#1
How come that you can play the C major scale in other positions beside the 8th (for example the second position. So it starts on a F#.) ?
#3
Quote by bubbamc119
Please see this post I wrote, it should answer your question (and many others)
http://www.jsguitarforum.com/forum/showthread.php?t=56336


Stop advertising.

Basically, you can play the NOTES of the C major scale starting on any note in that scale, and you still stay in the key of C major. You cannot play the C major scale starting on an F#, however, because F# is not in the C major scale. You can play the notes of the C major scale starting on any one note of the scale. These are called modes. There are seven different basic modes, for each note of the scale. Let's use C major as an example:

C Ionian: This is the 'normal' C major scale.

CDEFGABC

D Dorian: Same notes, but starting on the 2nd note of the scale (the D)

DEFGABCD

E Phrygian: Same notes, but starting on the 3rd note of the scale (the E)

EFGABCDE

F Lydian: Same notes, but starting on the 4th note of the scale (the F)

FGABCDEF

G Mixolydian: Same notes, but starting on the 5th note, the G.#

GABCDEF

A Aeolian: Same again. It uses the same notes as the A minor scale, as A is C's relative minor (as in, A minor uses the same notes as C major)

ABCDEFGA

B Locrian: Same notes, but starting on the 7th note, the B.

BCDEFGAB
Quote by justinb904
im more of a social godzilla than chameleon

Quote by MetalMessiah665
Alright, I'll give them a try, Japanese Black Speed rarely disappoints.

Quote by azzemojo
Hmm judging from your pic you'd fit in more with a fat busted tribute.
Last edited by duncang at Jun 29, 2008,
#4
Quote by duncang
Stop advertising.

Basically, you can play the NOTES of the C major scale starting on any note in that scale, and you still stay in the key of C major. You cannot play the C major scale starting on an F#, however, because F# is not in the C major scale. You can play the notes of the C major scale starting on any one note of the scale. These are called modes. There are seven different basic modes, for each note of the scale. Let's use C major as an example:

C Ionian: This is the 'normal' C major scale.

CDEFGABC

D Dorian: Same notes, but starting on the 2nd note of the scale (the D)

DEFGABCD

E Phrygian: Same notes, but starting on the 3rd note of the scale (the E)

EFGABCDE

F Lydian: Same notes, but starting on the 4th note of the scale (the F)

FGABCDEF

G Mixolydian: Same notes, but starting on the 5th note, the G.#

GABCDEF

A Aeolian: Same again. It uses the same notes as the A minor scale, as A is C's relative minor (as in, A minor uses the same notes as C major)

ABCDEFGA

B Locrian: Same notes, but starting on the 7th note, the B.

BCDEFGAB


Don't confuse the poor guy with modes dude, that's not what he was asking.

And how is it advertising may I ask? I'm not selling anything.
#5
Quote by bubbamc119
Don't confuse the poor guy with modes dude, that's not what he was asking.

And how is it advertising may I ask? I'm not selling anything.


Almost every post you've made contains a link to that damn site. It's against the rules to excessively post links to sites that may divert UG's traffic.

I think that's essentially what he was asking, though he was probably meaning in a more practical way. Still, modes are the theory behind that.
Quote by justinb904
im more of a social godzilla than chameleon

Quote by MetalMessiah665
Alright, I'll give them a try, Japanese Black Speed rarely disappoints.

Quote by azzemojo
Hmm judging from your pic you'd fit in more with a fat busted tribute.
#6
Point taken. I'll work on making a thread with all the relevant info here. Sorry for diverting traffic, UG
#7
Actually, I have a question, not that I want to steal this thread, but usually when I'm soloing/improvising, I stay within the key, but to move around the fretboard I play the different positions (modes). However, I don't want to follow theory behind modes, so is this musically correct?

I assume it is since I'm still playing the notes within the key, but I just want to make sure.
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#8
Quote by jaffawoman
Actually, I have a question, not that I want to steal this thread, but usually when I'm soloing/improvising, I stay within the key, but to move around the fretboard I play the different positions (modes). However, I don't want to follow theory behind modes, so is this musically correct?

