#1
I know the Natural Minor is the same as the descending Melodic minor that can only be used descending, so does the same apply to the Natural Minor? im starting to incorporate it into my soloing so i need to know if im learning to use it correctly. Thanks.
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#2
i'm not sure i fully understand the question, but the natural minor is the natural minor and you can do whatever you want with it, melodic minor, i've hearned, in a jazz/rock context tends to be played the same way up and down...
#3
yeah im just asking if the natural minor can be played up and down thats all. cause i know its the same notes as the descending melodic minor, which can NOT be played up and down, only down.
Gibson Les Paul Studio
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Fulltone OCD
Fulltone Deja Vibe
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#5
Quote by HyperBoy2519
yeah im just asking if the natural minor can be played up and down thats all. cause i know its the same notes as the descending melodic minor, which can NOT be played up and down, only down.
In modern music, the melodic minor scale is usually played the same up and down.

Regardless, you can play the notes of the natural minor scale however you want.
#6
i think you play the natural minor descending because it containts the leading tone but you dont have to you can play the melodic minor up and down if you want.
#7
Quote by SoldierAnt
i think you play the natural minor descending because it containts the leading tone but you dont have to you can play the melodic minor up and down if you want.


i dunno if you just messed up your words...
but the melodic minor has the leading tone, which is why you use it ascending, because it leads to resolve up, and when descending, you use the natural minor because it sounds like it wants to resolve downwards.

to ts,
as mentioned earlier, in modern music, the 'traditional' rules of melodic minor have been essentially thrown out, and it is often times played both ascending and descending.
The natural minor is it's own separate scale, and ascends and descends is it is. Melodic Minor is the only scale that changes its form (that i know of)
#8
This is how most composers generally use the minor scales. Dont confuse yourself with thinking that you can only use one of them, or that you can only use the melodic minor ascending and the natural minor descending. In fact, most composers will argue that you must use elements of all three. Heres my repost:
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To say that you must play the melodic minor one way ascending and another way descending isnt entirely correct.

First off, to resolve whilst writing minor melodies, you probably should use the major seventh as it resolves really well to the root just about a semitone about it.

If your moving from above the root to the a seventh just below the root, and you want to resolve the melody, you probably should play a major seventh (meaning harmonic minor) instead of a minor seventh. This produces a strong resolution to the root.

If you want to hit that major seventh (so you can resolve to the root) without moving from above the root (so you can move upwards in pitch, not downwards), you probably should use a Major sixth instead of a minor sixth. This is because the augmented second (same as a minor third) step the minor sixth creates with the major seventh is dissonant.

If you dont want to resolve your melody, you should use the minor seventh, as it doesnt resolve as easy.

If you want to play perfect fifth, try to use a minor sixth instead of a major sixth as the minor sixth leads better to the perfect fifth.

If you want to sound eastern, try to play that minor sixth note before or after that major seventh note. For the best effect, dont play a root note and keep that dissonance hanging.

This is why many people consider writing in minor keys more difficult than major keys. The only note out of key note in major melodies that I would use regularly is the #4, as it moves really well to the perfect fifth (which can act like a second root; therefore resolving your melodies)