#1
Well as some of you might know, I'm an avid filmmaker (just got my Canon XHA1) and is doing an upcoming film. In it, during one scene the characters are at a bar listening to a song. SInce we want to be able to show the film at all kinds of film festivals and so on, we want to avoid music that have copyright on it.

So we though if we recorded a cover of House Of The Rising Sun it would be free of copyright. The song is a traditional folk song and hence has no writers (though Alan Price was credited for arrengement in the Animals version), so hence, it would be copyright free, correct?
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#2
No.

You CAN use the song in the movie, but you need to contact Mr. Price for permission to use it in your movie. No matter where you show it, you'll still have permission.
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#3
No idea.

You could always google music copyrights or something along those lines.
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#4
Quote by yurfinlfntsy
No.

You CAN use the song in the movie, but you need to contact Mr. Price for permission to use it in your movie. No matter where you show it, you'll still have permission.


Think you are wrong there. It is infact a traditional folk song. Anyone could make a version of it. Don't take my word for it though.
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#5
If you cant get hold of Mr.Price, why not record your own song which is very similar to House Of The Rising Sun?
Would that work?
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#6
Quote by yurfinlfntsy
No.

You CAN use the song in the movie, but you need to contact Mr. Price for permission to use it in your movie. No matter where you show it, you'll still have permission.


If they're not using his arrangement, and he's not the writer, there'd be no reason to have to contact him.
At least I don't think.
#7
I think you can record a cover of it, maybe you ought to credit the Animals for the song though, but I think you have the rights to do so.
#8
Quote by Deflection
Think you are wrong there. It is infact a traditional folk song. Anyone could make a version of it. Don't take my word for it though.



It may be, but it was originally recorded for profit by the Animals. I'm just saying what you would have to go through in the U.S.


Since the TS is in Sweden, I cannot deduce whether it would be alright or not. I don't know the laws there.
Play the man, Master Ridley; we shall this day light such a candle, by God's grace, in England, as I trust shall never be put out.
#10
Quote by yurfinlfntsy
It may be, but it was originally recorded for profit by the Animals. I'm just saying what you would have to go through in the U.S.


Since the TS is in Sweden, I cannot deduce whether it would be alright or not. I don't know the laws there.


Actually there were MANY MANY MANY recordings before it.

The Animals did NOT write the song, nor the melody. They did do their own arrengement, however if you listen to earlier versions of it, many have a similar arregement. They're all based of the same chords. Also the reason HOTRS would work is because the jukebox were using as a prop actually has that song in it, so we can then show the actual LP being played.

And if somebody didn't see, we will records OUR OWN version of it, not use a prerecorded one.

And while Whiskey In The Jar is good, it wouldn't work, because Thin Lizzy DID write the moeldy and parts for the song.
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18watter video demo

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Recognised by the Official EG/GG&A Who To Listen To List 2009