#1
Hello, I'm a new member and I am looking into starting on shred guitar. I know the major and minor scales and I was wondering where I should start. Since I don't have a teacher, I have no real guide to this. I really want to be an instramental guitarist like Joe Satriani or Steve vai and to accomplish my goal, I will have to know how to shred.

Anyways, where should I start when learning good alternate picking and lagato? What should I do in terms of exercises and what to practice? Should I just run up and down scales? Is there any specific way I should hold the guitar?

I hope to get a lot of resposes on exercises, tips on technique, and maybe even some music theory.

I prefer to be informed in PM's if possible.
#2
start off by learning techniques such as legato etc. there is a lesson in the lessons section that gives an explanation of shredding techniques.

learn your modes, and not just shapes either, learn the notes cold.

learn how chord progressions can influence the sound of the song and scale you are using.

don't just stick with the modes of the major scale, learn the harmonic minor and its modes. also look into ecotic scales, satch uses alot of exotic scales in his songs.

LEARN JAZZ! i can't stress this one enough, if you know Jazz, not only will you be able to play shred easily (as shred is just Jazz Rock sped up), you will also get the benefit of learning alot of theory. Satch learned from Jazz teachers, Paul Gilbert learned from some Jazz teachers. Satch taught Vai, Gilbert taught Buckethead. it all makes sense.

along with Jazz also learn classical, learning classical i believe is learning the equivelent to shred of the medieval times (and above).

god luck.
Quote by coolstoryangus
Pffffffft schematics


Although i guess the OP will have to get used to reading them if he's going to buy a bugera..
Quote by gregs1020


along with fire escape routes...

#3
Quote by The.new.guy
Hello, I'm a new member and I am looking into starting on shred guitar. I know the major and minor scales and I was wondering where I should start. Since I don't have a teacher, I have no real guide to this. I really want to be an instramental guitarist like Joe Satriani or Steve vai and to accomplish my goal, I will have to know how to shred.

You must, must, MUST have excellent alternate picking technique before moving to anything else. Learn your scales by knowing all of the notes of the fretboard. Also, keep in mind you don't have to know how to shred to be an instrumental guitarist though it's useful.
Quote by The.new.guy
Anyways, where should I start when learning good alternate picking and lagato? What should I do in terms of exercises and what to practice? Should I just run up and down scales? Is there any specific way I should hold the guitar?

Focus on alternate picking first. Chromatic exercises that incorporate finger independence are excellent, as are the "spider" patterns. And don't just run up and down scales unless that's all you plan to do in your solos.

Quote by The.new.guy
I prefer to be informed in PM's if possible.

This is a forum, you're going to be informed in this format. It's more beneficial to everyone.
#4
Ok, I've heard a lot about anchoring. I've also heard that it is unneeded pressure put on the guitar to help with acuraccy. I also know that it is bad...Would resting, with no extra pressure, my forearm on the body of the guitar be considered anchoring?

Also, are there any specific sites that have lessons focused on Jazz playing?

EDIT: Thanks a TON so far!
Last edited by The.new.guy at Jun 27, 2008,
#6
Quote by :-D
You must, must, MUST have excellent alternate picking technique
This man speaks the truth.


As for theory, try the link in my sig. The "soloing" link is helpful as well, but perhaps not so much yet.
#7
Quote by The.new.guy
Also, are there any specific sites that have lessons focused on Jazz playing?

There are tons. Doing a bit of advertising here, www.jazzguitarlessons.com is a good place to look; Rick Stone (the website owner) is my jazz teacher and very well-known and respected in the jazz community. There's an amazing amount of information you can learn from this man.

