#1
Ok so I was wondering if this had a name: where you're playing in let's say F major, where the three major chords are F, Bb, and C. When I play a G major chord in a song in F major, does that have a specfic name? Is it a key change or what?
#2
G is in the key of F, so you're aren't modulating, per se. You're merely raising the 4th. I suppose you could say you are modulating into C or any other key where G, B, and D are natural, but it's not much of a modulation, just a non harmonic tone.
#3
A G major chord is not in the key of F. It is G minor. However, you can play whatever you want and justify it as a pleasant (or even dissonant) chromatic note/chord.
#4
It can be dissonance .. depending on the context and/or your opinion, it can sound good or bad. An example can be Brain Damage - Pink Floyd, the chorus has the chords G Major A Major C Major but still sounds good.
Last edited by pwrmax at Jun 27, 2008,
#5
It's likely that you are using it as a secondary dominant. G is the V of C, and C is the V of F so G is called the the "V of V", which is a common secondary dominant.

It's out of key, but not exactly a key change. It's called tonicization because you are temporarily treating C as the tonic.
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#6
it depends how you play it, it's not a borrowed chord from the parallel key, you could play it as a passing chord to F if you play it fast. And it's not modulation of keys unless you establish a new tonal centre away from F. It won't sound that bad because the B natural in the G chord is only one key away, listen to Led Zeppelin's Babe I'm Gonna Leave you and look up the tab, they do something similar.

edit: damnit all the smarty pants people beat me here and made me feel not so smart
Last edited by farcry at Jun 27, 2008,
#8
Quote by farcry
listen to Led Zeppelin's Babe I'm Gonna Leave you and look up the tab, they do something similar.
Do you mean the bit at the beginning?
#9
at both the arpeggiated bits and the chorus. It's the Emajor that's out of key. I hope I'm not wrong about something here and I end up looking like a retard.
Last edited by farcry at Jun 27, 2008,
#10
Quote by farcry
at both the arpeggiated bits and the chorus. It's the Emajor that's out of key. I hope I'm not wrong about something here and I end up looking like a retard.
E major is a very common chord in the ley of Am, even more common than an Em chord. However, I think you know that.

I meant the "25 or 6 to 4" or "Brain Stew" kind of riff at the beginning, with Paige playing (bass notes) A G F# F E.
#11
It is, in itself, not a modulation. However, that G chord will often resolve to C through V I motion and the key will change to C major. To play the G chord within the key of F can be a couple things things. It can be thought of as modal interchange: borrowing the G chord(or the B, more specifically) from the parallel lydian mode(F lydian). That's what I'd generally consider it personally(assuming no key change). Alternatively, it could be a way for the bassline to move chromatically from Bb to B(inversion of the G chord). Etc. etc.
#12
It might not be a modulation, but it should be treated like one.

Try to aim for the chord tones of the new chord over that new chord. And try to avoid the note thats different in the 2 new keys (Bb I believe) in the previous 1 or 2 bars. I wish I could say more, but everyone beat me to it

Quote by bangoodcharlotte
E major is a very common chord in the ley of Am, even more common than an Em chord. However, I think you know that.
If you use an Em chord in Am, it would usually mean the progression would have more of a pull towards the C major chord instead of the A minor chord. The same with using a G7 chord instead of a G#b5bb7 chord. But you can get aeolian harmonies that only use the natural major chords, but would still resolve to that A minor chord.
#13
there's no way to say what it is until you give me the context. It could be V of IV, it could be a brief modulation into C or G, it could be borrowing a chord into Fm, it could be modulating into Fm, it could be doing several different things. There's no way to explain it until you tell me the context.
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#14
in response to demon: how could a third(E-C) resolve better than a fifth(E-A), that makes no sense to me.
#15
Quote by demonofthenight
If you use an Em chord in Am, it would usually mean the progression would have more of a pull towards the C major chord instead of the A minor chord. The same with using a G7 chord instead of a G#b5bb7 chord. But you can get aeolian harmonies that only use the natural major chords, but would still resolve to that A minor chord.
While this is true, a v chord is not THAT rare. In most classical music, it is, but in more modern pop-ish stuff not so much. For instance, in Rick Astley's Never Gonna Give You Up(lulz), the chord progression is Gb Ab Fm7 Bb. Not only does the Fm7 sound ok and still provide v i resolution, but the whole identity of the song would be lost if it were an F7.
#16
in what way would using an Em chord pull it more towards C instead of Am?I've never heard of that. v is more common in i than iii is in I.
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#17
F 5th -> C 5th -> G

ive done that in songs for a long time and i dont remember how it is named BUT you can do that

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#18
Quote by UtBDan
in what way would using an Em chord pull it more towards C instead of Am?I've never heard of that. v is more common in i than iii is in I.
Really? While I wouldn't say iii's pull towards I's better than v's pull towards i's, I don't think v's are more common than iii's...