#1
Hi everyone!

I've got 2 months time, and I'd like to train my ear. What's the best way? Solfege or something else? Please answer me quickly since I'm traveling tomorrow. (relative pitch)

Thanks!
"The end result - the music - is all that counts"
#2
Play intervals on your guitar, sing them, and memorize their sound. Once you start getting good, start quizzing yourself on what interval sounds like what. Sing a fifth, and then play a fifth on your guitar to see if you're right.
#3
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#4
I would say solfege, also it helps to know little tricks, like; a fourth sounds like the "here comes the bride" song a sixth sounds like the NBC theme (which goes 1, 6, 4). good luck
#7
Quote by LegionsOfDeath
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+1

Yep, basically play and repeat. Make little tricks for yourself so you can remember what sound is what interval. Such as, a I IV sounds like the wedding march "Here comes the bride".
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#9
Quote by bubbamc119
You nailed it in your opening post. Solfege will get your ear straightened out, in terms of note function (relative pitch). See my article I wrote here:
http://www.jsguitarforum.com/forum/showthread.php?t=56336


Wow, just started reading that article and it's great so far. Nice stuff .
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To somewhere safer
where the feeling stays.
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I'm getting blown away.
#10
Quote by jasonmetal love
+1

Yep, basically play and repeat. Make little tricks for yourself so you can remember what sound is what interval. Such as, a I IV sounds like the wedding march "Here comes the bride".


This method works very well, and helped me really reinforce some intervals. For the major scale, you can use these examples:

Major 3rd: Oh when the saints
Perfect 4th: Here comes the bride
Perfect 5th: Star Wars theme tune
Major 6th: Frank Sinatra's 'My Way'
Octave: Somewhere Over The Rainbow

I was taught ones for 2nds and 7ths as well but I can't remember what they were.
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#11
Quote by estranged_g_n_r
Wow, just started reading that article and it's great so far. Nice stuff .


Glad you like it, I'm going to re-write it soon to include how to use the method to read standard notation, and list all possible fingerings for the major scales. I will post it here when I'm done.

Regarding memorising intervals to train your ear, IMHO it will not help unless you're into intervallic or outside music. It certainly has its place, but for diatonic western music, solfege (or any other method of learning to hear note function) is the key.
Last edited by bubbamc119 at Jun 29, 2008,