#1
Ok so iam starting to learn my scales and such but iam not sure how to tell what power cords i can use with what scale like iam totally lost. i have thought that maybe u can use what ever the scale notes are but iam totally not sure. iam also not sure how to tell what scale a song is in well key. and next with scales how do i use them to build up speed.

sorry for spelling errors if there is any and thank you for the help.
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#2
Take a look at this link. It will give you all the basics for guitar theory (chord construction, cycle of fifths, what chord to use over what scale, etc.)


http://www.cyberfret.com/theory/index.php
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#3
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Ok so iam starting to learn my scales and such but iam not sure how to tell what power cords i can use with what scale like iam totally lost. i have thought that maybe u can use what ever the scale notes are but iam totally not sure. iam also not sure how to tell what scale a song is in well key. and next with scales how do i use them to build up speed.

sorry for spelling errors if there is any and thank you for the help.

First thing - learn the notes on the fretboard.

Learn the major scale and it's intervals, it's not enough to just learn a load of patterns - that won't teach you anything. Read the First "Crusade" article by Josh Urban in the columns section to give you some insight into why you should be learning these things. It's not really enough to do it because everybody else does, or because you feel you should - it's vital that you understand whay this knowledge is so important.

Finally, you don't use scales to build up speed. You can create picking exercises from scales if you want but they're no better or worse than any other exercises. You can't really build speed anyway, only accuracy. Your ability to play quickly is governed by your ability to strike and fret the strings accurately and in time, you can improve those things by working on improving your pick control and economising hand and finger movement and that in turn will allow you to play faster. If you just try to play faster though you'll just mess up.
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#4
It is helpful for you to understand the 'scale degrees' (the 7 individual notes) of the major scale. Just as there are 7 notes in the scale, there are also 7 chords in the key that the scale fits. Stick with me here. (I know there are altered chords, etc. so you techies out there please don't pound me with emails)

Let's look at the key of C Major. The notes in the scale and the key are:

C D E F G A B C (octave). The scale degrees are:
C=1, D=2, E=3, F=4, G=5, A=6, B=7, C=8 (octave)

The pattern of the major scale is always made up of half-steps (H) (1 fret increments) and whole-steps (W) (2 fret increments). The pattern for a major scale starting from the first scale degree is always:

W-W-H-W-W-W-H

From C to D is a whole step, from D to E is a whole step, from E to F is a half step, etc. This is ALWAYS the pattern for a major scale starting on the root (in this case C).

Just as the scale has a pattern, so does the key when it comes to the chords that are part of that key. Instead of half and whole steps for individual notes, we look at a pattern of Major and minor chords. M=Major, and m=minor. The pattern for the chords in the key of C Major is:

M m m M M m m

So for the key of C Major the chords are:

C Major (the 1 chord) written I
D minor (the 2 chord) written ii
E minor (the 3 chord) written iii
F Major (the 4 chord) written IV
G Major (the 5 chord) written V
A minor (the 6 chord) written vi
B diminished (minor), (the 7 chord) written vii dim, and finally back to
C Major

The 1 chord is ALWAYS a Major chord with the root note being the #1 scale degree, the 2 chord is ALWAYS a minor chord with the root note being the #2 scale degree, etc., get it?

It may seem confusing right now, but it's really not. If you can count to 7 (and I bet you can) you can understand the basics of music theory. Spend the required time to understand this and you will be amazed how quickly you'll improve.

So, learn the pattern for the scale and don't ever attempt to play it faster than you can do so perfectly. Otherwise you will be training your hands to learn the mistakes, thus making you a fast, sloppy guitar player. Learn them slowly and the speed will come, I promise. Also, practice with a metronome. It's the only way to increase your speed effectively.

Check out http://www.reallylearnguitar.com/majscalestutorial.htm and http://www.reallylearnguitar.com/modestutorial.htm for great tutorials on scales and their relationships to chords and modes.
Jam On!