#1
When I'm working out the major scale in every key, how exactly do I go about it, in terms of knowing which particular note position to use. ie. I could use the note D on the 5th fret of the A string, or use the open D string.

I am using http://www.zentao.com/guitar/theory/ to start on the basics of theory. Anyone have a better free recommendation?
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Fender MIM Standard Strat
Fender Deluxe Reverb
Digitech Bad Monkey
Electro Harmonix Big Muff
Ernie Ball VP Junior 250k
Dunlop Cry Baby Wah
#2
Learn the notes on the fretboard, learn the pattern of intervals of the major scale, put the two together.

Notes appear multiple times on the guitar, so the exact same scale will have several possible "shapes" when you try to map it out, they're all equally valid.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#3
Yeah, I know the WWHWWWH thing. Based on that I would assume that you play the scale all on one string, but obviously that isn't the case. So basically, there are many shapes for the exact same thing?
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Fender MIM Standard Strat
Fender Deluxe Reverb
Digitech Bad Monkey
Electro Harmonix Big Muff
Ernie Ball VP Junior 250k
Dunlop Cry Baby Wah
#4
Quote by zapparage
Yeah, I know the WWHWWWH thing. Based on that I would assume that you play the scale all on one string, but obviously that isn't the case. So basically, there are many shapes for the exact same thing?




You could play the scale all on one string if you wanted, but there would be lots of different shapes for the same thing. It doesn't really matter what shapes you're using to play a scale as long as you're getting the notes right. You should try and get acquainted using all the shapes and positions you can find. There are websites that can tell you lots of them, but I think it's more beneficial to work it out for yourself because you will become more familiar with the fretboard.
#5
you can have it on as many strings as you like as long as its the right notes and the right order.

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost
#6
Quote by metallicafan616
you can have it on as many strings as you like as long as its the right notes and the right order.


The order is irrelevant. You don't even have to stick to the notes in the scale if you don't want to.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#7
Quote by zapparage
Yeah, I know the WWHWWWH thing. Based on that I would assume that you play the scale all on one string, but obviously that isn't the case. So basically, there are many shapes for the exact same thing?

Why would you think that?

The pattern doesn't refer to the physical spaces between points, it refers to the differences in pitch between notes. It just so happens that one fret on the guitar correlates to a semitone so you can use the same formula for counting pitches to count frets.

Forget shapes for the time being, concentrate on familiarising yourself with the notes, the intervals and the sounds they make to give yourself a basic understanding of what it is you're trying to learn.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#8
Quote by zapparage
When I'm working out the major scale in every key, how exactly do I go about it, in terms of knowing which particular note position to use. ie. I could use the note D on the 5th fret of the A string, or use the open D string.

I am using http://www.zentao.com/guitar/theory/ to start on the basics of theory. Anyone have a better free recommendation?


Build the scale. Let's say, D major: D E F# G A B C#. Those notes are all over the fretboard. Find them. The easier way would be to learn patterns, which can than be moved (in case of D#, one fret up, got it?).

How do you learn that? Let's first name the scale degrees:

D E  F#  G  A  B C#
1 2  3   4  5  6 7


Now, instead of memorizing patterns of those 7 notes all around the fretboard, we'll just memorize 3 notes: 1-3-5 degrees of the scale. How's that done? CAGED.


That's a good site to get started. Once you've learned the CAGED system for the key of D, it's easy to play a major scale. How? You know your intervals, don't you? If you were to play a 2 (E note, in this case), you'd play a whole step away from the 1, which you know where is in the CAGED system. 7 is easy, it's just one fret down from the 1, 4 is one fret up from the 3 (half step).

Not only that you've learned your scale this way, but you also get to focus on the strongest sounding notes: 1-3-5. Those are called chord tones (they build chords... ).

This way works for other scales too: modes, minor scales... The minor scale, which has the following formula: 1-2-b3-4-5-b6-b7; is also easy to handle. The b3 is just a fret down from the 3, same for the 7th (a fret down from the 7, that's two frets from the 5, which is three frets from the 5).

Don't memorize the intervals for other scale like you did for the major scale; WWHWWWH. Just learn the formula. "It tells you what you have to do in order to turn the ordinary major scale into that scale."

Anyway, this approach works great when following chord progressions, even if they're out of key. Just change your CAGED, and resolve anything you play to the 1-3-5 (1-b3-5 in case of a minor chord).

I hope you understand this, if not, I hope someone else will find it helpful.

Cheers!
"The end result - the music - is all that counts"
#9
Go to www.wholenote.com and use the scalefinder under "basics." It will give you box fingerings of any scale all over the fretboard.

However, progressing further into theory will not happen until you understand the theory behind the major scale, so please make sure you understand that.
#10
memorize the patterns and shapes............. then look at the all theory behind that pattern. That should do the trick, and that process will goes much smoother and faster than trying to find the major scale based of the interval formula on your own when you seem to be having trouble doing just that
Quote by :-D
I go to college with mattrsg1; for what it's worth he is the best guitarist I have heard in person, and in particular stands out from others in my age group. You will not be disappointed, honestly.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AJpCZpysf94