#1
So i recently bought a book called "The Guitar Grimoire-Scales and Modes", thinking it could be the perfect answer to my theory questions. When it came, however, I opened it and was bombarded.

With scales.

Not that it's a bad thing, but seeing as how I have no clue as to how scales work, I am currently seeing it as little more than a paperweight made of half and whole steps.

But my real question is this- How the heck do I start learning scales? By learning I do NOT mean playing them, which I can do more than well. But actually knowing the intricacies of them (what makes them up, etc.). So I could play them anywhere on the fretboard. I actually took some time and memorized all of the notes on the fretboard (which I think is a good starting point for a theory nubcake like myself). So would I just learn the half and whole steps to the scale or mode being played? What is the difference between a scale and mode anyways? Thanks for your time.
#2
so you want theory start with key signatures they lead into scales and how there used and constructed then goto modes

the easiest way to explain is to base it all off c the key of c has no sharps or flats so the scale is c d e f g a b c now the next key goes in order of sharps or flats the first sharp is in the key of g and it is f# so the scale is g a b c d e f# g
and so on and so forth the key signature changes the notes in the scale
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#3
A good way to learn more about scales is to know their key signatures. There should be some exercises online that help you remember which key signature goes to which scale.

EDIT:
When I learned I used "Father Charles Goes Down And Ends Battle" to memorize the order of sharps and "Battle Ends And Down Goes Charles' Father" for flats. That basically means what order you write the accidentals in the key signature.

As for which key signature goes to which scale:
C Major - No accidentals

G Major - 1 sharp
D Major - 2 sharps
A Major - 3 sharps
E Major - 4 sharps
B Major - 5 sharps
F# Major - 6 sharps
C# Major - 7 sharps

F Major - 1 flat
Bb Major - 2 flats
Eb Major - 3 flats
Ab Major - 4 flats
Db Major - 5 flats
Gb Major - 6 flats
Cb Major - 7 flats

Refer to the order of accidentals to know what notes become sharp/flat. Eg, D major has 2 sharps so the key signature would have F and C sharp (Father Charles).
Last edited by pwrmax at Jun 27, 2008,
#5
learn the circle of 5ths if you wanna take selkies advice and learn key sigs first.

FCGDAEB, is the order of sharps (Fat Cat Got Drunk At East Ballarat)

order of flats is in reverse

then read the theory sticky in this thread, also read the crusade columns. they helped me understand theory. and if your like me and learn better through watching rather than reading, youtube my friend.
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#6
This will help... look at this pic i just scanned...
Attachments:
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#8
This is going to be an ultra n00b question, but here it goes...

What exactly is a key signature? I know modes go with certain keys, like a D Lydian mode would go with A Major. So would the key of A be the key signature of the D Lydian mode?
#9
Quote by NowhereOutThere
This is going to be an ultra n00b question, but here it goes...

What exactly is a key signature? I know modes go with certain keys, like a D Lydian mode would go with A Major. So would the key of A be the key signature of the D Lydian mode?

First: don't worry about modes right now. A key signature is a notation letting you know which notes are sharpened/flattened, as well as where the tonal center is.
#10
Quote by :-D
First: don't worry about modes right now. A key signature is a notation letting you know which notes are sharpened/flattened, as well as where the tonal center is.


I'm going to take a wild guess and say this is where the circle of fifths comes in, right? So the key of C has no sharps, etc.
#11
Quote by NowhereOutThere
I'm going to take a wild guess and say this is where the circle of fifths comes in, right? So the key of C has no sharps, etc.

Yes, exactly.
#12
The Guitar Grimoire isn't particularly useful....it doesn't actually teach you much of anything, it's more of a reference guide.

Read "The Crusade" articles by Josh Urban in the Columns section...they'll be much more use to you.
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