#1
I'm really curious as to why and how Malmsteen's technique looks so effortless and minute in motion. There are many well-known technically advanced guitarists, but I've never really seen someone who has the overall fluidity (especially in the picking hand) as Yngwie. It's as if he hardly moves!

Thoughts? Comments?
#6
the scalloped fretboard assists him alot in his picking technique because it allows his left hand to move faster. With is left hand moving faster he just needs to swipe up and down with a turn of the wrist.
#7
Quote by Stratmaster458
the scalloped fretboard assists him alot in his picking technique because it allows his left hand to move faster. With is left hand moving faster he just needs to swipe up and down with a turn of the wrist.


That makes absolutely no sense whatsoever.

TS: It probably has an awful lot to do with obsessive practice regimes to the point of dropping out of school early.
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#8
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
That makes absolutely no sense whatsoever.

TS: It probably has an awful lot to do with obsessive practice regimes to the point of dropping out of school early.


actually it makes quite a bit of sense, if you've ever played on a scalloped fretboard you'd understand. you could literally play without a pick and sound the notes you wanted to sound. i've played a couple guitars that were scalloped and it made it SOOOO much easier to play its crazy. don't get me wrong, i'm sure he has a healthy practice regimen, but it requires very little pressure to play on the scalloped out guitars which is why it looks like he's playing effortlessly, it's because he is.
#9
Also, keep in mind that there's a huge aspect of practice that guitarists often overlook: economy of motion. If you want to play effortlessly, you're going to have to work at consciously examining how much effort you're expending and then adjust your motions so that you're keeping yourself as loose and relaxed as possible. Economy of motion and reduction in tension will go hand in hand, and really require targeted practice; a lot of guitarists don't do this, but it's something I'm sure Yngwie has looked at consistently as he practices.
#10
Quote by Sound Mind
he has practiced a lot maybe?


Quote by marshmellow666
it's called practice with no sleep for years and no life


Quote by MetalIsBrootalz
that's Malsteen for ya


Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
It probably has an awful lot to do with obsessive practice regimes to the point of dropping out of school early.


I understand he must have practiced a ton, but I don't doubt that there are other guitarists who have practice just as much as him. So I don't see the validity in the logic there.

Quote by z4twenny
actually it makes quite a bit of sense, if you've ever played on a scalloped fretboard you'd understand. you could literally play without a pick and sound the notes you wanted to sound. i've played a couple guitars that were scalloped and it made it SOOOO much easier to play its crazy. don't get me wrong, i'm sure he has a healthy practice regimen, but it requires very little pressure to play on the scalloped out guitars which is why it looks like he's playing effortlessly, it's because he is.


I've never played a scalloped fretboard. I'm not gonna go out and go buy a guitar with a scalloped board now JUST because Yngwie plays with one, but I'd be interested to at least give it a try.

Quote by :-D
Also, keep in mind that there's a huge aspect of practice that guitarists often overlook: economy of motion. If you want to play effortlessly, you're going to have to work at consciously examining how much effort you're expending and then adjust your motions so that you're keeping yourself as loose and relaxed as possible. Economy of motion and reduction in tension will go hand in hand, and really require targeted practice; a lot of guitarists don't do this, but it's something I'm sure Yngwie has looked at consistently as he practices.


That's a valid point. I've never really consciously looked into that heh.
Last edited by fixationdarknes at Jun 30, 2008,
#12
Quote by :-D
And my post wasn't quoted....


Lol you posted within the window of time that I had already hit "reply" so I originally missed out on that but as you can see I've already edited it in so don't cry dry your eye
#13
Quote by fixationdarknes
Lol you posted within the window of time that I had already hit "reply" so I originally missed out on that but as you can see I've already edited it in so don't cry dry your eye

Okay, back to normal now.

It helps a lot to look into that; I noticed earlier this year that when I did chromatic exercises or legato licks, my index finger and pinky had a tendency to leapfrog off the neck before coming down again. I actually took my right hand and kept it on top of my left so the fingers couldn't move that far and repeated patterns over and over until my fingers naturally stayed closer to the neck. My legato technique specifically has improved tenfold since I did that; as strange as it seemed, I figured it could only help me.
#14
Quote by :-D
Okay, back to normal now.

It helps a lot to look into that; I noticed earlier this year that when I did chromatic exercises or legato licks, my index finger and pinky had a tendency to leapfrog off the neck before coming down again. I actually took my right hand and kept it on top of my left so the fingers couldn't move that far and repeated patterns over and over until my fingers naturally stayed closer to the neck. My legato technique specifically has improved tenfold since I did that; as strange as it seemed, I figured it could only help me.


