#1
I need a book that cover whats beyond major scale harmony, chord construction and progressions (the basics you can find on the internet)

not guitar theory books where they show you a bunch of scale shapes and chords voicings

any suggestion is appreciated.
#2
London College Of Music Exams - Popular Music Theory, available Grade 1 - 8.
This is the series I use at college, and you use this board to do theory exams. Worth checking out, see if it's what you want.
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#3
at this point you are going to be looking for books on specific topics within music theory most likely, what exactly do you want to learn about, and yes also college level music textbooks, but those can get really really expensive.
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#4
Mark levine writes a good theory book. It might be a bit complex for beginners though.

Alot of guys suggest music theory for dummies and the complete idiots guide to music theory. Both very highly suggested here on the forums.

Personally I like Jody Fishers books. Really simple, really good explainations. But theres alot of scale shapes and chord voicings.
#5
Im not sure what subjects i want to learn about

i googled all the suggestions and mark levine's jazz theory book seem to get the highest ratings so i think im gonna go with that for now.
#6
Quote by @!@
Im not sure what subjects i want to learn about

i googled all the suggestions and mark levine's jazz theory book seem to get the highest ratings so i think im gonna go with that for now.
It's expensive and hard to find (just like all music theory books). But I'm sure you could find something if you google "mark-levine jazz theory book rapidshare" without the quotes and clicked on the first link
#7
Quote by demonofthenight
It's expensive and hard to find (just like all music theory books). But I'm sure you could find something if you google "mark-levine jazz theory book rapidshare" without the quotes and clicked on the first link


huh? it's $30 on amazon, not really expensive or hard to find.
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#8
The Practice of Harmony by Peter Spencer. It's a bit expensive but it's well worth it.
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#9
Quote by Kid_Thorazine
huh? it's $30 on amazon, not really expensive or hard to find.


Really cheap and it's huge. Fantastic value. And btw, threadstarter, I doubt you need to cover anything "more than" "major scale harmony, chord construction and progressions". I mean, if you were sorted for that you could be writing Mark Levine's book, let alone reading it.

Just pointing that out.
#10
Quote by demonofthenight
It's expensive and hard to find (just like all music theory books). But I'm sure you could find something if you google "mark-levine jazz theory book rapidshare" without the quotes and clicked on the first link


already found it

freepower, i only meant that i understand the very basics and would like to go deeper into theory.

EDIT: link deleted
Last edited by @!@ at Jul 1, 2008,
#11
^please delete that link from the forums. if I have to do it, it will be accompanied by a warning.

edit: thank you buddy.
#12
For improvisational theory the best material is generally in Jazz.

I have:

Jazz Theory Resources (Bert Ligon)
Jazzology
Jazz Theory (Mark Levine)

That's pretty much the order I like them in. Ligon's book focuses mainly on
Major/Minor harmony in the entire first volume. It barely mentions modes until
Vol II. Very good stuff. Jazzology has lots of nice examples.

They all cover the same stuff in different ways. All standard notation and they all
assume a basic theory understanding.
#13
I recommend all the jazz books mentioned thus far, as well as David Baker's Jazz Improvization.

Outside of the jazz realm, Harmony and Theory is a fantastic textbook, as well as Gradus Ad Parnassum for study in counterpoint and The Fundamentals of Musical Composition by Arnold Schoenberg.
#14
as funny as it sounds, i recommend "Music Theory for Dummies" i bought it my sophomore year of highschool and it really turned me onto loving music theory as opposed to like 90% of every other musician, lol. so it MUST be good
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#15
Quote by Wolfbite718
as funny as it sounds, i recommend "Music Theory for Dummies" i bought it my sophomore year of highschool and it really turned me onto loving music theory as opposed to like 90% of every other musician, lol. so it MUST be good


That's a good book, but I think the TS wants something more advanced.
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