I assume it is since I'm still playing the notes within the key, but I just want to make sure.


If you're staying within the key, you're not actually playing modes, rather you're playing the scale of the key but starting on different notes. Modes only have meaning when the harmony is set up to emphasise the mode.
#9
Quote by jaffawoman
Actually, I have a question, not that I want to steal this thread, but usually when I'm soloing/improvising, I stay within the key, but to move around the fretboard I play the different positions (modes). However, I don't want to follow theory behind modes, so is this musically correct?

I assume it is since I'm still playing the notes within the key, but I just want to make sure.


Modes only apply when the music as a whole resolves around a different degree of the scale from the tonic (the root, C). If you're playing in C major and moving around the fretboard playing different shapes, you're still playing C major and not, for example, D Dorian because the music is still centred around C and not D.
Quote by justinb904
im more of a social godzilla than chameleon

Quote by MetalMessiah665
Alright, I'll give them a try, Japanese Black Speed rarely disappoints.

Quote by azzemojo
Hmm judging from your pic you'd fit in more with a fat busted tribute.
#10
Quote by duncang
Modes only apply when the music as a whole resolves around a different degree of the scale from the tonic (the root, C). If you're playing in C major and moving around the fretboard playing different shapes, you're still playing C major and not, for example, D Dorian because the music is still centred around C and not D.


This is correct, and it's usually the chord progression (harmony) that dictates the tonal center of the music.
#11
Ok, so C major in this way is possible

|------5--3--1---------------------------------------------
|---------------5--3---------------------------------------
|---------------------5--4--2------------------------------
|------------------------------5--3--2---------------------
|---------------------------------------5--3--2------------
|------------------------------------------------5--3------

|---------------------------------------------1--3--5------
|---------------------------------------3--5---------------
|------------------------------2--4--5---------------------
|---------------------2--3--5------------------------------
|------------2--3--5---------------------------------------
|------3--5------------------------------------------------
#12
Yes it is. But technically speaking if you're playing the C major scale, you start and end on C (fifth string, 3rd fret and third string, 5th fret).
#13
Quote by 08L1V10N
Ok, so C major in this way is possible

|------5--3--1---------------------------------------------
|---------------5--3---------------------------------------
|---------------------5--4--2------------------------------
|------------------------------5--3--2---------------------
|---------------------------------------5--3--2------------
|------------------------------------------------5--3------

|---------------------------------------------1--3--5------
|---------------------------------------3--5---------------
|------------------------------2--4--5---------------------
|---------------------2--3--5------------------------------
|------------2--3--5---------------------------------------
|------3--5------------------------------------------------


Yes. That run is in C major. However, if your piece of music is centred around the note you started on (the G), then the scale you are using is the G Lydian mode.
Quote by justinb904
im more of a social godzilla than chameleon

Quote by MetalMessiah665
Alright, I'll give them a try, Japanese Black Speed rarely disappoints.

Quote by azzemojo
Hmm judging from your pic you'd fit in more with a fat busted tribute.
#14
Quote by duncang
Yes. That run is in C major. However, if your piece of music is centred around the note you started on (the G), then the scale you are using is the G Mixolydian mode.


Fixed
#15
My bad
Quote by justinb904
im more of a social godzilla than chameleon

Quote by MetalMessiah665
Alright, I'll give them a try, Japanese Black Speed rarely disappoints.

Quote by azzemojo
Hmm judging from your pic you'd fit in more with a fat busted tribute.
#16
TS, ignore every most with the word mode, dorian, phryigan, lydian, mixolydian, aeolian, or locrian in it (except mine). Modes are much too complex to deal with until you have a firm understanding of the major scale, which you don't yet have (no offense).

The C major scale is the notes C D E F G A B, anywhere on the neck. Position, box shape, and pattern are completely irrelevant. If you play those notes over a C major progression, you're playing a C major scale. The notes can be around the 8th fret, or around the 13th fret; it doesn't matter as long as those are the notes.