#1
The title says it all. Id like to get into the field of audio production and Im thinking about going to either Penn State, Virgina, or Penn. What major would you study there to become an audio engineer/producer? If you say audio production please state another one because not all schools have that as a choice.
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#2
Talk to your guidance counselor or the people at the different colleges you want to go to
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#3
Quote by bsoates
The title says it all. Id like to get into the field of audio production and Im thinking about going to either Penn State, Virgina, or Penn. What major would you study there to become an audio engineer/producer? If you say audio production please state another one because not all schools have that as a choice.


it was called "music tech" where I went to school.
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#4
Quote by bsoates
If you say audio production please state another one because not all schools have that as a choice.


well no ****.
not every school offers the same majors so you need to look around for schools that offer recording technology/audio engineering etc.
#5
ur best major would be audio engineering or sound engineering and if ur school doesn't offer that u can do electrical engineering
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Last edited by riffmasterjosh at Jun 28, 2008,
#6
www.virginia.edu
www.psu.edu
www.upenn.edu

Look up the chairman of each schools' music department and send them an email with your question.

Say something like:

"Dear [Chairman's Name],

I'm in the summer before my senior year of high school and I'm interested in applying to your institution. My career aspirations involve audio engineering/production. I am a tad perplexed as to what would be a good major to study in college. What you your thoughts on this?

Thank you very much.

Sincerely,
[Your Name]"

When you type the person's name, please address them as Professor Smith or Dr. Smith; please don't say "Dear John Smith." Also, you may want to drop an email to the chariman of each places' Department of Electrical Engineering. In fact, email a bunch of people, even if you have no interest in applying to their institution. If a bunch of people say you should do EE, then you should do EE wherever you go to school.

I email department chairmen all the time and while some of them are dicks and don't respond, they are generally glad to help someone interested in their field.

Edit: A lot of people are saying to do EE. I don't really know what an electrical engineer does, but I know it's a brutally hard degree and my guess is that they deal with circuits and computers more than acoustics.
#7
find a school with a audio engineering or music production major. i dont know if those schools have it, but some really really great schools with that are UMiami, USC, berklee, i think syracuse offers it, northeastern in boston. try checking those places out
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#8
Audio Engineering, Audio/Sound Production, all those kinda things.

Then again I know guys with Music Education degrees that are the heads of recording studios.

Cardinal rule in the music industry is "it's all about who you know, and when you know them."

Time, place, and connections all gotta come together in this industry. The way I look at it, college just gives you the basic knowledge, and a base to work on networking from through teachers and friends.
#9
I'm not trying to dissuade you here, but there are some things to consider before getting onto this career path:
1. It is a shrinking industry. Studios are closing ALL the time. Record label budgets are getting fewer and smaller, and home studios often offer a quality product at prices that pro studios can't begin to compete with. Add to that the fact that the average musician can make a half-way decent demo with Reaper, a small interface and a couple of cheap-ish mics, and it makes for a daunting business venture.
2. Given #1, all those people from the closing studios above are out there looking to get involved elsewhere. They're getting the jobs at the other remaining studios because a) they're experienced, and b) they've been in the business and have built relationships and developed connections. Others are blazing their own trail, and opening their own home-based project studios and competing independently in the market their prior pro studio couldn't compete with.
3. Whether you have a piece of paper or not, you will still start at the bottom, maybe (probably) even working for free vacuuming carpets, making coffee, and making runs to the corner store.
4. Studio owners know that a piece of paper *might* mean you're good at what you do and might even know a thing or two. They also know that it *might* mean some re-training to extinguish bad habits, update learning, etc. Sometimes it is easier for them to just take on a blank slate and train them from fresh.
5. Ultimately, as was said above.... it is all about connectedness. Paper or not, you have to get out there, shake hands, work for free, develop a reputation, get people to not only notice you, but to like you, etc. This is one of those industries where a piece of paper doesn't mean a whole lot. Just get out there. Prove how badly you want to do it. Show how committed you are and how easy you are to work with. Learn anything and everything you can, and show others what you can do with it. Develop trust. Eventually, you'll go from rinsing out coffee pots and scraping gum out of carpets to setting up the odd mic stand, to helping place mics, to helping run a late-night graveyard session when the second assistant's car breaks down and he can't make it out, to being the go-to guy for the jobs that nobody else wants, to being a guy that clients start to ask for, to.... you get the idea.

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