#1
hey guys i have a little situation , we dont know what the hell we need to start recording. We have a computer and a room and a $1500 budget so tell us what you think.
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gibson les paul standard 50's neck
Taylor 210e
Michael kelly patriot shadow
strat copy
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marshall dsl 100
peavey windsor straight and slant/W/wgs veteran 30's
crate g130
vox ad50vt

ehx big muff
#3
I really don't think you should be spending $1500 on recording equipment if you don't know what to get.
Instead spend the money to rent out a studio to get some proper pro recordings done.


You really don't need much to start recording. $200-$500 are more than enough to get you started. But then buying the stuff doesn't mean you can now record brilliant tracks. Recording and mixing requires some serious skill and knowledge and it takes years to get good it at. No one can pick up a bunch of softwares, a sound interface and become a producer.

So i really advise you to learn some recording and production basics before you decide to spend all that money into it.
#4
What are you guys planning to play? Is it two guys and two instruments? And are any of them acoustic drums? $1500 can last you quite a while and give you good quality recordings, so I definitely recommend going with equipment rather than studio time.

This could inspire you too.
Quote by keiron_d
thank you sooooooo much for the advice Fast_Fingers...i would hug you if i could...i looooove you!


True love exists in UG. Can you feel it?

Recording Guitar Amps 101
#5
$1500 is a lot for someone who's just getting into recording and hardly knows anything about recording.
I agree you can set up a pretty sweet production rig for that money but its no use if the person doesn't know anything about production.
And you'ld hafta be a pretty decent producer to be able to make good use out of such an expensive rig...
A newbie is gonna sound no different whether he's recording on the free Reaper sequencer or working on an industry standard Pro Tools HD system.
#6
I wasn't suggesting he spend it all in one go. And to be honest, a lot of recording and production involves diving in and trying out stuff. It doesn't hurt to have a studio that you can grow into and keep using as you get better.

And yeah, I wasn't going to suggest Pro Tools (or Nuendo) for a newbie.
Quote by keiron_d
thank you sooooooo much for the advice Fast_Fingers...i would hug you if i could...i looooove you!


True love exists in UG. Can you feel it?

Recording Guitar Amps 101
#7
we have pro tools its 2 guitars, vocals, bass, and electric drums
My Gear
gibson les paul standard 50's neck
Taylor 210e
Michael kelly patriot shadow
strat copy
squire :p
marshall dsl 100
peavey windsor straight and slant/W/wgs veteran 30's
crate g130
vox ad50vt

ehx big muff
#9
Quote by emo killer
we have pro tools its 2 guitars, vocals, bass, and electric drums


Oh. So do you plan on recording these all at once? And how familiar are you with using PT? An M-audio Profire 2626 or NRV10 could be a good idea.
Quote by keiron_d
thank you sooooooo much for the advice Fast_Fingers...i would hug you if i could...i looooove you!


True love exists in UG. Can you feel it?

Recording Guitar Amps 101
#10
Okay.... so if you have ProTools, you must also have an interface. In order to get ProTools, you either have to have already purchased an M-Audio card, or some other type of interface, like an M-Box, or Digi001 or Digi002.

Letting us know what kind of interface you have will be helpful too.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.