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#1
I'm replacing one of my humbuckers on my Ephiphone LP Special 2. Right now the stock ones are on it, but I'm getting the Gibson 57 Classic humbucker. I'm wondering whether I should replace the bridge humbucker or the other one. Would it make a difference or doesn't it matter? Any advice would be helpful because this is the first time I've replaced something on my guitar.
#2
i would replace the bridge humbucker, but not with a 57 classic... well acutally what do you play?
Quote by HomerHitter
I got a black Les Paul, and this Texan told me it wasn't as good as other color guitars becuse it was a 'nigger.'


Quote by Felgate
can anyone tell me how i get a tone similar to what avril lavigne uses in skater boy please?
#3
Well, yes it will make rather a lot of difference whether you replace the neck pickup or the bridge pickup. Generally in my experience, Epiphone's stock neck pickup is better than their bridge pickup, so if I were you I'd buy the bridge pickup version and replace that.

But do you actually need a pickup change? Why are you chaning pickups? If you are changing them to get more output, do you actually need more output (i.e. if you are maxing out your amp)? If you want to change your tone, think about changing your amp instead; the amp makes up more of your tone than any part of the guitar itself, and pickups are one of the smallest contributors to overall tone (not to mention, good pickups through a bad amp will still sound bad; but bad pickups through a good amp can sound okay).
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#4
i wouldnt waste such a good pickup on such a bad guitar.
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#5
I play lots of different kinds of rock, sometimes funk, blues. I want to replace it because I upgraded my amp and I want to try to complete a different sound than I have. My strings buzz as well and I've changed gauges, amps, and cables and it's still bad. And the standard humbuckers can't seem to reach the power I want.
#6
Quote by real6
I play lots of different kinds of rock, sometimes funk, blues. I want to replace it because I upgraded my amp and I want to try to complete a different sound than I have. My strings buzz as well and I've changed gauges, amps, and cables and it's still bad. And the standard humbuckers can't seem to reach the power I want.


ok yeah i think you need a professinal setup on your guitar, just go to your local music store and say i would like a setup, they should charge you 20-50 dollars and when you get it back there should be no buzzing or anything.

for the pick ups, i would replace the bridge first, replace the neck pup if you can, get a seymour duncan jb for the bridge. And if you have enough for the neck pup get a seymour duncan jazz or 59
Quote by HomerHitter
I got a black Les Paul, and this Texan told me it wasn't as good as other color guitars becuse it was a 'nigger.'


Quote by Felgate
can anyone tell me how i get a tone similar to what avril lavigne uses in skater boy please?
#7
Well the strings buzzing is because of the guitar, so changing pickups, cables and amps wont fix that. You would be better off with a new guitar, or put up with the buzz and get a better amp
#8
Quote by littlephil
Well the strings buzzing is because of the guitar, so changing pickups, cables and amps wont fix that. You would be better off with a new guitar, or put up with the buzz and get a better amp


I already chnged my amp, ad it's not just the string buzzing, I have gotten over that mostly, it's that the present humbuckers don't have the right sound I want.
#9
But most of the sound comes from your amp! Changing the pickups will change the sound a little bit, but your amp is the main component of your tone. What amp do you have now?
#12
not to mention there is absolutely no purpose to upgrade that guitar- It's plywood for god sake.
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Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
#13
Quote by forsaknazrael
Don't bother changing your pickups. Those Frontman amps are crap, sorry.


I thought it sounded pretty good. I ove the sounds I get from it.
#15
Because my old amp was crap, but my new one sounds so much better and I figure if I upgrade my pickups I can get a better sound
#16
You probably wouldn't even notice a difference in sound. Frontmans (like most transistor amps) aren't the most clear or transparent amps, so the sound of your guitar doesn't really come to the surface.
#18
Quote by oneblackened
not to mention there is absolutely no purpose to upgrade that guitar- It's plywood for god sake.


No, it's a 2-3 piece basswood or phillipine mohagany body(depending on year, factory, and general availability of wood)
...
Please do not insinuate anything sexual from that.

