#1
i've been thinking about getting a keyboard to help with my understanding of music theory. the keyboard, in my opinion really makes you learn the theory behind everything you play (ex: you cant just get away with learning a movable scale position).

do you think it will help advance my understanding of theory, and in turn help advance my level of guitar playing? also have any of the multi-instrumentalists in the forum realized that the process of learning one instrument has helped you with learning guitar?
#2
There's absolutely no point whatsoever - you can reproduce exactly the same notes on a guitar. There's not really any such thing as a moveable scale postition...you're problem is that's what you learned them as, positions. You didn't learn the scales themselves first, so you need to go back and re-learn everything.

Learn where the notes are on the fretboard and make the effort to use them when learning scales. You're going to have to do that regardless of whether you have a keyboard or not.
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#3
It is harder to not learn theory playing keyboard, but it is doable. You can memorize scales and chords on it, like you can on guitar. Theory is the same from instrument to instrument, but learning on keyboard isn't going to teach you how to find all the intervals moving from string to string on a guitar. It isn't going to teach you how to best form chords (the easiest way to form chords on a keyboard is often slightly more awkward if you directly transfer to guitar).

You'll get the broad theory, but not the nuances of each instrument, that is something you need to learn separately for each.
#4
Quote by steven seagull
you can reproduce exactly the same notes on a guitar.


All frets on a guitar are equal, all keys on a keyboard are not. A good way to know a scale is to know how many accidentals are in it and playing it on keyboard makes it easier to remember because you'd be hitting a black key every time there's an accidental. When playing it on guitar, most people remember the pattern more than the actual notes. Piano makes it easier to know which notes you're hitting.

To answer the TS's question, keyboard can help because it's an accurate representation of the notes but it isn't essential to learn (I personally recommend taking some piano lessons, though).
#5
Quote by pwrmax
All frets on a guitar are equal, all keys on a keyboard are not. A good way to know a scale is to know how many accidentals are in it and playing it on keyboard makes it easier to remember because you'd be hitting a black key every time there's an accidental. When playing it on guitar, most people remember the pattern more than the actual notes. Piano makes it easier to know which notes you're hitting.

To answer the TS's question, keyboard can help because it's an accurate representation of the notes but it isn't essential to learn (I personally recommend taking some piano lessons, though).

Maybe I'm being stupid here, but I really haven't got a clue what your getting at.

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#6
Pure theory is instrument-independent.

I played piano about 10 years prior to picking up guitar. There's something to be
said for having a linear arrangement of notes, 1 note = 1 place, on the keyboard
for understanding theory. But, it's not entirely necessary. You can still work
things out on guitar in a similar way. The guitar's tuning might make it a bit more
confusing.
#7
Quote by steven seagull
Maybe I'm being stupid here, but I really haven't got a clue what your getting at.



I'm not sure how to explain this properly, a guitar goes from straight from open to fret 12 without any distinction as to which note is which because all the frets feel the same. A keyboard goes from one note to an octave above that but every time you reach an accidental you hit a different kind of key and that way you know what note you're hitting. Keyboard also help with understanding chord triads and how they work.

EDIT: There's a reason why I had to learn piano to study music in university.
Last edited by pwrmax at Jun 28, 2008,
#9
Quote by pwrmax
EDIT: There's a reason why I had to learn piano to study music in university.

Because piano is THE harmonic instrument. Yes, sometimes the guitar can be limiting, especially when side by side with a piano, but it's not the instrument's fault several fall into the seducing pit of patterns over fretboard knowledge.
#10
Quote by pwrmax
I'm not sure how to explain this properly, a guitar goes from straight from open to fret 12 without any distinction as to which note is which because all the frets feel the same. A keyboard goes from one note to an octave above that but every time you reach an accidental you hit a different kind of key and that way you know what note you're hitting. Keyboard also help with understanding chord triads and how they work.

EDIT: There's a reason why I had to learn piano to study music in university.


So the issue here is people learning patterns on the guitar which impedes their learning of the theory behind it all, yet you're advocating learning on piano because there's an even stronger form of visual identification of the notes?

Surely that's ultimately worse?
Actually called Mark!

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#11
Quote by steven seagull
So the issue here is people learning patterns on the guitar which impedes their learning of the theory behind it all, yet you're advocating learning on piano because there's an even stronger form of visual identification of the notes?

Surely that's ultimately worse?


The visual identification on a piano differs from that on a guitar. You can learn a scale the wrong way (by following a pattern) on guitar. On piano there is no pattern you can be tempted to follow, just notes which makes sense because a scale isn't a pattern. There's only 1 way to play a note on piano but several ways to play it on guitar (unless the guitar only has 1 string). Several ways to play a note make your life easier but if you start out on it then you're taking the easy way out and that might come back to haunt you.