#2
major= root,third,perfect fifth
diminished=root,minor third,lowered fifth

example: major C,E,G
diminished C,Eb,Gb
#3
A diminished chord is a major with the 3rd and 5th note lowered a semitone.

C Major - C E G
C Dim - C Eb Gb
#4
major C = C E G -> root + major third + perfect fifth

diminished C = C Eb Gb -> root + minor third + diminished fifth
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i got tired of my signature and i no longer has one

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#5
The difference between a major chord and a diminished chord is you would flatten the 3rd and 5th of the major chord to make a diminished chord. Exp. Cmaj C-E-G, Cdim C-Eb-Gb
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#6
so...

e
b7
g7---maj
d7
a5
e

e
b6
g5---dim, right?
d6
a5
e
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#8
^ +1 What Sue said, and why did you lower the octave by a step?
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#9
EDIT: THE FOLLOWING COMMENT IS OVERCOMPLICATED AND SHOULD BE IGNORED UNLESS YOUR TRULY INTERESTED
^major chords and diminished chords are the same, except diminished chords have a raised root.
Last edited by demonofthenight at Jun 29, 2008,
#10
Quote by demonofthenight
^major chords and diminished chords are the same, except diminished chords have a raised root.
Frankly, that's a confusing and very foolish way to think of it, though that relationship is good to know.

The formula is not #1 3 5; it's 1 b3 b5. If you have the #1 in there, then an Ab dim chord is A C Eb.
#11
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Frankly, that's a confusing and very foolish way to think of it, though that relationship is good to know.

The formula is not #1 3 5; it's 1 b3 b5. If you have the #1 in there, then an Ab dim chord is A C Eb.


DONT READ THE REST OF THIS POST AT RISK OF DRIVING THIS THREAD INTO MODAL IDIOCY

I was trying to answer why anyone would lower the octave. Anyway, why is it a foolish way of thinking of it? The superlocrian mode can be thought of as having a raised root, that is how it is technically formed. I just noticed that diminished chords are sort of the same.
#12

DONT READ THE REST OF THIS POST AT RISK OF DRIVING THIS THREAD INTO MODAL IDIOCY


Quote by demonofthenight
The superlocrian mode can be thought of as having a raised root, that is how it is technically formed. I just noticed that diminished chords are sort of the same.
They both work that way, but then the root isn't in the scale or chord. Like I said, if you play an Abdim triad with the formula #1 3 5, you end up with an Adim chord! It was brought up once before, and the relationship is good to know (that moving the root of a major chord up a semitone yields a diminished chord), but it is far too confusing.
#13

DONT READ THE REST OF THIS POST AT RISK OF DRIVING THIS THREAD INTO MODAL IDIOCY


Quote by bangoodcharlote
They both work that way, but then the root isn't in the scale or chord. Like I said, if you play an Abdim triad with the formula #1 3 5, you end up with an Adim chord! It was brought up once before, and the relationship is good to know (that moving the root of a major chord up a semitone yields a diminished chord), but it is far too confusing.
Not really strengthening my point, but I'm sure you'll find this interesting...

Figure this, the modes of the same major scale only change one note when going round in a circle of fifths. Dorian to mixolydian is a sharpened third. Aeolian to Phrygian is a flattened second. But how is lydian and locrian related? the root is sharpened.
If for some reason you see each chord of the major scale as relating to a specific mode (confusing, huh? ), than the half-diminished chord is a major seventh chord with a sharpened root.

I wrote my original post for metal4all (and not the random MT'ers), who would have been interested by my post. Should I edit in a disclaimer?
#14
Quote by demonofthenight
Should I edit in a disclaimer?
Yes.

And you described the pattern I mentioned, but using #1 is ridiculous anywhere outside of a sports setting (get the pun?).
#15
Quote by bangoodcharlote
And you described the pattern I mentioned, but using #1 is ridiculous anywhere outside of a sports setting (get the pun?).
lame.

I'm with Sue on this one. Using an altered root in a basic description of anything is a bit much. It's a real nice fun fact, but in any practical application of diminished triads(or m7b5s or dim7s) looking at the root as...the root is a lot more useful. Good job putting in the disclaimer though; hopefully TS steers clear of that for now.
#16
Quote by grampastumpy
lame.

I'm with Sue on this one. Using an altered root in a basic description of anything is a bit much. It's a real nice fun fact, but in any practical application of diminished triads(or m7b5s or dim7s) looking at the root as...the root is a lot more useful. Good job putting in the disclaimer though; hopefully TS steers clear of that for now.
Yeah... well... I had to have some contribution to the thread.