Poll: Who do you side with
Poll Options
View poll results: Who do you side with
Strict (my) definition of "bailed"
20 87%
Loose definition of "bailed," and sentiment that the above strict definition is not in common usage
3 13%
Voters: 23.
#1
Fellow UGers:

I was recently having a discussion with a friend of mine when he said "Ted can't play in the musical, he bailed." (Paraphrased) I argued that this generally implied that the Ted in question was unable to play due to personal conviction, not necessarily because of scheduling conflicts or other restrictive circumstances. He argues that it has a host of meanings, and then later stipulated that that meaning "is not even a common contextual association. At all." (Literal quote)

I state that bailed primarily carries a negative connotation, in that it suggests that one's reason for bailing is not necessarily a valid or worthy one. My friend states that bailed indicates the act of being unable to do something for any reason whatsoever, and that my stipulation isn't remotely a common sentiment.

Please vote for my interpretation (Option 1) or his interpretation (Option 2). He said that two people he was with agree with him, and I want the internets to be on my side.

Thank you in advance for helping me win a petty fight xD

**EDIT: I might also add that skaters, pot smokers, musicians, and event coordinators all use my definition on a high regular basis.
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Last edited by Mo Jiggity at Jun 27, 2008,
#2
I'd have to agree with your definition there.

The majority of the times I use the word "bailed", (or "ditched", for that matter) have been used in a negative sense.

Of course, I have heard it thrown around quite loosely, even if said person had a legitimate reason for failing to show up. Though, as explained above, most of the times I (and many other people I know) use the word when someone:

1)Had no excuse
or
2)Had a rather poor one.
Last edited by Doppelgänger at Jun 27, 2008,
#3
I agree that it has negative connotations, but I think your argument depends more on the common usage in your area/circle. The more common usage around here is, yes, with negative connotations i.e bailing at the last minute, but without a strict, defined reason.
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#4
i've always used the term like you; like "I was gonna ask her out, but i bailed" (stupid example but what-ev ) where bailed implies lack of confidence/courage/aggression.

I'd side with you, but language evolves.
#5
Bailed indeed does have a negative connotation and implies that the person(s) withdrew from an action for an unjustifiable cause. It's more closely related to "giving up" rather than an unforeseen circumstance which resulted in his absence.
#6
Wow, I expected a healthy amount of opposition, but apparently nots.
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#7
It means to quit. So you win.
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#8
Quote by Mo Jiggity
Fellow UGers:

I was recently having a discussion with a friend of mine when he said "Ted can't play in the musical, he bailed." (Paraphrased) I argued that this generally implied that the Ted in question was unable to play due to personal conviction, not necessarily because of scheduling conflicts or other restrictive circumstances. He argues that it has a host of meanings, and then later stipulated that that meaning "is not even a common contextual association. At all." (Literal quote)

I state that bailed primarily carries a negative connotation, in that it suggests that one's reason for bailing is not necessarily a valid or worthy one. My friend states that bailed indicates the act of being unable to do something for any reason whatsoever, and that my stipulation isn't remotely a common sentiment.

Please vote for my interpretation (Option 1) or his interpretation (Option 2). He said that two people he was with agree with him, and I want the internets to be on my side.

Thank you in advance for helping me win a petty fight xD

**EDIT: I might also add that skaters, pot smokers, musicians, and event coordinators all use my definition on a high regular basis.

On the rare occasions I've used it, I've meant it that way. If someone has a valid reason for not showing, I wouldn't use 'bailed'.
#9
I had a hell of a time reading your post. Blast my lack of reading comprehension skills!

I voted with you. Bailed is used in a negative sense.