#1
Just today I was jamming with my guitar teacher. He was playing a blues rhythm that was rather fast but I was stumped as to what ideas I should have used. In the key of A Minor Pentatonic, of course, but whenever I improvised over it it didn't seem to satisfy me. I was thinking something like SRV and his overall sound. Licks and all. Thanks.

Edit: How do you think I should improvise over it?
Gear:

Guitars:
Takamine Gs330S
Fender Standard Stratocaster
Ibanez RG3EXQM1
Epiphone SG G-310

Amps:
Crate Palomino V16

Pedals
Ibanez TS9DX
Line 6 Tonecore Uber Metal
Last edited by md41 at Jun 30, 2008,
#3
have you ever thought of adapting that story into a novel?
perhaps a feature length film starring russel crowe and jennifer love hewitt?
Quotes from other UGers in your signatures that talk about how good you are suck donkey schlong.
#4
What the f*ck?
You're acting as if this is the f*cking Pit. Christ. I'm just asking a question.
Gear:

Guitars:
Takamine Gs330S
Fender Standard Stratocaster
Ibanez RG3EXQM1
Epiphone SG G-310

Amps:
Crate Palomino V16

Pedals
Ibanez TS9DX
Line 6 Tonecore Uber Metal
#5
Learn how to play some of his songs and ninja some licks.
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#6
Time for a repost, me thinks. Read it, it's sort of relevant. Keep it in mind I wrote it for someone that plays alot of metal.
____________________
I think you should take it back a step. If I said you were playing major/minor scales (instead of pentatonics) would I be right? Well take a step back and start playing the simple pentatonic scales.

Once you've learnt a few shapes (2 or 3 is fine) of the pentatonic scale, you probably should try to focus on what you feel is the right next note and play REALLY slow. Try to listen to some of those slow expressive blues solo's to get what I mean. Whilst doing this, try to become proficient at moving around the fretboard and between shapes. Aim to be able to slide between 3 or 4 notes on the same string.
Copying a singers phrasing and rhthym is generally a good idea to when learning how to improvise. And I dont mean metal singers/screamers, who sing really fast. Copy something slow. This is how people started writing those slow blues solo's.


Doing this will get your phrasing (by copying those singers) and your technique (by moving between shapes) ready for doing some real solo's (as in, stuff that sounds good).


Than after you've got all that down and when you're good enough to say that you personally enjoy what you're playing (it took me a couple of years to enjoy my pentatonic wankery), you'll be ready to move on. Than study the major scale, the intervals behind it, the way these intervals create harmonic/melodic consonance and dissonance and watch melodic control by marty friedman. Pretty much look for and study as much theory as you can eat. And analyse solo's, ask yourself, why do they sound good?
At this stage you should start realising that the same note can sound better or worse over different chords and some notes sound better or worse when followed (or preceeded) by some notes. Exploiting this will enable you to control what you're solo's are going to feel like, instead of blindly looking for the right note.
#7
Bumped. There... added a question.
Gear:

Guitars:
Takamine Gs330S
Fender Standard Stratocaster
Ibanez RG3EXQM1
Epiphone SG G-310

Amps:
Crate Palomino V16

Pedals
Ibanez TS9DX
Line 6 Tonecore Uber Metal
#8
Quote by md41
Bumped. There... added a question.

Do not bump threads. Ever.

Anyway, follow elven and demon's advice, very good tips in those posts.
Quote by leafy
have you ever thought of adapting that story into a novel?
perhaps a feature length film starring russel crowe and jennifer love hewitt?

*reported*
#9
if you are having trouble with the speed of the progression, then one trick i've found that rally helps you hammer in the changes is simply playing straight arpeggios up and down over the the entire thing a few times, then play the arpeggios in a new position. and when practicing it by yourself and with your teacher, slow the tempo down and gradually increase it while doing this arpeggio exercise. Not only will this help you hear the changes and feel the entire thing, but it will greatly increase your fretboard knowledge.
and the pentatonics work wonderfully and dont sound unoriginal when phrased well
Quote by :-D
I go to college with mattrsg1; for what it's worth he is the best guitarist I have heard in person, and in particular stands out from others in my age group. You will not be disappointed, honestly.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AJpCZpysf94
#10
Quote by :-D
Do not bump threads. Ever.

Anyway, follow elven and demon's advice, very good tips in those posts.

*reported*

Ah, sorry. Just showing that I edited it.
Shouldn't have, my bad. I don't normally bump threads now. I mostly move on.
Gear:

Guitars:
Takamine Gs330S
Fender Standard Stratocaster
Ibanez RG3EXQM1
Epiphone SG G-310

Amps:
Crate Palomino V16

Pedals
Ibanez TS9DX
Line 6 Tonecore Uber Metal
#11
Quote by mattrsg1
if you are having trouble with the speed of the progression, then one trick i've found that rally helps you hammer in the changes is simply playing straight arpeggios up and down over the the entire thing a few times, then play the arpeggios in a new position. and when practicing it by yourself and with your teacher, slow the tempo down and gradually increase it while doing this arpeggio exercise. Not only will this help you hear the changes and feel the entire thing, but it will greatly increase your fretboard knowledge.
and the pentatonics work wonderfully and dont sound unoriginal when phrased well

Thanks much, really. I'll try it out
Gear:

Guitars:
Takamine Gs330S
Fender Standard Stratocaster
Ibanez RG3EXQM1
Epiphone SG G-310

Amps:
Crate Palomino V16

Pedals
Ibanez TS9DX
Line 6 Tonecore Uber Metal