That being said, how well do you know theory? I'd recommend at least a decent understanding before getting into jazz.
#8
I do know some theory. Only very little though. I know how to make a major scale and some modes and I know how to make the basic triad.
#9
Quote by The.new.guy
I do know some theory. Only very little though. I know how to make a major scale and some modes and I know how to make the basic triad.
As I said, the "theory" link in my sig will fill in the gaps.
#10
To Sue (Bangoodcharlote),
Thank you for the quick link to the theory lesson. Much appreciated!
#13
well as far as the whole shred thing goes, yeah running the scales you do know with alternate picking is great, and as important as picking is, dont pass on legato (thats helps so much with endurance and sounds awesome) but, many will argue this, dont try tackling to much at one time with the technique field, if you want to get good chops then you must focus intensely on certain aspects. for example take those scales you know, and get them up to a speed which you dont feel comfortable at and see how fast you can cleanly get them (this wont take one practice session) then once you've hit a wall with that, try changing the pattern, groupings of notes, or even how your play it (legato, picking starting on upstroke or down stroke). repeating this will get you hands used to play at full speed, and then starting expanding you practice exercises.
*if you are just starting out on shred, then you must develop a habit of stretching and warming up prior to heavy practice sessions. spider exercises are great for warmup
NOW im not saying just practice one exercise and do nothing else, im just stressing the point that you must repeatedly practice an exercise in order to get it to motor memory and to that point of it being very uncomfortable, because once at that point, thats when it is most important to try and get it faster and cleaner, thats the point where new ground is broken.
no theory/soloing/advice sig or book for that matter will ever compare to the vaule of having a good teacher, that said my favorite shred book is Shred is Not Dead by Terry Syrek. but i guess thats because i have studied under the great shred lord that is terry.
but there is no way around achieving this goal and there is no secret answer that people praise on these forums will bestow upon you where it will have you playing like gilbert or lane or petrucci. you must practice, practice, practice, and then keep doing it. shredding neatly is not easy (and please dont flail you hands around hoping that each hand will sync up with the other and make it sound fast. too many people do that
as far as satch and vai. there stuff is very complex and very simple. knowing all the theory in the world is not gonna get you writing tunes like satch's "crying" or "whispering a prayer" get a teacher for theory, they can explain it better that url link on the internet.
and maybe Jazz has helped other people shred, but i have found it to be detrimental to my progress in shred, sure the theory gained in jazz is crucial, but in terms of technique i wont endorsee its importance to helping you get the shred speed and most importantly feel. when you use vibrato, bending, and god forbid a double stop (all common in shred) in jazz you will make no friends, and the way numerous jazz teacher have had me change my picking style and frethand style was not beneficial to shredding at all. dont get me wrong i studied jazz for about six years, and the time i devoted to it was great and i gained so so so much out of it. but for people to tell you to learn jazz then learn shred, it just blows my mind.
hope that can give you some ideas for practicing. and good luck man
anyway practice stop reading and go practice man
Quote by :-D
I go to college with mattrsg1; for what it's worth he is the best guitarist I have heard in person, and in particular stands out from others in my age group. You will not be disappointed, honestly.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AJpCZpysf94
#15
Quote by aradine
LEARN JAZZ! i can't stress this one enough, if you know Jazz, not only will you be able to play shred easily (as shred is just Jazz Rock sped up), you will also get the benefit of learning alot of theory. Satch learned from Jazz teachers, Paul Gilbert learned from some Jazz teachers. Satch taught Vai, Gilbert taught Buckethead. it all makes sense.

along with Jazz also learn classical, learning classical i believe is learning the equivelent to shred of the medieval times (and above).

god luck.


Not necessarily true. A lot of shred guitarists are not jazz based. Shred is a really broad term, but it doesn't have to apply to any particular genre. There is a reason that it is pretty easy to tell Steve Vai from Shawn Lane from Ritchie Blackmore from Randy Rhoads.

Theory also doesn't tell you how to play, it can give you ideas and an understanding of knowing what you are doing and how to build off, but you can know everything there is to know about theory and still be a boring, unimaginative and inexpressive guitarist. There is also no reason you can't learn other styles in a theory intensive way.

Just because something influenced a narrow group of very prominent group of shred guitarists, it doesn't me that it is inherent to the genre. There are lots of shred guitarists without jazz basis.

Classical isn't the equivalent of shred either. Classical focuses on different aspects of playing, which can help musically broaden someone with more musical ideas. However, it is basically a different instrument with different techniques. A lot of techniques aren't even that transferable between playing on a classical and an electric guitar.
#17
Quote by mattrsg1
well as far as the whole shred thing goes, yeah running the scales you do know with alternate picking is great, and as important as picking is, dont pass on legato (thats helps so much with endurance and sounds awesome) but, many will argue this, dont try tackling to much at one time with the technique field, if you want to get good chops then you must focus intensely on certain aspects. for example take those scales you know, and get them up to a speed which you dont feel comfortable at and see how fast you can cleanly get them (this wont take one practice session) then once you've hit a wall with that, try changing the pattern, groupings of notes, or even how your play it (legato, picking starting on upstroke or down stroke). repeating this will get you hands used to play at full speed, and then starting expanding you practice exercises.
*if you are just starting out on shred, then you must develop a habit of stretching and warming up prior to heavy practice sessions. spider exercises are great for warmup
NOW im not saying just practice one exercise and do nothing else, im just stressing the point that you must repeatedly practice an exercise in order to get it to motor memory and to that point of it being very uncomfortable, because once at that point, thats when it is most important to try and get it faster and cleaner, thats the point where new ground is broken.
no theory/soloing/advice sig or book for that matter will ever compare to the vaule of having a good teacher, that said my favorite shred book is Shred is Not Dead by Terry Syrek. but i guess thats because i have studied under the great shred lord that is terry.
but there is no way around achieving this goal and there is no secret answer that people praise on these forums will bestow upon you where it will have you playing like gilbert or lane or petrucci. you must practice, practice, practice, and then keep doing it. shredding neatly is not easy (and please dont flail you hands around hoping that each hand will sync up with the other and make it sound fast. too many people do that
as far as satch and vai. there stuff is very complex and very simple. knowing all the theory in the world is not gonna get you writing tunes like satch's "crying" or "whispering a prayer" get a teacher for theory, they can explain it better that url link on the internet.
and maybe Jazz has helped other people shred, but i have found it to be detrimental to my progress in shred, sure the theory gained in jazz is crucial, but in terms of technique i wont endorsee its importance to helping you get the shred speed and most importantly feel. when you use vibrato, bending, and god forbid a double stop (all common in shred) in jazz you will make no friends, and the way numerous jazz teacher have had me change my picking style and frethand style was not beneficial to shredding at all. dont get me wrong i studied jazz for about six years, and the time i devoted to it was great and i gained so so so much out of it. but for people to tell you to learn jazz then learn shred, it just blows my mind.
hope that can give you some ideas for practicing. and good luck man
anyway practice stop reading and go practice man


interesting