#1
I'm looking for things in my routine to get better at ear training, writing chord progressions, modulating, chromatic tones and any other theory practice. I am not looking for technique lessons, I am looking for things to help me learn theory. Write now I'll pick a scale and run it all over the fretboard, a new one every day, and I will also practice ear training by trying to follow songs and also by trying to match tones on piano and guitar. I know some of you have gone to music school, what are some of the things they had you do as practice? I'm open for anything, if it's transcribing music in different keys or sight-reading random stuff I don't care. Any practice ideas you can give me I'd be more than thankful to know about.
#2
break scales into arpeggios and run them in different patterns, then try tripletting each note in the scale as you play through it, and if your trying to train your ear...try different tunings by ear
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#3
I'm still trying to get the 'best' practice session (I even posted it on message boards looking for help ), as you can see by my similar topic below, but I have a few things I do to work on my music knowledge. For theory, I use my Berklee Harmony books. They are not mine, but I had them given to me and they are the way they teach it, but any in depth book should do. Ear training really helps if you have a friend. Learning songs by ear is good in all, but I don't really consider it ear training. For me, a friend and I work intervals, chords, and scales facing the opposite direction. Example: He plays two notes and I have to tell him the interval between each. That is how most students at music schools will practice it. Sight reading is one of my troubles and probably will always be. I started a bit late into music and haven't been reading for that long (about five six years). I play different melodies out of the real book, read transcribed solos, and play my classical.

So that is theory, sight reading, and ear training, if you need anything else let me know
#4
My theory prof recommended going here for ear training practice. http://macgamut.com/

EDIT: The software isn't free but it's really helpful, I bought it myself and I can say that it's worth it.
Last edited by pwrmax at Jun 27, 2008,
#5
Quote by motokid9
I'm still trying to get the 'best' practice session (I even posted it on message boards looking for help ), as you can see by my similar topic below, but I have a few things I do to work on my music knowledge. For theory, I use my Berklee Harmony books. They are not mine, but I had them given to me and they are the way they teach it, but any in depth book should do. Ear training really helps if you have a friend. Learning songs by ear is good in all, but I don't really consider it ear training. For me, a friend and I work intervals, chords, and scales facing the opposite direction. Example: He plays two notes and I have to tell him the interval between each. That is how most students at music schools will practice it. Sight reading is one of my troubles and probably will always be. I started a bit late into music and haven't been reading for that long (about five six years). I play different melodies out of the real book, read transcribed solos, and play my classical.

So that is theory, sight reading, and ear training, if you need anything else let me know


that helped a lot, I've been wondering where I can get some Berklee books.

I use this sites ear trainer for something similar:

http://www.musictheory.net/

one problem I have is that I can't hear the sound in my head without going Do Re, or Do Mi. I have to sound it out like that, any advice to just recognizing the interval without subvocalizing like that? Although, can someone check that out, and tell me what the heck the tritone is on the interval ear trainer. I don't get it.
Last edited by farcry at Jun 27, 2008,
#6
Quote by farcry
any advice to just recognizing the interval without subvocalizing like that?


If you need to subvocalize it to recognize it don't say "do re" unless you know for sure you're listening to a major 2nd. It takes practice to be able to instantly recognize an interval.

Quote by farcry
tell me what the heck the tritone is on the interval ear trainer.


Tritone is a diminished 5th, which is a perfect 5th minus 1 semitone. It's called a tritone because it's a 6 semitone (3 tones) interval. An example would be C to Gb, it has that 'evil' feel to it.
Last edited by pwrmax at Jun 27, 2008,
#8
Quote by pwrmax
If you need to subvocalize it to recognize it don't say "do re" unless you know for sure you're listening to a major 2nd. It takes practice to be able to instantly recognize an interval.


Tritone is a diminished 5th, which is a perfect 5th minus 1 semitone. It's called a tritone because it's a 6 semitone (3 tones) interval. An example would be C to Gb, it has that 'evil' feel to it.


Thanks, I was always wondering that. I thought it might be a thing like C-G-D as in three intervals stacked on eachother. Anyone else got any other ones from formal classes, since I've past the age where I have access to music courses I need help from you guys. The best thing would be a list of things they practice in berklee music school. So far UG has been the best interactive online source I've found.