Quote by cobain_is_king
If your friends don't like your guitar, cover it in stickers and it'll be teh rawks!
#19
I like my guitar alot too. Maybe I don't need to upgrade my pickups, but I want to. It sounds good for a cheap guitar and I don't want to replace it. I probably will upgrade my amp someday, but right now I'm just going or the humbucker, even if it doesn't make that much of a difference.
#20
I'd say make these changes:
A. Professional setup. Get the action set, nut filed(or replaced, the stock plastic nut on epis is pretty bad), intonation.
B. New amp. Epiphone valve junior will run you less than replacing both pickups with SD or gibson.
C. New pots and wiring. Hardwired tone and individual volume through 500k gibson potentiometers really improves the sound of this guitar, even with lower-quality pickups to start.
D. New pickups. I'd suggest GFS vintage 59s, for what you're looking for.
E. Look into pedals.

Do these in THIS order, as you acquire skills, feel and tone.
...
Please do not insinuate anything sexual from that.

Quote by cobain_is_king
If your friends don't like your guitar, cover it in stickers and it'll be teh rawks!
#21
Quote by real6
I like my guitar alot too. Maybe I don't need to upgrade my pickups, but I want to. It sounds good for a cheap guitar and I don't want to replace it. I probably will upgrade my amp someday, but right now I'm just going or the humbucker, even if it doesn't make that much of a difference.

Well, see you don't seem to understand the thought process behind replacing pickups.
It's for tweaking your tone. Not for simply "improving it". You can't make a good decision on pickups right now, if you don't have your "ideal" amp.
#22
Quote by Iansmitchell
I'd say make these changes:
A. Professional setup. Get the action set, nut filed(or replaced, the stock plastic nut on epis is pretty bad), intonation.
B. New amp. Epiphone valve junior will run you less than replacing both pickups with SD or gibson.
C. New pots and wiring. Hardwired tone and individual volume through 500k gibson potentiometers really improves the sound of this guitar, even with lower-quality pickups to start.
D. New pickups. I'd suggest GFS vintage 59s, for what you're looking for.
E. Look into pedals.

Do these in THIS order, as you acquire skills, feel and tone.


What's the "pot" and what's the "nut"?
#23
Quote by real6
What's the "pot" and what's the "nut"?


A pot, or potentiometer is the device which controls your volume or tone.
For humbuckers, a 500k audio potentiometer is perfectly balanced for tone and control.

For some reason, epiphone likes to put in 300k audio potentiometers, which quell output and make pickups sound muddy and dark, as well as making the controls less responsive.

As for hard wiring the tone to get two volumes, it's the simplest way to give your pickups individual volume control and take a cloak off of the brightness of your pickups. You can also use Push-Pull potentiometers to control individual volume and otne, but you will lose some brightness, even on 10, and the wiring isn't for beginners.

The nut is the piece of (currently)plastic between your tuners and your frets. Your strings go through it.
THe height of the slots which your strings go through affects how high your strings are off of the fretboard.
Soft plastic nuts allow the strings to dig in, increasing friction, making tuning instable.
Graphite nuts are self-lubricating, and allow strings to move very freely.
...
Please do not insinuate anything sexual from that.

Quote by cobain_is_king
If your friends don't like your guitar, cover it in stickers and it'll be teh rawks!
#24
Quote by Iansmitchell
No, it's a 2-3 piece basswood or phillipine mohagany body(depending on year, factory, and general availability of wood)

I was pretty sure it was plywood. Actually, I'm quite surprised that A beginner's guitar would have wood similar to mahogany (the real stuff, you know, Honduran) or Basswood. I'm not too sure the neck is really mahogany though; it was some kind of soft junk on my G-310.
Current Gear:
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Audient iD22 interface
Peavey Revalver 4, UAD Friedman BE100/DS40
Adam S3A monitors
Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
Last edited by oneblackened at Jun 30, 2008,
#25
Quote by oneblackened
I was pretty sure it was plywood. Actually, I'm quite surprised that A beginner's guitar would have wood similar to mahogany (the real stuff, you know, Honduran) or Basswood. I'm not too sure the neck is really mahogany though; it was some kind of soft junk on my G-310.


Phillipine mohagany of that particular grade is closer to agathis than hundruran mohagany, actually, so that might make it less confusing. Gibson uses phillipine mohagany in some of its gibson guitars, too, but that's of a different grade. The SG faded, I believe uses high grade phillipine mohagany.

Basswood isn't uncommon at all in beginner's guitars, either, difference between basswood in an LP junior or squier bullet and steve vai's guitar is that vai's is a single piece, whereas the LP junior and bullet utilize 2-3 piece bodies. It may or may not have a big effect on sound, but it does have a big effect on cost(15-30 year old trees versus 2000+ years).

