#1
can someone enlighten me? I know how they both feel different but what are the uses usually meant for? thanks.
#3
the j bass has single coil pickups which give you high mids the p-bass has a split single coil which gives you a warmer bassier tone
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#4
P basses have a warmer tone, as TANKER69 said, which is very useful in a rock band, and are more common in punk rock and metal than J basses, but J basses are, as it's obvious, very good for jazz. They have the brighter tone, which is very good for slap bass, and so make it more popular in funk too. I've noticed P basses sound better when using picks than J basses do, but I'm sure I can be proven wrong.

Aesthetically, the J bass' bottom is on a slant, and the controls are mounted on a control plate, and the pickups are routed in parallel (except with the American Jazzes, which have the S-1 switch to change it to series, giving it a warmer, but punchy tone, similar to a P bass), with one at the bridge, and one at the neck. The P bass has a flat bottom and the controls are mounted on the tail of the pickguard. The split coil on a P is placed in the middle so the sound isn't too muddy (which is what would happen if it was closer to the neck). P basses sometimes have a J pickup by the bridge to add mid tones, and brighten up the sound some more.

Neck wise - which seems to be the big factor when choosing between these two basses - the P bass has a wider neck, giving the ability to hit strings easier and bend much easier, whereas the J bass has a thinner neck, with speed in mind. This part is completely personal preference, and if a person doesn't like the J bass or P bass, it's usually down to the neck.

These are the main differences.
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#5
Like John said, the neck is one of the biggest factors.

I prefer the J bass.

So just try out both at a music store. I am not sure who it was, maybe SlyTaco, but he had a j bass neck on a p bass body. So if you like components of each, you could try what he did.
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#6
Quote by Jonn0
P basses have a warmer tone, as TANKER69 said, which is very useful in a rock band, and are more common in punk rock and metal than J basses,


Actually, I tend to see far more Jazz basses in metal then P basses. The jazz has that cutting power, which the P lacks.
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#7
Yeah, its weird, I used to thought the P bass was more aggressive and modern sounding, and the jazz a smooth warm tone.
Quote by breakdown123
Is there such a thing as a heavy riff with out chugging on the e string?
#8
altho if you dont like either the jazz or P bass neck on the corresponding body you could always buy a replacement neck. i.e. Frank bello's jazz bass sig has a P bass neck while Duff Mckagan has a Jazz bass neck on his sig P bass.
#9
Quote by gm jack
Actually, I tend to see far more Jazz basses in metal then P basses. The jazz has that cutting power, which the P lacks.


To be honest, I don't see many Fender basses in general in metal. The jazz has got the extra boost behind it I've noticed, but they're strong mids. I would believe the bassier sound would be a bigger preference for metal.
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#10
I'm new to bass so this could be useless info, but a friend who is experienced described them like this to me:

Jazz bass is like a claw hammer, it has punch and can do a few jobs and is medium weight.

Precision bass is like a sledgehammer, its a heavy beast which can do one job very well.

I understand what he meant, I'm thinking of going the precision route myself, as I have a wall in my house to knock down soon so it could help with that too.
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#11
It seems to me that the Precision is the simple one- it does one sound, but that sound can be used in anything.

The jazz is the versatile one that can basically do anything.
#12
Quote by gm jack
Actually, I tend to see far more Jazz basses in metal then P basses. The jazz has that cutting power, which the P lacks.

actually i find really easy to cut trough the mix with a P and with a J i fell i am only filling the tone of the guitar
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#13
I know a guy in a some-what big band, and a small side band, and he uses a Jazz bass for gigs, and his Warwick for recording. They're "Thrash-Death"
Quote by breakdown123
Is there such a thing as a heavy riff with out chugging on the e string?
#14
Quote by CLIFF_BURTON
I know a guy in a some-what big band, and a small side band, and he uses a Jazz bass for gigs, and his Warwick for recording. They're "Thrash-Death"


i am guessing he likes the tone of his warwick for metal but he feels comfortable with his j bass wich doesnt sound bad for metal, but is just not the same thing as a warwick
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#15
I personally prefer the slap sound on my P-bass to my J-bass. Of course my J-bass is a 5, thus making it very hard for me to imitate a 4-string slap... I prefer the deeper, fuller sound of the Precision for slap though.
#16
In a genre like metal, where the guitars have use of bass (on the EQ), a J-bass may be the best option as its tone can pierce the distortion fuzz better. However, if your guitarists use a more crunchy or twangy sound, a P-bass will be able to "tuck underneath" the guitars by filling out the low frequencies that the sound of the guitars doesn't touch.
#17
Quote by litus
actually i find really easy to cut trough the mix with a P and with a J i fell i am only filling the tone of the guitar


Then I feel you may need some practise EQing.

The jazz has a lot of bite to it, and still has plently of low end. If you have trouble getting through with that, you are either being completely overpowered or are EQing poorly.
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#18
well the precision is called that because of its preicise fingering and tuning instead of the fretless from the ouble bass and in a way has nothing to do with a precision pickup and such.
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