#1
how would i go about using the harmonic minor scale if my chord progression is made up of chords from the major scale? can i use the same chord for the natural minor but add a #7 to it?
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#2
use the relative minor scale
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#3
theres a harmonic major scale, 3rd mode of the harmonic minor scale.

it goes

1, 2, 3, 4, #5, 6, 7

form a chord progression with these scales can be difficult. You have to keep in mind that you aren't referring back to the major scale.

Ill give you an example when it comes to making chords in these scales. You want to make a Phrygian dominant chord you add the sharped 3rd. It makes a major chord while, we all know phrygian is a minor scale.

My advice would to use all regular chords and just use a variation of a power chord for the harmonic minor note.
Last edited by woodsballplayer at Jun 27, 2008,
#5
@selkies - i wanted the harmonic minor, the natural minor and harmonic minor are 2 different things. if i used relative minor i would end up using natural minor not harmonic minor.

@woodsballplayer - that doesn't help me if my chords are a I, III or V as the #5 would screw up the chord progression. especially on the III and V. although that harmonic major scale is something i will hold onto, i wanna try using it.

EDIT - ionian augmented 5 got it, 1 2 3 4 5 b6 7 is harmonic major, i'm gonna remember both.
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#6
Quote by aradine
@selkies - i wanted the harmonic minor, the natural minor and harmonic minor are 2 different things. if i used relative minor i would end up using natural minor not harmonic minor.

@woodsballplayer - that doesn't help me if my chords are a I, III or V as the #5 would screw up the chord progression. especially on the III and V. although that harmonic major scale is something i will hold onto, i wanna try using it.


I love the harmonic minor, its just difficult to use at first. Its extremely hard to make full open chords with it, because honestly, most of them sound like crap.

Like i said I'd just use power chord variations, use the bass note, experiment with adding the 9th.
#7
alright, so no one has really answered my question.

my chord progression is (key of G)

Gmaj, Cmaj, D7, Emin

what chord could i add into that to allow the use of harmonic minor?
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#8
You could use E harmonic minor over the Em.
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#9
really? i thought you could only use natural minor over a relative minor chord. thank you.
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#10
but you see, D is not in G harmonic major, D# is and thats the note that will give you that harmonic sound.

youd need to play a chord with D# as the root containing a bG and an A

i believe.
#11
Quote by woodsballplayer
but you see, D is not in G harmonic major, D# is and thats the note that will give you that harmonic sound.

youd need to play a chord with D# as the root containing a bG and an A

i believe.
This post is completely wrong. G Harmonic Minor is G A Bb C D Eb F#. There is no D# and there is a D natural.

Aradine, you wouldn't use the harmonic minor scale, or any other minor scale, over a major progression. The common use of the harmonic minor scale is with the major V chord in a minor key (ex. B7 in Em).
#12
Quote by bangoodcharlote
This post is completely wrong. G Harmonic Minor is G A Bb C D Eb F#. There is no D# and there is a D natural.

Aradine, you wouldn't use the harmonic minor scale, or any other minor scale, over a major progression. The common use of the harmonic minor scale is with the major V chord in a minor key (ex. B7 in Em).


he wrote hes in g harmonic major a few posts up.
#13
Quote by woodsballplayer
he wrote hes in g harmonic major a few posts up.
Well, no, he's not in G harmonic major; he's in G natural major.

On the note of the major V chord, isn't that D7? Yes it is. Try G Harmonic Minor over the D7 chord. That's the chord you would typically use it over anyway.
#14
Quote by woodsballplayer
but you see, D is not in G harmonic major, D# is and thats the note that will give you that harmonic sound.

youd need to play a chord with D# as the root containing a bG and an A

i believe.

No, not at all, sorry. He wanted to know about harmonic minor.

Aradine: You can use the harmonic minor scale over straight minor chords, it's just that it's not the most common application. I personally do it quite a bit and like the sound.
#15
this is so confusing hahaha

i fell victim to my own trap

You have to keep in mind that you aren't referring back to the major scale.


i could figure it out if i had my guitar. :[

thank you for correcting me though
#16
Quote by bangoodcharlote


On the note of the major V chord, isn't that D7? Yes it is. Try G Harmonic Minor over the D7 chord. That's the chord you would typically use it over anyway.


How would he transition to the E?
#17
Quote by beadhangingOne
How would he transition to the E?
Use the Eb of the G Harmonic Minor scale as the leading tone of Em. Remember, Eb sounds eactly the same as D#!
#18
You'll probably end up using the relative harmonic minor. If you put a B7 immediately before the Em, creating very strong V i motion seen many minor key pieces, at least for those chords you can use E harmonic minor just fine. In a standard major diatonic type thing, however, you'll generally want to stay in key. Feel free to hit the blue note or maybe use the occasional chromatic run, but it's "prettier" and more traditional to stay in key.
Last edited by grampastumpy at Jun 28, 2008,
#20
Quote by aradine
how would i go about using the harmonic minor scale if my chord progression is made up of chords from the major scale?
Simple answer, you dont. It's not possible, harmonic minor is only played over minor progressions.

Complex answer...

The defining elements of the harmonic minor is the leading tone, which resolve melodies to the root, and the m6, which creates an augmented second interval which sounds really easter.
If you want to achieve an eastern sound similar to the harmonic minor, read the following.
Over dominant chords try to use m6's and m2's (to the root of the chord playing) as accidentals. This will sort of sound like the phrygian dominant mode, which is very eastern sounding. It's best if you play a perfect fifth after the m6's to resolve the tension it creats, and its best to play a m3 after the m2's to create that augmented second interval i was talking about.
Over minor chords, which sound naturally eastern anyway, try to find places to play m6's with M7's, which would create your typical melodic augmented second interval.

In future, keep in mind that the scale being used does NOT mean a certain sound. It all has to do with phrasing, melodic/harmonic dissonance, the context and the chord progression.