Some speculation on the necks has been going around on epiphone guitars recently.
While the specs will only say either maple or mohagany, some interesting substitutions have been fond in the guitars made between 2000 and 2007, before they switched to the current dedicated all-epiphone plant. I've heard it identified as agathis, but identifying wood, particularly after it's down to that size, sanded down, prepared and crafted, is an inexact science for most of the people interested. I think it's just a poor grade of phillipine mohagany, or even basswood (which is very soft, and has little or no grain and tensile strength, not a good neck choice at all).
...
Please do not insinuate anything sexual from that.

Quote by cobain_is_king
If your friends don't like your guitar, cover it in stickers and it'll be teh rawks!
#26
Quote by Iansmitchell
Phillipine mohagany of that particular grade is closer to agathis than hundruran mohagany, actually, so that might make it less confusing. Gibson uses phillipine mohagany in some of its gibson guitars, too, but that's of a different grade. The SG faded, I believe uses high grade phillipine mohagany.

Basswood isn't uncommon at all in beginner's guitars, either, difference between basswood in an LP junior or squier bullet and steve vai's guitar is that vai's is a single piece, whereas the LP junior and bullet utilize 2-3 piece bodies. It may or may not have a big effect on sound, but it does have a big effect on cost(15-30 year old trees versus 2000+ years).

Some speculation on the necks has been going around on epiphone guitars recently.
While the specs will only say either maple or mohagany, some interesting substitutions have been fond in the guitars made between 2000 and 2007, before they switched to the current dedicated all-epiphone plant. I've heard it identified as agathis, but identifying wood, particularly after it's down to that size, sanded down, prepared and crafted, is an inexact science for most of the people interested. I think it's just a poor grade of phillipine mohagany, or even basswood (which is very soft, and has little or no grain and tensile strength, not a good neck choice at all)
.

Yeah, it actually did look like a piece of basswood. it would explain my g-310's neck bowing beyond adjustment. truth be told, maple/wenge/mahogany/walnut (maple with any of the other three) make the strongest necks.
It appears we have another Gibson/Epiphone expert on our hands (bohuko is the other).
I have a question for you: what are the higher-level epiphones made of (standard and up)?
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Audient iD22 interface
Peavey Revalver 4, UAD Friedman BE100/DS40
Adam S3A monitors
Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
Last edited by oneblackened at Jun 30, 2008,
#27
Quote by oneblackened
Yeah, it actually did look like a piece of basswood. it would explain my g-310's neck bowing beyond adjustment. truth be told, maple/wenge/mahogany/walnut (maple with any of the other three) make the strongest necks.


Wholeheartedly agreed on hard maple making the best necks.
The only gibson/epi guitar that has one, however, is the zakk wylde signiture.
It's also cool how they did just the playing part unfinished, but kept the fretboard binding, and headstock painted, very classy.
...
Please do not insinuate anything sexual from that.

Quote by cobain_is_king
If your friends don't like your guitar, cover it in stickers and it'll be teh rawks!
#28
Quote by oneblackened
Y\
I have a question for you: what are the higher-level epiphones made of (standard and up)?


Those phase out the basswood, and are just phillipine or african mohagany, and of the higher grades, same as gibson's lower end and standard guitar. The elitists use exclusively african mohagany, same as the high end and custom shop gibsons.
The maple tops(on all but the elitest and zakk wylde LP), however, are 1/32" maple veneers.
...
Please do not insinuate anything sexual from that.

Quote by cobain_is_king
If your friends don't like your guitar, cover it in stickers and it'll be teh rawks!
#29
yeah, I knew about the veneers.
Current Gear:
LTD MH-400 with Gotoh GE1996T (EMG 85/60)
PRS SE Custom 24 (Suhr SSH+/SSV)
Ibanez RG3120 Prestige (Dimarzio Titans)
Squier Vintage Modified 70s Jazz V
Audient iD22 interface
Peavey Revalver 4, UAD Friedman BE100/DS40
Adam S3A monitors
Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
#31
Quote by forsaknazrael
^^You know, I always have a hard time stomaching some of the stuff you say, Iansmitchell, considering you're 14.


I'm homeschooled, alot of free time makes up for less years.
I'm also 15 in 4 days.(happy birthday to me!)

Most of my info comes from the guys around the epiphone.com forums, and I'll assure, you, they are significantly older. But I have some definite experience of my own.
...
Please do not insinuate anything sexual from that.