Haha wow that's an interesting method of practicing. That's one of the problems I have. My fingers, specifically my pinky, always flies way farther than necessary off the fretboard. I might give your little method a try haha, but other than that I imagine it simply takes hours of nitty-gritty slow-as-hell practice. I guess I've been too impatient to do that lol.
#15
Quote by fixationdarknes
Haha wow that's an interesting method of practicing. That's one of the problems I have. My fingers, specifically my pinky, always flies way farther than necessary off the fretboard. I might give your little method a try haha, but other than that I imagine it simply takes hours of nitty-gritty slow-as-hell practice. I guess I've been too impatient to do that lol.

Yeah, the "hold-fingers-down" practice was hell but it really paid off. I'd say it's definitely worth a shot, and see if you can find other ways to work on economy of motion.
#17
Quote by fixationdarknes
I'll let you know if I stumble across Yngwie's dark and secret book of fluid guitar-playing

Good luck finding that, I think it's located near Fall Out Boy's testicles. They say no one even knows the location.
#18
Quote by :-D
Good luck finding that, I think it's located near Fall Out Boy's testicles. They say no one even knows the location.


That's cause they don't exist.
#19
Quote by z4twenny
actually it makes quite a bit of sense, if you've ever played on a scalloped fretboard you'd understand. you could literally play without a pick and sound the notes you wanted to sound. i've played a couple guitars that were scalloped and it made it SOOOO much easier to play its crazy. don't get me wrong, i'm sure he has a healthy practice regimen, but it requires very little pressure to play on the scalloped out guitars which is why it looks like he's playing effortlessly, it's because he is.

Allan Holdsworth can play inhumanly fast and smooth legato with an normal fretboard. Hendrix tore it up on the fretboard with his left hand held high. They aren't the only ones; lots of guitarists employ "ghost hammer-ons" and similar techniques that sound previously silent strings without involving the picking hand. You don't need scalloped frets for great legato technique. Besides, unless you have a really light touch you'll always play sharp because you'll press too hard on the strings and bend them, especially on chords.
Insane discipline and a grueling practise schedule, combined with years of experience, are what give Yngwie his amazing technique.
EDIT: lmao at 3rd eye
Last edited by Nightfyre at Jun 30, 2008,
#20
Another example of great picking technique:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n2dJyOdZ2X0&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_wBmIp1-CVY&feature=related

BTW, he doesn't play on a scalloped fretboard.
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#21
Quote by fixationdarknes
That's a valid point. I've never really consciously looked into that heh.


I'm shocked, honestly. Economy of motion is all important. It's something that should always be right to the forefront of any practice when you want to get faster. If that's not clear in of my lessons i better add that in when it comes to the sticky time...
#22
Quote by Freepower
I'm shocked, honestly. Economy of motion is all important. It's something that should always be right to the forefront of any practice when you want to get faster. If that's not clear in of my lessons i better add that in when it comes to the sticky time...


Well, I don't think it's the fault of your lessons. I mean does economy of motion itself branch into further topics of SPECIFIC things you can do to minimize motion? It seems more like something that should just be implemented into one's overall logical approach at playing guitar, so it seems there's not much you can really say about it.

So there's Yngwie Malmsteen. Another one I can think of off the top of my head of Michael Romeo. Both of these guys seem to have SUCH TINY movements of motion in their overall playing. I'm not saying there aren't others with very great economy of motion, but these are the ones that I can think of right now. Have they both seriously practiced at specifically improving their economy of motion for THAT much longer than say someone like Vai or Govan? <-- Don't get me wrong, both phenomenal players, but IMO the former two have a noticeably greater overall economy of motion.
Last edited by fixationdarknes at Jul 1, 2008,
#23
Quote by fixationdarknes
So there's Yngwie Malmsteen. Another one I can think of off the top of my head of Michael Romeo. Both of these guys seem to have SUCH TINY movements of motion in their overall playing. I'm not saying there aren't others with very great economy of motion, but these are the ones that I can think of right now. Have they both seriously practiced at specifically improving their economy of motion for THAT much longer than say someone like Vai or Govan? <-- Don't get me wrong, both phenomenal players, but IMO the former two have a noticeably greater overall economy of motion.


Well, off the top of my head, Vai has practiced significantly less than Yngwie on pure technique (say, 1 hour in every 10 for his everyday routine, the rest being sight reading, improv, phrasing, etc...) and Romeo has practiced in a much more "correct" manner than Govan, who has been playing for ages. Course, you'll find that some players are deceptively economical - look at a Guthrie or Vai transcription and you'll find much more finger rolling and awkward skips than a typical malmsteen or romeo solo.

In short -


Have they both seriously practiced at specifically improving their economy of motion for THAT much longer than say someone like Vai or Govan?


Yes, as far as i know.