#1
My Les Paul has this problem i realised a few days ago. It explained why solos sometimes sound **** on it! lol.

The higher notes get sharper around the tenth fret, and gradually get more and more out of tune as you get to around 20. BUT, some of them arent out that far out, its weird.

The twelfth (<-- sp?) fret is usually in tune, but on the D string it is not. If necessary i will draw out a little diagram of which frets are in tune or not if thats whats needed to diagnose this problem.

Can any of you help me? And possibly tell me how much this will cost?
#2
It's because it's a les paul. Zing.


Or intonation. Get it set up at a guitar shop or find a guide online to DIY.
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Schecter C-1 Classic
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Mesa 50/50 Power Amp
Avatar G212H 2x12 Cab

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M-Audio Oxygen 61
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Reason 4.0
FL Studio 8
#6
Ahhh jolly good. Thanks for replies everyone, have just looked up how to set intonation and its worked pretty well.

Thanks!
#8
That article is brilliant!! That hint about switching to the neck pickup, rolling the tone knobs down and picking over the 12th fret is especially helpful.

Favourited that article lol.
#9
im sure the article is good, here's an intonation guide...

SETTING INTONATION: from icepoint...
Most electric guitars provide individual string length adjustment for setting intonation. Fine tuning this length insures that your guitar plays in tune all the way up and down the neck.

Using an electronic tuner, tune your guitar to pitch.
One string at a time, play the harmonic at the 12th fret and then play the fretted 12th fret note.
If the fretted note is sharper than the harmonic, increase the string length slightly until both notes register the same on your tuner.
If the fretted note is flat compared to the harmonic shorten the string length slightly until both notes register the same on your tuner.
Repeat the procedure on all strings until the harmonic and the fretted notes are the same.

if you cant get a harmonic, compare the 12th fretted note to the open string note.

and retune the open string after every saddle adjustment.


Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


Set up Questions? ...Q & A Thread

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#10
Its just the way guitars can be. I have 2 epi LPs one plays fine stays in tune no out of tune frets. The other is very tempermental, it constantly needs small adjustments and has some frets that just sound off one day I can play its fine next day its gotta bet screwed with again. The other never needs adjusted just played. Epis can be hit or miss. If everything is adjusted right, tuned and intonated, may not be much can do about it.
#11
Quote by jj1565
im sure the article is good, here's an intonation guide...

SETTING INTONATION: from icepoint...
Most electric guitars provide individual string length adjustment for setting intonation. Fine tuning this length insures that your guitar plays in tune all the way up and down the neck.

Using an electronic tuner, tune your guitar to pitch.
One string at a time, play the harmonic at the 12th fret and then play the fretted 12th fret note.
If the fretted note is sharper than the harmonic, increase the string length slightly until both notes register the same on your tuner.
If the fretted note is flat compared to the harmonic shorten the string length slightly until both notes register the same on your tuner.
Repeat the procedure on all strings until the harmonic and the fretted notes are the same.

if you cant get a harmonic, compare the 12th fretted note to the open string note.

and retune the open string after every saddle adjustment.



Yeah, that's a good place to start. Personally, I like to tune up normally & then check the intonation at the 5th, 12th, and 15th frets. I set the intonation so that there's somewhat of a balance across those three positions (I get them as close as possible to correct pitch).

Of course, there are other factors to consider as well, like string height, nut height, neck bow, etc. Here's a more detailed explanation taken from that article I posted:

"The process involves moving the bridge saddles back and forth, effectively changing the length of each string until the frets are in the best positions under the string (easier than moving the frets around!), and also adjusting the curvature of the neck with the truss rod (too curved, and you will have to push the strings too far to get to the frets in the middle of the neck, and they'll be sharp) and adjusting the height of the bridge overall (too high, and fretted strings go sharp, but with the whole neck, not just the middle; too low, and they buzz and rattle). To do it right, you have to know how hard the guitar is going to be played, and keep in mind that sharp-on-the-initial-attack thing I mentioned in Part 1.

Sometimes, you will sadly conclude that the damned frets are simply not in the right places, and you just gotta live with it. You do the best you can... Probably no one will ever hear it but you.

...Guitars have other problems. I've found that with some guitars, the nut is too tall. This means that as you get closer to the nut, you have to press harder to bend the string down toward the fret... just the opposite of what you'd expect. This means that any note played on the first fret will be very sharp. Check this on a few guitars with a precise tuner and you will be very, very scared... "
Last edited by sinofian at Jun 27, 2008,
#12
Quote by Tackleberry
Its just the way guitars can be. I have 2 epi LPs one plays fine stays in tune no out of tune frets. The other is very tempermental, it constantly needs small adjustments and has some frets that just sound off one day I can play its fine next day its gotta bet screwed with again. The other never needs adjusted just played. Epis can be hit or miss. If everything is adjusted right, tuned and intonated, may not be much can do about it.



yeah, maybe he's mashing the notes a little at times too.

depnds on the epi model.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


Set up Questions? ...Q & A Thread

Recognised by the Official EG/GG&A/GB&C WTLT Lists 2011