Quote by cobain_is_king
If your friends don't like your guitar, cover it in stickers and it'll be teh rawks!
#32
Well, the Fender distortion isn't as bad as people make it out to be. It doesn't have the clarity that some amps have, but it's cleans are great. And it's lower end overdrive (blues) is pretty nice.

I have a Fender FM-65 DSP with Greenback Celests, and I have it bypassed with another amp, and I use this amp for my cleans and its onboard efx are pretty nice too.

All in all, Pick ups do make a large difference in the over all sound, and can create a fatter or thinner sound.

I would change the bridge pick up if I where you. Add some Burstbucker Pros...it gives a warmer sound with a little more output.
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#33
Quote by Iansmitchell
A pot, or potentiometer is the device which controls your volume or tone.
For humbuckers, a 500k audio potentiometer is perfectly balanced for tone and control.

For some reason, epiphone likes to put in 300k audio potentiometers, which quell output and make pickups sound muddy and dark, as well as making the controls less responsive.

As for hard wiring the tone to get two volumes, it's the simplest way to give your pickups individual volume control and take a cloak off of the brightness of your pickups. You can also use Push-Pull potentiometers to control individual volume and otne, but you will lose some brightness, even on 10, and the wiring isn't for beginners.

The nut is the piece of (currently)plastic between your tuners and your frets. Your strings go through it.
THe height of the slots which your strings go through affects how high your strings are off of the fretboard.
Soft plastic nuts allow the strings to dig in, increasing friction, making tuning instable.
Graphite nuts are self-lubricating, and allow strings to move very freely.


You sure about that. I'm pretty sure there upper end guitars (LP Standards and G-400's) use 500k pots.

Meh, my cousin in-law is gonna give me a 1000k pot and I'm gonna switch out my ceramics on my SG 400 to EMG active 81/85s.

He said that the 1000k pot really shines the guitars tone.
GEAR
Epiphone SG-400
Marshall 1987 JCM-800 2210 100W

Proud Member of:
The SG Owners Unite
Marshall Amplification
EHX Users Guild

The True Eccentric Tea Drinking Appreciation Preservation Society

#34
Quote by Weeping_Demon7
You sure about that. I'm pretty sure there upper end guitars (LP Standards and G-400's) use 500k pots.

Meh, my cousin in-law is gonna give me a 1000k pot and I'm gonna switch out my ceramics on my SG 400 to EMG active 81/85s.

He said that the 1000k pot really shines the guitars tone.


I think the G-400 may use 500k pots, but gibson usa 500k pots are still an improvement for the asian made 500ks they put in.

You can't use a 1000K pot with actives. The brightness will feedback like hell.
You use 25k pots, stereo input jack, and batteries.
...
Please do not insinuate anything sexual from that.

Quote by cobain_is_king
If your friends don't like your guitar, cover it in stickers and it'll be teh rawks!
#35
Personally, the only improvement, from an electrical standpoint, to upgrading pots would be:
1 - somewhat more reliable.
2 - Better tolerance. Potentiometers have varying tolerances, and ones on CTS pots are much better than Epiphone's. So the value will be much close to the reported vale of 500K.

Other than that, there isn't going to be much of a tonal difference. It's a variable resistor, set in a very simple passive circuit. The type of material (carbon comp, carbon film...) isn't going to change the tone much.
#36
Quote by forsaknazrael
Personally, the only improvement, from an electrical standpoint, to upgrading pots would be:
1 - somewhat more reliable.
2 - Better tolerance. Potentiometers have varying tolerances, and ones on CTS pots are much better than Epiphone's. So the value will be much close to the reported vale of 500K.

Other than that, there isn't going to be much of a tonal difference. It's a variable resistor, set in a very simple passive circuit. The type of material (carbon comp, carbon film...) isn't going to change the tone much.


Tone? No. Control? Hell yes.
...
Please do not insinuate anything sexual from that.

Quote by cobain_is_king
If your friends don't like your guitar, cover it in stickers and it'll be teh rawks!
#38
My Special II has 500k pots in it so I think instead I'll try to change the nut, but can I do that myself or take it to someone.
#39
Quote by real6
My Special II has 500k pots in it so I think instead I'll try to change the nut, but can I do that myself or take it to someone.

Not unless you already replaced them yourself. They ship stock with 300k pots, trust me.
...
Please do not insinuate anything sexual from that.

Quote by cobain_is_king
If your friends don't like your guitar, cover it in stickers and it'll be teh rawks!
#40
No I didn't. Today was the first day I opened up the back and they had 500's in them.
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