Just keep your guitar/bass in standard and lower your bottom string one step, to D instead of E. That's it!


Hope that helps.
-Guitar Gear-
1995 American Fender Strat, EMG 85 pup
Randall RH200 Head
Marshall 1960a Cab
Woods Acoustic
-Bass Gear-
Spector Legend 4 bass
Washburn Bantam bass
Hartke HA2500
Fender Bassman 410H
Play what you love, love what you play
#5
I'm fairly new as well, but I learned to tune Drop D by ear just by tuning the 7th fret of E to sound like open A. Try that.
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"Psychedelics are almost irrelevant in a town where you can wander in a casino any time in the day or night and witness the crucifixion of a gorilla."- Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas
#6
^Actually, that's both right and wrong.

When tuning the A and D strings, you hold the 5th fret of A to make it sound like a D. By moving up a step on the E string, you're basicly simulating that but with the lower string. It's far easier and more accurate to harmonize the low E string with your D string. Both would work, but I've found the 7th fret technique is less percicse then just harmonizing with the D.
-Guitar Gear-
1995 American Fender Strat, EMG 85 pup
Randall RH200 Head
Marshall 1960a Cab
Woods Acoustic
-Bass Gear-
Spector Legend 4 bass
Washburn Bantam bass
Hartke HA2500
Fender Bassman 410H
Play what you love, love what you play
#7
Quote by Garou1911
It depends on which instrument you're using.

Drop C:

For Guitar: The top five (highest pitched) strings are dropped one step (IE; e becomes D, B becomes A, etc). The bottom string is tuned to C (it should harmonize with your 4th string).

For bass: This is where it becomes trickier. With bass strings, the bottom string doesn't like being dropped, and depending on which instrument and gauge you use, you may just have to uniformly drop everything one step and transpose bass notes. Also, when you drop that low on either instrument, sometimes it requires a truss rod adjustment. Unless you're very comfortable, take it to a guitar tech. It can work without one, but you may experience some fret buzz.

For drop D:

Just keep your guitar/bass in standard and lower your bottom string one step, to D instead of E. That's it!


Hope that helps.
sooo the thickest string is tuned to C ? how do i do that lol im a tuning noob
#8
^ (Garou1911)
I tried tuning to D first and I found my method a little better for me. Maybe I'm half-deaf to D, but it's cool that you gave our poster other options...
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"Psychedelics are almost irrelevant in a town where you can wander in a casino any time in the day or night and witness the crucifixion of a gorilla."- Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas
#9
tell me if im doing it wrong


what i do is i hit the flat button 2 times and tune it as if it was standard
#10
Quote by Grunge_Sucks
^ (Garou1911)
I tried tuning to D first and I found my method a little better for me. Maybe I'm half-deaf to D, but it's cool that you gave our poster other options...

Fair enough. Like I say, they both work, I just find the other method more percicse. But whatever gets you there

To TS: Maybe you should read some of the tuning lessons on the main site. Start with drop D to get the concept. If you're not quite getting it, it may be too early for you to try drop C.
-Guitar Gear-
1995 American Fender Strat, EMG 85 pup
Randall RH200 Head
Marshall 1960a Cab
Woods Acoustic
-Bass Gear-
Spector Legend 4 bass
Washburn Bantam bass
Hartke HA2500
Fender Bassman 410H
Play what you love, love what you play
#11
Drop D....all you do is drop the lowest note...(that would be Low E---> D)
D a d g b e

Drop C.... Do the exact same thing except tune the strings to drop D on the second fret
all the way across...

Tune every string to drop D...just tune every string on the 2nd fret instead of open...
what it does is drop every string one whole tone...
It will go to ...... C-g-c-f-a-d

this is a good thing to learn...Drop C and Drop d have the same exact intervals..
so as long as you are only dropping the lowest string you can tune in half steps or
whole steps by tuning to frets..

1st fret is one half step...Tune Drop D on the first fret you get Drop D sharp
2nd fret is one whole step...Tune to drop D on the 2nd fret you get Drop C
the system behaves just like cromatic scales... D, D#, C

An alternative is to put a capo on the 2nd fret ...tune to Drop D..then take it off..
you are essentially doing the same exact thing...

This is a simple way to tune to drop-D
if you dont have a digital tuner...A digital tuner is a great tool to have..They have Digital
tuner/metronomes at local Target stores now. If you would rather save that money towards
some other gear ..you can use this method to get by.

Try some other tunings as well..I always had something missing from my metal tones and
after years of spending money on pedals and such..I realised that My ear finds Drop D#
to be the tuning to get my ideas across. I dont play in Open-G too much..but it always
inspires me to write songs..lately I have found strengths in my playing style on acoustic
that i didnt know I had. So try to play acoustics as well. You will find that even though
you can do really outrageous things with distortion...an acoustic guitar can be very soulful
and metal can be played on it as well..and tug at your heart as well as make you break
your neck..lol

So use intervals...if you need a string dropped to another note....
count how many half steps it is away from standard...
the number of half steps is the fret u use...
tune that fret to standard and you will have the appropriate new tuned string
This is the method of using intervals

On the Korg Tuner you have a Flat button...(b)...everytime u put a flat on the screen
you are dropping the tuning one half step..so if u put two flats on the screen..and
tune to drop D....hahahaha...same as using the 2nd fret..
I bet Charlie Brown's teacher's name was Mrs.Hammett
Last edited by Washburnd Fretz at Jun 26, 2008,
#13
Quote by Free Time
This website makes me want to drink


Lol, Reality makes me want to drink, but yours is as good excuse as any...
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"Psychedelics are almost irrelevant in a town where you can wander in a casino any time in the day or night and witness the crucifixion of a gorilla."- Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas
#14
Quote by Youknowit
tell me if im doing it wrong


what i do is i hit the flat button 2 times and tune it as if it was standard



Thats dropped D Tunning.

pressing the flat button makes the tunning go down 1/2 a step.
#15
Quote by JessicaGonzo
Thats dropped D Tunning.

pressing the flat button makes the tunning go down 1/2 a step.



actually thats d tuning


drop d is 2 flats on only the E string, Drop c is the same on all strings but the E string is 4 flats (i have a korg tuner also )
#16
read the only tuning thread stickied at the top of this forum.
Been away, am back