#1
Will decreasing the action of my acoustic guitar make my hammer-ons and pull-offs sound better? Would it affect the harmonics in any way? And if yes, in a good way or bad way?


EDIT: The reason I ask is because i've been practicing a new technique, and for some reason only the 12th fret's harmonics ring like hell while the others are very distinct (such as the harmonics on frets 7 and 5).
Guitars:
'11 Gibson Buckethead LP
'97 Fender Cali Series Strat
?? Samick Bass
'01 Fernandes Dragonfly Elite
Last edited by bluezombie at Jun 29, 2008,
#3
Ever play an electric and do hammers and pulls on that? They're a lot easier than on an acoustic. You need quite a bit more finger strength to pull them off on an acoustic, but they're very rewarding once you get them down. And as for harmonics, might I suggest a bone saddle? If you guitar has a plastic one, even if it's Tusq, you would benefit from upgrading to true bone. There's really no comparison. Everything is better. The guitar will really open up for you if you decide to make the change. I'm not sure which guitar you're talking about, but it may be something to think about.
#4
Quote by LeftyDave
Ever play an electric and do hammers and pulls on that? They're a lot easier than on an acoustic. You need quite a bit more finger strength to pull them off on an acoustic, but they're very rewarding once you get them down. And as for harmonics, might I suggest a bone saddle? If you guitar has a plastic one, even if it's Tusq, you would benefit from upgrading to true bone. There's really no comparison. Everything is better. The guitar will really open up for you if you decide to make the change. I'm not sure which guitar you're talking about, but it may be something to think about.

I have a Yamaha LL500, according to harmony central reviews, they easily compare to a 2000+ martin.
Guitars:
'11 Gibson Buckethead LP
'97 Fender Cali Series Strat
?? Samick Bass
'01 Fernandes Dragonfly Elite
#5
I don't find the LL500 model anywhere I've searched, which was at Yamaha, MusiciansFriend, and Harmony Central. At any rate, before you decide to lower the action, it'd be a good idea for you to get a few measurments so that you have a baseline with which to reference later should you want to put the guitar back to factory specs. Measure as accurately as possible from low and high E strings at the 1st fret and at the 12th fret. Measure tuned to standard pitch from the bottom of the at rest string to the crown of the frets. Record these measurments and keep safe. That way if you mess up the saddle, you can fashion a new one and get the action back to where it was fairly easily.
Lowering the action may change the intonation a bit, so just be aware that it may be off after the job. To actually lower the action, you would sand off the bottom of the bridge saddle. 1/32nd of an inch off the bottom of the saddle will lower the action at the 12th fret by 1/64th of an inch. It's exactly half because the 12th fret is exactly the half way point between the saddle and nut.