#1
Ok im a really dedicated guitarist but very new to music theory or even getting into routine practicing. Im one of those guys that learned song that were fun to play for three years and picked up everything from it. But for the past year or so ive been going to a guitar instructor and he has really influenced me to practice like crazy (him and petrucci that is) and i do practice ALOT and i will keep doing so. But when i practice its not fulfilling enough. I dont feel like im actually getting better even when i use a metronome and sometimes i get so hopeless with the whole music theory thing. Ive just started learning the major scale and the CAGED method of it but i have no idea what the significance of the CAGED method is and i dont know a good way to practice the scales to get them dead set in my head. Im also doing sweep picking which im also confused with because i dont even know how many different shapes there are to practice or anything. The problem with me isnt that "i dont know" its that i dont know what TO ASK about which is worse to me. I want to actually understand my guitar instead of feeling so limited when i try to make a song or even mess around on it.Can anyone out there help me?
(and im not saying my guitar instructor is bad or anything BTW he is actually very helpful,but half an hour a week doesnt give me enough time to ask the right questions or for him to explain hardly anything to me.
#2
You know the open C,A,G,E,and D chords? Well you can turn them into barre chords to move them all around the fretboard. That's what CAGED is. It's quite simple. I should post back in here with a lot more stuff.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#3
Oh yes i know that u can turn them into barre chords and such but i dont understand why the major scale has these five patterns in the first place.
#4
Quote by Maxtheguitarst
Oh yes i know that u can turn them into barre chords and such but i dont understand why the major scale has these five patterns in the first place.


It's just a method of memorizing the Major scale.

One thing you have to remember is that theory isn't a set of rules, it's a guide to what generally sounds good. You don't use theory to write a song, you use theory to figure out how to tell others what you're doing and so others can tell you what they're doing.
#6
Try not to think of scales as patterns. I've never heard of CAGED being a method for learning the major scale. I lived w/o it and i'm fine. Scales are really a collection of notes. You can play any scale however you want (you can add in notes that aren't in the scale too) because there is a lot of freedom. Any easy way just to learn, not to play a scale (though it's easy to play a scale this way) is to learn box shapes.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#7
yes i know this is easy to play but i want to understand it through and through because it seems to be the base of every other scale,ya know? So what exactly are Box Shapes? and thanks for taking some time to help me out a little.
#8
^Yeah, that's what this forum is for. I wish when i was beginning that i would ask more questions in here and learn a lot quicker.

Example of a box shape of a scale:

|o|-|-|o|
|o|-|o|-|
|o|-|o|-|
|o|-|o|-|
|o|-|-|o|


That's the minor pentatonic box shape. I wouldn't worry too much about the name of it right now though.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#10
I don't quite get what you're askin there, sorry?
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#12
I have found the C-A-G-E-D method of learning the fretboard really useful.

It uses five different shapes to play the same chord up the fretboard. C-A-G-E-D refers to the chord when each shape is played in open position. But think of them as Shape 1, 2, 3, 4, & 5. This will be less confusing in the long run.

When playing each shape you want to drum into your head three distinct things.
First the Root Shape.
Second the Chord Shape.
Third the full "box" scale pattern.

The good thing about this system of learning your major scale and fretboard is that each pattern is follows directly on from the previous.

For example take Pattern 1.
The root notes are found on the second string and fifth string two frets apart
e|----|----|----|----|
b|-X-|----|----|----|
g|----|----|----|----|
d|----|----|----|----|
a|----|----|-X-|----|
E|----|----|----|----|

in the key of E this would be the B string at the 5th fret and the A string at the 7th fret.

Then for Pattern 2 (based on the open A chord shape) the root shape is on the 5th string and 3rd string two frets apart.
e|----|----|----|----|
b|----|----|----|----|
g|----|----|-X-|----|
d|----|----|----|----|
a|-X-|----|----|----|
E|----|----|----|----|

You will notice the two patterns share a root note. Hence learning the five patterns will give you the major scale covering the entire fretboard.

Once these are learned you need to learn to link these patterns in ascending and descending runs.

When you have done all this you should be pretty comfortable coming up with runs covering parts of two, three, four, or even all five patterns. You will also be comfortable jumping from improvising a solo up around the 1st 2nd and 3rd frets to the 9th 10th and 11th frets without any problems whatsoever.

It also burns in your mind the different options of playing the same chord in five different positions by playing a full or part of each of the five barre chords.

Some people may say box patterns are "restricting" or limit your playing. Learning box patterns is a great way to get to know your way around the fretboard and to learn scales. If you know five overlapping box patterns that cover the entire range of the fretboard and can easily link them in anyway your imagination will let you the box patterns have not limited you but helped you get to a point where you can express yourself with more freedom.

Best way to learn them is to practice one pattern for five to ten minutes everyday for a week then a different pattern the next week. After five weeks practice two patterns (say patterns 1 and 2) and experiment with different ways of linking them together everyday for a week then move on to the next two patterns (patterns 2 and 3).

When you practice make sure you practice playing the barre chord shape and make special note of where the root notes are.

Hope this helps some.
Si
#13
helps alot man
thanks

but now im confused about sweeping could CAGE apply to 3,4,5,6 string sweeps?
#14
Quote by Maxtheguitarst
helps alot man
thanks

but now im confused about sweeping could CAGE apply to 3,4,5,6 string sweeps?


I'm more a finger picker myself but I'm sure there's some shredders on this site that can help you with that one.

I always thought of sweep picking as a technique used for one note per string particularly effective for arpeggiated chords. It can be used with alternative picking and legato techniques to give more than one note per string.

CAGED (you forgot the D) is a way of learning your major scale patterns over the entire fretboard.

Knowing your major scale will help you when constructing your diatonic triads as well as extended chords.
And simply knowing how to barre the open five chords will allow you to not only play any chord up and down the fretboard but allow you to play many different chords on the same frets high on the fretboard. A skill I imagine would be beneficial to a sweep picker.

Learning the CAGED system will not make you a better sweep picker but will help your guitar playing and your ability to construct a series of notes that you can play whether it be by sweep picking, alternate picking, legato (hammer ons and pull offs), or fingerpicking.

To summarize: the CAGED is a system of learning and understanding the major scale across your fretboard and sweep picking is a specific playing technique two distinct things but mastering both will improve your playing.
Si