#1
How do I play a song in lets say the key of A (minor pentatonic) and change it? What key do I change it to? Would I change it to the key of D(the third)? I have been trying to figure this out, but I can't get it to sound well.
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#2
The best key changes are to and from keys with the smallest amount of difference (study the circle of fifths), relative minor/major and non relative minor/major (C minor to C major).
#3
Quote by RockGuitar92
How do I play a song in lets say the key of A (minor pentatonic) and change it?
There are heaps of ways to change keys. The simplest way is to just change key (no thought whatsoever, just start playing in a new key).
What key do I change it to?
Whatever you choose, different keys will have different effects.
Would I change it to the key of D(the third)?
D is actually the fourth of A. D would be a good choice because it is closely related to A (only one note is different).

Sorry I can't be more help

Quote by demon
non relative minor/major (C minor to C major).
By 'non-relative' you mean 'parallel'.
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#4
are you just talking about taking a song already written and transposing it to a different key, or having a key change in a song you're writing?
#5
Song I am writing but mainly I wanna know so I got put it in my guitar theory and reference book even though thats kinda corny.
Quote by Tyler Durden
It's only after we've lost everything that we're free to do anything.

Erowid
#6
You have to remember that theory isn't rules. It's a way of describing music, so you can communicate with other musicians.

So basically you can just switch, out of the blue. However that doesn't always sound good, so try to lead into it. Find a chord that shares notes in common with both keys, and kind of use it as a bridge.

Do a bit of reading on key modulation.
#7
Quote by demonofthenight
The best key changes are to and from keys with the smallest amount of difference (study the circle of fifths), relative minor/major and non relative minor/major (C minor to C major).


trust me on this, and try changing to the flat 5th.

theoretically, it should sound horrible, but if done properly and fluently, it sounds ****ing epic.
#8
Quote by NakedInTheRain
trust me on this, and try changing to the flat 5th.

theoretically, it should sound horrible, but if done properly and fluently, it sounds ****ing epic.
Like by using a tritone substitution? Yeah, sounds awesome to me. Very jazzy.

You can pretty much do any sort of change AND make it sound good (as in acceptable to most ears) if you use the right chords.
#9
^Perfect intervals are diminished, not flattened. Just pointin it out. The first post basically explains everything.
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#10
The most common and simple modulation is from Tonic to Dominant.

So if you are playing in C major, the modulation will be to G major.
#11
There's actually a fairly methodical way of determining "closely related keys".

The most closely related are the 2 nearest neighbors on the circle of 5ths.
For the key of C that would be F and G. Note that F and G are the IV and V in C.
Then you can take all the relative minors. So the closest related keys to C are

F and G Major
D, E and A Minor

The next relationship is the parallel minor. So C Minor for C Major.

Then you can use C minor's harmonization to get more keys:

C Minor
Eb Major
F Minor
G Minor
Ab Major
Bb Major

Finally, you can take the parallel minors, of the above major's:

Eb Minor
Ab Minor
Bb Minor

So, that would be a list of related keys that potentially have some interesting
modulations from the key of C.