#1
Well, last night, I posted a thread on starting shred, (Thank you to those who helped ) and now I've started some alternate picking. I've been getting really serious about it, but I've realized that my picking just doesn't feel good. I've been using Jazz lll's and they seem to catch on the strings. I angle the pick, use the tip but it still happens. I've tried different picks with no success. This seems like a serious problem to me. I was playing last night and it felt so easy, it just came to me. The strange thing is, though, that it only happens on the higher frets. Normally 10th or higher feels so stiff. I use .09 gauge hybrid slinkys on my guitar, and they are pretty light. So should I just pick harder, or what?
#4
Perhaps you need to not dig in with the pick so much. Try "tickling" the strings rather than digging in.
#5
I used to have this "digging in problem"
my teacher gave me his special pick called the "stylus pick"
it's amazing what it did in just two weeks of usage
they're pretty cheap, deff worth checkin out mann

http://www.styluspick.com/
#6
Quote by Shuk
Perhaps you need to not dig in with the pick so much. Try "tickling" the strings rather than digging in.

That, and use thicker picks. (atleast that was one of my issues)

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#7
How thick are Jazz IIIs?

It might also help to hold the pick closer to the tip. It gives you a bit more control.
#9
1.38 mm is a Jazz III. I dont have any problems with them, although if your picking technique isnt up to snuff it can feel like it gets caught on the string, which is whats happening to you. Try angling the pick and using Paul Gilberts method of picking dynamics.
#10
i really wouldnt angle the pick... it was hard for me to get used NOT to do it.. im still having some issues..
what happens when you angle your pick is that the sound that is created when you're picking in the direction the pick is pointing to, it doesn't sound so much, and as a weird kind of sound... not to mention it is also harder to pick at higher speeds.. for me at least.. especially when doing sweep picking.. the string gets stuck between my fingers and pick.. and that's really not i look for lol
so yeah, imo, no angling.. that's really just an experience issue..
keep ur pick pointing towards the body of the guitar.. and do some chromatic exercises, to increase your left and right hand sync.
#11
What helped me the most was using smaller picks.
Speed picks or jazz picks helped a lot better than just choking up on a normal sized pick.
Last edited by MetropolisPt3 at Jun 28, 2008,
#12
Quote by MetropolisPt3
What helped me the most was using smaller picks.
Speed picks or jazz picks helped a lot better than just chocking up on a normal sized pick.


forgot to mention that.
it's a lot harder for me to use larger picks, but mostly only because of pinch harmonics..
i change very often the way i hold my pick.. for speed picking i hold it further away from the tip, when doing legato and what not, i hold it much closer..
and as i change often it would take a lot more time to get to the other position..
but thats just me! :P
#13
Quote by RCalisto
*abuse of ellipsis*


I disagree, although that may just be what's comfortable for you. If it is, then by all means, do it. Angling the pick will change the sound. I don't angle it very much, but just a little gives a great edge with a Jazz III.

TS, and really anyone, I highly recommend this video if your picking technique isn't what it should be.

http://ca.youtube.com/watch?v=s-NOMn3P9AE

I myself can't use a big pick. After changing to Jazz III's, I've never been able to or wanted to go back. I don't change how I hold it very much when I play. I can speed pick, sweep, and do pinch harmonics with ease without having to change my grip. With the pinches, I merely move my pick to an extreme angle and it works perfectly with how I hold the pick. Sometimes I shift very slightly back on the pick when I sweep, but I usually don't have to. It really depends on what is comfortable and most efficient for you.
#14
"Getting caught" is really a symptom of technique. It has absolutely nothing to
do with the pick you're using.

Probably what's going on is that, when the pick contacts the string, it exterts a
force back to the pick (and into the hand). You're just not dealing with this
contact in the right way. You're playing "against" rather than "with" the strings.
#15
Quote by jackshred
I used to have this "digging in problem"
my teacher gave me his special pick called the "stylus pick"
it's amazing what it did in just two weeks of usage
they're pretty cheap, deff worth checkin out mann

http://www.styluspick.com/


Actually this works pretty well too. I've used them (you can also make your own
which do the same thing). They can be frustrating to use, but really do help with
accuracy and picking motion if you stick with it long enough.
#17
try holding it a diferent way, i had problems when i started that i used to dig it way too much and it sounded awful and the pick would allways fly off my hand if i try to go fast...then i started "undigging" it and got another problem, i would "miss" notes in fast runs, the pick wouldnt touch the string lol...time + practice fixed everything and i can nicely alternate pick now =)

just watch youself closely and change the way youre doing it if it feels wrong, change picks, change string tension
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#18
I have a few points of advice as this same thing used to happen to me

1. First of all, just slow down your picking and give a nice smooth logical picking motion. At slow speeds you can many times examine and discover the problem.

2. In my experience the pick getting caught is almost always on an upstroke. So make sure your upstroke isn't a different motion than your downstroke. Obviously it's going to be "different" since you're moving a different direction, but what I mean is to have your upstroke essentially be a mirrored version of your downstroke, going back up the same exact way you came down. This creates even-ness and simplicity among your alternate picking. It may also prove useful to only use the tip of your pick, especially at higher speeds.

3. It may be a psychological problem. If it only happens past the 10th fret, you may just be putting yourself in a mental block. I know I used to. Examine your picking technique on the lower frets where you say your pick doesn't get caught, and apply it to the higher frets. It should be the same exact thing.

4. If either of those don't work, try out the Eric Johnson Jazz III and Ultex Jazz III picks. Both of them have a slightly more smoothed rounded tip (the Ultex even more so) than the standard Jazz III's, which make your pick "getting caught" a lot less likely. When I switched to these picks my pick never got caught anymore. I actually have switched back to the standard black Jazz III's because I realized that I liked the slightly sharper tip, but switching to the other picks for a short time helped me smooth out my picking technique and realize that a lot of it is definitely "in your technique" and that even your mind alone can hold you back.

Good luck.
Last edited by fixationdarknes at Jun 29, 2008,
#19
Quote by jackshred
I used to have this "digging in problem"
my teacher gave me his special pick called the "stylus pick"
it's amazing what it did in just two weeks of usage
they're pretty cheap, deff worth checkin out mann

http://www.styluspick.com/


DO IT DO IT NOW seriously everyone in this thread go buy some they work WONDERS for your picking technique!