#2
a series of chords, changing from one chord to another?, learn a piece with more than uno chord and practice moving fingers from chord A to chord B
Quote by Mathamology
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#3
My first chord progression was;

G-D-Am-G-D-C-G-D-C.....repeating. It's easy and it sounds cool. I still warm up with that one.

If you were asking for the definition of a chord progression Mark hit the nail on the head.
#4
Quote by markazord
a series of chords, changing from one chord to another?, learn a piece with more than uno chord and practice moving fingers from chord A to chord B


+1

If you want a fun simple chord progression, you can play Brown Eyed Girl by Van Morrison. It's G, C, G, D. For the most part anyway. There is Em and D7 in it also, but you can just start with the first part.
#5
a basic chord progression usually consists of a third, a fifth and a seventh chord in whichever key you are playing in. err.... I think , if all my music theory is up to par.


Say you are in the Key of C which has no sharps or flats...

so a viable progression could be E- G- A

technically you could play these in any order( I think)


anyways, I'm pretty sure thats a basic explanation of a chord progression. Don't hold me to that though... I'm still learning my theory.
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#6
Quote by damole
what are chord progressions and how do u do it?
The easiest way is to take a Major chord and harmonize it. Meaning get the chords out of it.
Heres a good link to learn how to do that

After that, all you have to do is find the chords which sound good together. Personally, I believe the chords move best upwards 7 or 5 semitones or downwards 5 or 7 semitones.

Theres other ways of constructing chord progressions, like by using modes or minor scales. But thats alot harder.